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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Phi Beta Kappa
The Phi Beta Kappa Society
Phi Beta Kappa Society
(ΦΒΚ) is the oldest honor society for the liberal arts and sciences in the United States
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "H
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Higher Education In The United States
Higher education
Higher education
in the United States is an optional final stage of formal learning following secondary education
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The College Of New Jersey
The College of New Jersey
New Jersey
(TCNJ) is a public, coeducational university[5] in the Trenton suburb of Ewing Township, New Jersey, United States. TCNJ
TCNJ
was established in 1855 by an act of the New Jersey Legislature
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Artificial Intelligence
Artificial intelligence
Artificial intelligence
(AI, also machine intelligence, MI) is intelligence demonstrated by machines, in contrast to the natural intelligence (NI) displayed by humans and other animals
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TCNJ
The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) is a public, coeducational university[5] in the Trenton suburb of Ewing Township, New Jersey, United States. TCNJ was established in 1855 by an act of the New Jersey Legislature. The institution was the first normal school in the state of New Jersey and the fifth in the United States.[6] Originally located in Trenton proper, the college was moved to its present location in adjacent Ewing Township during the early to mid-1930s. Since its inception, TCNJ has undergone several name changes, the most recent being the 1996 change to its current name from Trenton State College.[7] TCNJ is a selective institution, with a stated mission to keep New Jersey's most talented students in-state for higher education.[8] The college is recognized as one of the best public institutions in the Northern United States and is ranked as the No
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History Of The Telephone
This history of the telephone chronicles the development of the electrical telephone, and includes a brief review of its predecessors.Contents1 Telephone
Telephone
prehistory1.1 Mechanical devices 1.2 Electrical devices2 Invention of the telephone2.1 Telephone
Telephone
exchange3 Early telephone developments 4 Early commercial instruments 5 20th century developments 6 Women's usage in the 20th century 7 21st century developments 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External links Telephone
Telephone
prehistory[edit] Mechanical devices[edit]A 19th century acoustic 'tin can', or 'lover's' telephoneBefore the invention of electromagnetic telephones, mechanical acoustic devices existed for transmitting speech and music over a distance greater than that of normal direct speech
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Feedback
Collective intelligence Collective action Self-organized criticality Herd mentality Phase transition Agent-based modelling Synchronization Ant colony optimization Particle swarm optimization Swarm behaviourNetworks Scale-free networks Social network analysis Small-world networks Community identification Centrality Motifs Graph Theory Scaling Robustness Systems biology Dynamic networks Adaptive networks Evolution
Evolution
and adaptation Artificial neural networks Evolutionary computation Genetic algorithms Genetic programming Artificial life Machine learning Evolutionary developmental biology Artificial intelligence Evolutionary robo
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Logic
Logic
Logic
(from the Ancient Greek: λογική, translit. logikḗ[1]), originally meaning "the word" or "what is spoken", but coming to mean "thought" or "reason", is a subject concerned with the most general laws of truth,[2] and is now generally held to consist of the systematic study of the form of valid inference. A valid inference is one where there is a specific relation of logical support between the assumptions of the inference and its conclusion. (In ordinary discourse, inferences may be signified by words like therefore, hence, ergo, and so on.) There is no universal agreement as to the exact scope and subject matter of logic (see § Rival conceptions, below), but it has traditionally included the classification of arguments, the systematic exposition of the 'logical form' common to all valid arguments, the study of inference, including fallacies, and the study of semantics, including paradoxes
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Swarthmore College
Swarthmore College
Swarthmore College
(/ˈswɔːrθmɔːr/, locally [swɑθ-]) is a private liberal arts college located in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, 11 miles (18 km) southwest of Philadelphia.[6] Founded in 1864, Swarthmore was one of the earliest coeducational colleges in the United States.[7] It was established to be a college "...under the care of Friends, at which an education may be obtained equal to that of the best institutions of learning in our country."[8] By 1906, Swarthmore dropped its religious affiliation, becoming officially non-sectarian.[9] Swarthmore is a member of the Tri-College Consortium, a cooperative arrangement among Swarthmore, Bryn Mawr, and Haverford Colleges
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Philosophy
Philosophy
Philosophy
(from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom"[1][2][3][4]) is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.[5][6] The term was probably coined by Pythagoras
Pythagoras
(c. 570–495 BCE)
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Symbolic Logic
Mathematical logic is a subfield of mathematics exploring the applications of formal logic to mathematics. It bears close connections to metamathematics, the foundations of mathematics, and theoretical computer science.[1] The unifying themes in mathematical logic include the study of the expressive power of formal systems and the deductive power of formal proof systems. Mathematical logic is often divided into the fields of set theory, model theory, recursion theory, and proof theory. These areas share basic results on logic, particularly first-order logic, and definability. In computer science (particularly in the ACM Classification) mathematical logic encompasses additional topics not detailed in this article; see Logic
Logic
in computer science for those. Since its inception, mathematical logic has both contributed to, and has been motivated by, the study of foundations of mathematics
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B.A.
A Bachelor of Arts (BA or AB, from the Latin
Latin
baccalaureus artium or artium baccalaureus) is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors
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Thesis
A thesis or dissertation[1] is a document submitted in support of candidature for an academic degree or professional qualification presenting the author's research and findings.[2] In some contexts, the word "thesis" or a cognate is used for part of a bachelor's or master's course, while "dissertation" is normally applied to a doctorate, while in other contexts, the reverse is true.[3] The term graduate thesis is sometimes used to refer to both master's theses and doctoral dissertations.[4] The required complexity or quality of research of a thesis or dissertation can vary by country, university, or program, and the required minimum study period may thus vary significantly in duration. The word "dissertation" can at times be used to describe a treatise without relation to obtaining an academic degree
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