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Ethelbert Dudley Warfield
Ethelbert Dudley Warfield, D.D., LL.D. (March 16, 1861 – July 6, 1936) was an American professor of history and college president who served as president of Miami University, Lafayette College
Lafayette College
and Wilson College. As Miami University's youngest president, he was noted for bringing football to Miami where its first intercollegiate game was played against the University of Cincinnati
University of Cincinnati
in 1888.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life3.1 Honorary degrees4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] He was born in Lexington, Kentucky
Lexington, Kentucky
to William Warfield and Mary Cabell Warfield (née Breckinridge). He was the brother of Princeton theologian Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield
Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield
(1851–1921)
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The Reverend
The Reverend
The Reverend
is an honorific style[1] most often placed before the names of Christian clergy and ministers. There are sometimes differences in the way the style is used in different countries and church traditions. The Reverend
The Reverend
is correctly called a style but is often and in some dictionaries called a title, form of address or title of respect.[2] The style is also sometimes used by leaders in non-Christian religions such as Judaism
Judaism
and Buddhism. The term is an anglicisation of the Latin reverendus, the style originally used in Latin documents in medieval Europe. It is the gerundive or future passive participle of the verb revereri ("to respect; to revere"), meaning "[one who is] to be revered/must be respected". The Reverend
The Reverend
is therefore equivalent to The Honourable or The Venerable
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Chambersburg, Pennsylvania
Chambersburg is a borough in and the county seat of Franklin County, in the South Central region of Pennsylvania, United States. It is in the Cumberland Valley, which is part of the Great Appalachian Valley, and 13 miles (21 km) north of Maryland
Maryland
and the Mason-Dixon line and 52 miles (84 km) southwest of Harrisburg, the state capital. According to the United States Census Bureau, Chambersburg's 2010 population was 20,268.[5] When combined with the surrounding Greene, Hamilton, and Guilford Townships, the population of Greater Chambersburg is 52,273 people. The Chambersburg, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area includes surrounding Franklin County, and in 2010 included 149,618 people.[6] Chambersburg's settlement began in 1730 when water mills were built at the confluence of Conococheague Creek
Conococheague Creek
and Falling Spring Creek that now run through the center of the town
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Confederate States Of America
The Confederate States of America
Confederate States of America
(CSA or C.S.), commonly referred to as the Confederacy, was an unrecognized country in North America that existed from 1861 to 1865. The Confederacy was originally formed by seven secessionist slave-holding states – South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas
Texas
– in the Lower South
Lower South
region of the United States, whose regional economy was heavily dependent upon agriculture, particularly cotton, and a plantation system that relied upon the labor of African-American slaves.[2] Each state declared its secession from the United States
United States
following the November 1860 election of Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
to the U.S. presidency on a platform which opposed the expansion of slavery into the western territories
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General
A general officer is an officer of high rank in the army, and in some nations' air forces or marines.[1] The term "general" is used in two ways: as the generic title for all grades of general officer and as a specific rank. It originates in the 16th century, as a shortening of captain general, which rank was taken from Middle French capitaine général. The adjective general had been affixed to officer designations since the late medieval period to indicate relative superiority or an extended jurisdiction. Today, the title of "General" is known in some countries as a four-star rank. However different countries use different systems of stars for senior ranks
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American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
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Wallis Warfield Simpson, Duchess Of Windsor
Wallis Simpson (born Bessie Wallis Warfield; 19 June 1896[1] – 24 April 1986), later known as the Duchess of Windsor, was an American socialite whose intended marriage to the British king Edward VIII caused a constitutional crisis that led to Edward's abdication. Wallis grew up in Baltimore. Her father died shortly after her birth and she and her widowed mother were partly supported by their wealthier relatives. Her first marriage, to U.S. naval officer Win Spencer, was punctuated by periods of separation and eventually ended in divorce. In 1931, during her second marriage, to Ernest Simpson, she met Edward, then Prince of Wales
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Edward VIII
Edward VIII
Edward VIII
(Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of the United Kingdom
King of the United Kingdom
and the Dominions of the British Empire, and Emperor of India, from 20 January 1936 until his abdication on 11 December the same year. Edward was the eldest son of King George V
George V
and Queen Mary. He was named Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
on his sixteenth birthday, nine weeks after his father succeeded as king. As a young man, he served in the British Army during the First World War
First World War
and undertook several overseas tours on behalf of his father. Edward became king on his father's death in early 1936. However, he showed impatience with court protocol, and caused concern among politicians by his apparent disregard for established constitutional conventions
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Wadham College
Wadham College /ˈwɒdəm/ is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
in the United Kingdom. It is located in the centre of Oxford, at the intersection of Broad Street and Parks Road. Wadham College was founded in 1610 by Dorothy Wadham, according to the will of her late husband Nicholas Wadham, a member of an ancient Devon and Somerset
Somerset
family. The central buildings, a notable example of Jacobean architecture, were designed by the architect William Arnold and erected between 1610 and 1613. They include a large and ornate Hall. Adjacent to the central buildings are the Wadham Gardens, notable for their collection of trees and one of the largest gardens amongst Oxford colleges.[citation needed] Amongst Wadham's most famous alumni is Sir Christopher Wren
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Presbyterian Church USA
The Presbyterian
Presbyterian
Church (USA), or PC(USA), is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination
Christian denomination
in the United States. A part of the Reformed tradition, it is the largest Presbyterian
Presbyterian
denomination in the U.S., and known for its relatively progressive stance on doctrine
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Los Angeles, California
Los AngelesCSA Los Angeles-Long BeachMSA Los Angeles-Long Beach-AnaheimPueblo September 4, 1781[3]City status May 23, 1835[4]Incorporated April 4, 1850[5]Named for Our Lady, Queen of the AngelsGovernment • Type Mayor-Council-Commission[6] • Body Los Angeles
Los Angeles
City Council • Mayor Eric Garcetti[7] • City Attorney Mike Feuer[7] • City Controller Ron Galperin[7]Area[8] • City in California 502.76 sq m
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Natick, Massachusetts
Natick /ˈneɪtɪk/ is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. Natick is located near the center of the MetroWest region of Massachusetts, with a population of 32,786 at the 2010 census. Only 10 miles (16 km) west from Boston, Natick is considered part of the Greater Boston
Boston
area. The center of population of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
in 2000 was located in Natick.[2] A 2014 census shows Natick's population was 34,230
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John C. Breckinridge
Mexican-American War
Mexican-American War
American Civil WarBattle of Shiloh Battle of Baton Rouge Battle of Stones River Battle of Jackson Battle of Chickamauga Chattanooga Campaign Battle of New Market Battle of Piedmont Battle of Lynchburg Battle of Monocacy Battle of Bull's Gap Battle of MarionJohn Cabell Breckinridge
Cabell Breckinridge
(January 16, 1821 – May 17, 1875) was an American lawyer, politician, and soldier. He represented Kentucky
Kentucky
in both houses of Congress and became the 14th and youngest-ever Vice President of the United States, serving from 1857 to 1861. He served in the U.S. Senate during the outbreak of the American Civil War, but was expelled after joining the Confederate Army. He was appointed Confederate Secretary of War in 1865. Breckinridge was born near Lexington, Kentucky
Kentucky
to a prominent local family
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Princeton Theological Seminary
Princeton Theological Seminary (PTS) is a private, nonprofit, and independent graduate school of theology in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1812 under the auspices of Archibald Alexander, the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, and the College
College
of New Jersey (now Princeton University), it is the second-oldest seminary in the United States.[1][2] It is also the largest of ten seminaries associated with the Presbyterian Church (USA). Princeton Seminary has long been influential in theological studies, with many leading biblical scholars, theologians, and clergy among its faculty and alumni. In addition, it operates one of the largest theological libraries in the world and maintains a number of special collections, including the Karl Barth
Karl Barth
Research Collection in the Center for Barth Studies
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Sons Of The American Revolution
The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution
American Revolution
(SAR or NSSAR) is an American congressionally chartered organization, founded in 1889, and headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky. A non-profit corporation, it has described its purpose as maintaining and extending "the institutions of American freedom, an appreciation for true patriotism, a respect for our national symbols, the value of American citizenship, [and] the unifying force of 'e pluribus unum' that has created, from the people of many nations, one nation and one people."[5] The members of the society are male descendants of people who served in the American Revolutionary War
American Revolutionary War
or who contributed to establishing the independence of the United States
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John Breckinridge (U.S. Attorney General)
John Breckinridge (December 2, 1760 – December 14, 1806) was a lawyer and politician from the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Virginia. He served in the state legislatures of Virginia
Virginia
and Kentucky
Kentucky
before being elected to the U.S. Senate and appointed United States Attorney General
United States Attorney General
during the second term of President Thomas Jefferson. He is the progenitor of Kentucky's Breckinridge political family and the namesake of Breckinridge County, Kentucky. Breckinridge's father was a local politician, and his mother was a member of the Preston political family. Breckinridge attended the William and Mary College intermittently between 1780 and 1784; his attendance was interrupted by the Revolutionary War and his election to the Virginia
Virginia
House of Delegates
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