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Etesian
The etesians (/ɪˈtiːʒənz/ or /ɪˈtiːziənz/; Ancient Greek: ἐτησίαι, translit. etēsiai, lit. 'periodic winds';[1] sometimes found in the Latin form etesiae), meltemia (Greek: μελτέμια; pl. of μελτέμι meltemi), or meltem (Turkish) are the strong, dry north winds of the Aegean Sea, which blow from about mid-May to mid-September. The Etesian
Etesian
winds are a dominant weather influence in the Aegean Basin. They are at their strongest in the afternoon and often die down at night, but sometimes meltemi winds last for days without a break. Similar winds blow in the Adriatic
Adriatic
and Ionian regions. Meltemi winds are dangerous to sailors because they come up in clear weather without warning and can blow at 7–8 Beaufort.[2] Some yachts and most inter-island ferries cannot sail under such conditions
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Ancient Greek Language
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Henry Liddell
Henry George Liddell (/ˈlɪdəl/;[1] 6 February 1811 – 18 January 1898) was dean (1855–91) of Christ Church, Oxford, Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University (1870–74), headmaster (1846–55) of Westminster School[2] (where a house is now named after him), author of A History of Rome (1855), and co-author (with Robert Scott) of the monumental work A Greek–English Lexicon,[3] known as "Liddell and Scott", which is still widely used by students of Greek. Lewis Carroll wrote Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
for Henry Liddell's daughter Alice.Contents1 Biography 2 Anecdotes 3 Parents and grandparents 4 Marriage and children 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit]Caricature of Rev. Henry Liddell
Henry Liddell
by 'Ape' from Vanity Fair (1875)Liddell received his education at Charterhouse and Christ Church, Oxford
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Khamaseen
Khamsīn , chamsin or hamsin (Arabic: خمسين‎ khamsīn, "fifty"), more commonly known in Egypt
Egypt
as khamaseen (Egyptian Arabic: خماسين‎ khamasīn, IPA: [xæmæˈsiːn]), is a dry, hot, sandy local wind, blowing from the south, in North Africa
North Africa
and the Arabian Peninsula. Similar winds in the area are sirocco and simoom. From the Arabic
Arabic
word for "fifty", throughout the Levant, these dry, sand-filled windstorms often blow sporadically over a fifty-day period in spring, hence the name. When the storm passes over an area, lasting for several hours, it carries great quantities of sand and dust from the deserts, with a speed up to 140 kilometers per hour, and the humidity in that area drops below 5%. Even in winter, the temperatures rise above 45°C due to the storm
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Sirocco
Sirocco, scirocco, /sɪˈrɒkoʊ/, jugo or, rarely, siroc (Catalan: Xaloc, Greek: Σορόκος, Spanish: Siroco, Occitan: Siròc, Eisseròc, Croatian: Jugo, literally southerly , Libyan Arabic: Ghibli, Egypt: khamsin, Tunisia: ch'hilli) is a Mediterranean
Mediterranean
wind that comes from the Sahara
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Encyclopædia Britannica
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
( Latin
Latin
for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia. It is written by about 100 full-time editors and more than 4,000 contributors, who have included 110 Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
winners and five American presidents. The 2010 version of the 15th edition, which spans 32 volumes[1] and 32,640 pages, was the last printed edition; digital content and distribution has continued since then. The Britannica is the oldest English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia still in production. It was first published between 1768 and 1771 in the Scottish capital of Edinburgh, as three volumes
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Nominative Case
The nominative case (abbreviated NOM), subjective case, straight case or upright case is one of the grammatical cases of a noun or other part of speech, which generally marks the subject of a verb or the predicate noun or predicate adjective, as opposed to its object or other verb arguments
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Grammatical Gender
In linguistics, grammatical gender is a specific form of noun class system in which the division of noun classes forms an agreement system with another aspect of the language, such as adjectives, articles, pronouns, or verbs. This system is used in approximately one quarter of the world's languages. In these languages, most or all nouns inherently carry one value of the grammatical category called gender;[2] the values present in a given language (of which there are usually two or three) are called the genders of that language. According to one definition: "Genders are classes of nouns reflected in the behaviour of associated words."[3][4][5] Common gender divisions include masculine and feminine; masculine, feminine and neuter; or animate and inanimate
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Genitive Case
In grammar, genitive (abbreviated gen;[1] also called the second case) is the grammatical case that marks a noun as modifying another noun. It often marks a noun as being the possessor of another noun.[2] However, it can also indicate various relationships other than possession: certain verbs may take arguments in the genitive case, and it may have adverbial uses (see Adverbial genitive). Placing the modifying noun in the genitive case is one way to indicate that two nouns are related in a genitive construction. Modern English typically does not morphologically mark nouns for a genitive case in order to indicate a genitive construction; instead, it uses either the 's clitic or a preposition (usually of). However, the personal pronouns do have distinct possessive forms. There are various other ways to indicate a genitive construction, as well
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Cf.
The abbreviation cf. (short for the Latin: confer/conferatur, both meaning "compare")[1] is used in writing to refer the reader to other material to make a comparison with the topic being discussed. It is used to form a contrast, for example: "Abbott (2010) found supportive results in her memory experiment, unlike those of previous work (cf. Zeller & Williams, 2007)."[2] It is recommended that "cf." be used only to suggest a comparison, and the word "see" be used to point to a source of information.[3][4]Contents1 Biological use 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBiological use[edit] In biological naming conventions, cf. is commonly placed between the genus name and the species name to describe a specimen that is difficult to identify because of practical difficulties, such as the specimen being poorly preserved. For example, " Barbus
Barbus
cf
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Robert Scott (philologist)
Robert Scott (26 January 1811 – 2 December 1887) was a British academic philologist and Church of England
Church of England
priest. Scott was ordained in 1835 and held the college living of Duloe, Cornwall, from 1845 to 1850. He was a prebendary of Exeter Cathedral from 1845 to 1866 and rector of South Luffenham, Rutland, from 1850 to 1854 when he was elected Master of Balliol College, Oxford. He served as Dean Ireland's Professor of the Exegesis of Holy Scripture
Dean Ireland's Professor of the Exegesis of Holy Scripture
at Oxford from 1861 to 1870 and as the Dean of Rochester
Dean of Rochester
from 1870 until his death in 1887. Scott is best known as the co-editor (with his colleague Henry Liddell) of A Greek-English Lexicon, the standard dictionary of the classical Greek language
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Philip II Of Macedon
Philip II of Macedon[2] (Greek: Φίλιππος Β΄ ὁ Μακεδών, Phílippos II ho Makedṓn; 382–336 BC) was the king (basileus) of the Ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon
Macedon
from 359 BC until his assassination in 336 BC. He was a member of the Argead dynasty of Macedonian kings, the third son of King Amyntas III of Macedon, and father of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
and Philip III. The rise of Macedon
Macedon
during the reign of Philip II was achieved in part by his reformation of the Ancient Macedonian army, establishing the Macedonian phalanx
Macedonian phalanx
that proved critical in securing victories on the battlefield
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A Greek–English Lexicon
A Greek–English Lexicon, often referred to as Liddell & Scott (/ˈlɪdəl/),[1] Liddell–Scott–Jones, or LSJ, is a standard lexicographical work of the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
language.Contents1 Liddell and Scott's lexicon 2 Condensed editions 3 The Supplement 4 Electronic editions 5 Translations 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLiddell and Scott's lexicon[edit] The lexicon was begun in the nineteenth century and is now in its ninth (revised) edition
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Perseus Project
The Perseus Project (version 4 also known as "Perseus Hopper")[1] is a digital library project of Tufts University, which is located in Medford and Somerville, near Boston, in the U.S. state of Massachusetts. The project assembles digital collections of humanities resources. It is hosted by the department of Classics. The project is mirrored by the Max Planck Society
Max Planck Society
in Berlin, Germany,[2] as well as by the University of Chicago.[3]Contents1 History 2 Text format 3 Copyright status 4 See also 5 References 6 Literature 7 External linksHistory[edit] The project was founded in 1987 to collect and present materials for the study of ancient Greece. It has published two CD-ROMs and established the Perseus Digital Library on the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
in 1995. The project has expanded its original scope; current collections cover Greco-Roman classics and the English Renaissance
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Robert S. P. Beekes
Robert Stephen Paul Beekes (Dutch: [ˈbeːkəs]; 2 September 1937 – 21 September 2017)[1] was Emeritus Professor of Comparative Indo-European Linguistics at Leiden University
Leiden University
and the author of many monographs on the Proto-Indo-European language.Contents1 Scholarly work 2 Publications (selection)2.1 Monographs 2.2 Edited volumes 2.3 Articles3 ReferencesScholarly work[edit] One of his most well-known books is Comparative Indo-European Linguistics: An Introduction, a standard handbook on Proto-Indo-European that treats the area of linguistic reconstruction thoroughly but also features cultural reconstruction and comparative linguistic methods in general. Beekes was also a co-author, with L. Bouke van der Meer, of De Etrusken spreken (1991)
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S.v.
This page lists English translations of notable Latin
Latin
phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. Some of the phrases are themselves translations of Greek phrases, as Greek rhetoric and literature reached its peak centuries before the rise of ancient Rome.This list covers the letter S. See List of Latin
Latin
phrases for the main list.List of Latin
Latin
phrasesA B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z fullReferencesS[edit]Latin Translation Notessaltus in demonstrando leap in explaining a leap in logic, by which a necessary part of an equation is omitted.salus in arduis a stronghold (or refuge) in difficulties a Roman Silver Age maxim. Also the school motto of Wellingborough School.salus populi suprema lex esto the welfare of the people is to be the highest law From Cicero's De Legibus, book III, part III, sub. VIII
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