HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ernest Poole
Ernest Cook Poole (January 23, 1880 – January 10, 1950) was an American journalist, novelist, and playwright
[...More...]

"Ernest Poole" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chicago
Chicago
Chicago
(/ʃɪˈkɑːɡoʊ, -ˈkɔː-/ ( listen)), officially the City
City
of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States. With over 2.7 million residents, it is also the most populous city in both the state of Illinois
Illinois
and the Midwestern United States. It is the county seat of Cook County
[...More...]

"Chicago" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

McClure's
McClure's
McClure's
or McClure's
McClure's
Magazine (1893–1929) was an American illustrated monthly periodical popular at the turn of the 20th century.[1] The magazine is credited with having started the tradition of muckraking journalism (investigative, watchdog, or reform journalism), and helped direct the moral compass of the day.[2] [3]Contents1 History 2 Staff2.1 Major writers 2.2 Contributors3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Founded by S. S. McClure
S. S. McClure
(1857–1949) and John Sanborn Phillips (1861–1949),[4] who had been classmates at Knox College, in June 1893,[5] the magazine featured both political and literary content, publishing serialized novels-in-progress, a chapter at a time. In this way, McClure's
McClure's
published such writers as Willa Cather, Arthur Conan Doyle, Herminie T
[...More...]

"McClure's" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Princeton Triangle Club
The Princeton Triangle Club
Princeton Triangle Club
is a theater troupe at Princeton University. Founded in 1891, it is the oldest touring collegiate musical-comedy troupe in the United States, and the only co-ed collegiate troupe that takes an original student-written musical on a national tour every year.[1] The club is known for its tradition of featuring an all-male kickline in drag. The troupe presents several shows throughout the year. In September at the end of the University's Freshman Week it presents a revue of popular material from previous years. In autumn it puts on an original student-written musical comedy in McCarter Theatre, then takes this show on tour over the Winter holiday season. In spring it puts on another original show in a smaller venue. During reunions after the end of the spring semester, it relaunches the previous autumn's show at McCarter. Among the club's notable alumni are F
[...More...]

"Princeton Triangle Club" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Muckraker
The term muckraker was used in the Progressive Era
Progressive Era
to characterize reform-minded American journalists who attacked established institutions and leaders as corrupt. They typically had large audiences in some popular magazines. In the US, the modern term is investigative journalism — it has different and more pejorative connotations in British English — and investigative journalists in the US today are often informally called 'muckrakers'. The muckrakers played a highly visible role during the Progressive Era period, 1890s–1920s.[1] Muckraking magazines—notably McClure's
McClure's
of the publisher S. S
[...More...]

"Muckraker" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

How The Other Half Lives
How the Other Half Lives: Studies among the Tenements of New York (1890) is an early publication of photojournalism by Jacob Riis, documenting squalid living conditions in New York City
New York City
slums in the 1880s. It served as a basis for future "muckraking" journalism by exposing the slums to New York City’s upper and middle classes. This work inspired many reforms of working-class housing, both immediately after publication as well as making a lasting impact in today's society.Contents1 Background1.1 19th century, New York City 1.2 Tenements2 Jacob Riis 3 Summary 4 Critical reception4.1 After publication 4.2 Lasting impact5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksBackground[edit] 19th century, New York City[edit] In the 1880s many people in upper- and middle-class society were unaware of the dangerous conditions in the slums among poor immigrants
[...More...]

"How The Other Half Lives" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jacob Riis
Jacob August Riis (May 3, 1849 – May 26, 1914) was a Danish-American social reformer, "muckraking" journalist and social documentary photographer. He is known for using his photographic and journalistic talents to help the impoverished in New York City; those impoverished New Yorkers were the subject of most of his prolific writings and photography. He endorsed the implementation of "model tenements" in New York with the help of humanitarian Lawrence Veiller. Additionally, as one of the most famous proponents of the newly practicable casual photography, he is considered one of the fathers of photography due to his very early adoption of flash in photography. While living in New York, Riis experienced poverty and became a police reporter writing about the quality of life in the slums
[...More...]

"Jacob Riis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Leo Tolstoy
Count
Count
Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (/ˈtoʊlstɔɪ, ˈtɒl-/;[1] Russian: Лев Никола́евич Толсто́й, tr. Lev Nikoláyevich Tolstóy, IPA: [lʲef nʲɪkɐˈlaɪvʲɪtɕ tɐlˈstoj] ( listen); 9 September [O.S. 28 August] 1828 – 20 November [O.S. 7 November] 1910), usually referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian writer who is regarded as one of the greatest authors of all time. Born to an aristocratic Russian family in 1828, he is best known for the novels War and Peace
War and Peace
(1869) and Anna Karenina
Anna Karenina
(1877), often cited as pinnacles of realist fiction. He first achieved literary acclaim in his twenties with his semi-autobiographical trilogy, Childhood, Boyhood, and Youth (1852–1856), and Sevastopol Sketches
Sevastopol Sketches
(1855), based upon his experiences in the Crimean War
[...More...]

"Leo Tolstoy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ivan Turgenev
Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev (/tɜːrˈɡɛnjəf, -ˈɡeɪn-/;[1] Russian: Ива́н Серге́евич Турге́нев, IPA: [ɪˈvan sʲɪrˈɡʲeɪvʲɪtɕ tʊrˈɡʲenʲɪf]; November 9 [O.S
[...More...]

"Ivan Turgenev" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cum Laude
Latin
Latin
honors are Latin
Latin
phrases used to indicate the level of distinction with which an academic degree has been earned. This system is primarily used in the United States, many countries of continental Europe, and some Southeastern Asian countries with European colonial history, such as Indonesia and the Philippines, although some institutions use translations of these phrases rather than the Latin originals. The honors distinction should not be confused with the honors degrees offered in some countries. Generally, a college's or university's regulations set out definite criteria to be met in order for a student to obtain a given honors distinction
[...More...]

"Cum Laude" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Settlement Movement
The settlement movement was a reformist social movement, what beginning in the 1880s and peaking around the 1920s in England and the US, with a goal of getting the rich and poor in society to live more closely together in an interdependent community. Its main object was the establishment of "settlement houses" in poor urban areas, in which volunteer middle-class "settlement workers" would live, hoping to share knowledge and culture with, and alleviate the poverty of, their low-income neighbors. The "settlement houses" provided services such as daycare, education, and healthcare to improve the lives of the poor in these areas.[1]Contents1 History1.1 England 1.2 United States 1.3 Russia2 Description 3 Legacy and impact 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] England[edit] The movement started in London in 1884 with the founding of Toynbee Hall
[...More...]

"Settlement Movement" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lower East Side
The Lower East Side, sometimes abbreviated as LES, is a neighborhood in the southeastern part of the New York City
New York City
borough of Manhattan, roughly located between the Bowery
Bowery
and the East River, and Canal Street and Houston Street
[...More...]

"Lower East Side" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Child Labor
Child labour
Child labour
refers to the employment of children in any work that deprives children of their childhood, interferes with their ability to attend regular school, and that is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful.[3] This practice is considered exploitative by many international organisations
[...More...]

"Child Labor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Daily Princetonian
The Daily Princetonian
The Daily Princetonian
is the award-winning daily independent student newspaper of Princeton University. Founded in 1876 and daily since 1892, the Princetonian is among the oldest college newspapers in the country
[...More...]

"The Daily Princetonian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Collier's
Collier's
Collier's
was an American magazine, founded in 1888 by Peter Fenelon Collier
[...More...]

"Collier's" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

New York Evening Post
The New York Post
New York Post
is an American daily newspaper that is primarily distributed in New York City
New York City
and its surrounding area. It is the 13th-oldest newspaper in the United States, and it had the sixth-highest circulation in 2009.[2] Established in 1801 by federalist and Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, it became a respected broadsheet in the 19th century, under the name New York Evening Post. The modern version of the paper is published in tabloid format. In 1976, Rupert Murdoch
Rupert Murdoch
bought the Post for US$30.5 million.[3] Since 1993, Post has been owned by News Corporation and its successor, News Corp, which had owned it previously from 1976 to 1988
[...More...]

"New York Evening Post" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.