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Erinys
In Greek mythology
Greek mythology
the Erinyes
Erinyes
(/ɪˈrɪniˌiːz/; sing. Erinys /ɪˈrɪnɪs/;[1] Greek: Ἐρῑνύες [ῠ], pl. of Ἐρῑνύς [ῡ], Erinys),[2] also known as the Furies, were female chthonic deities of vengeance; they were sometimes referred to as "infernal goddesses" (χθόνιαι θεαί)
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Furies (other)
The Furies (Erinyes) are the deities of vengeance in Greek mythology. Furies may also refer to:The Eumenides, or The Furies, a play by Aeschylus Furies (Shannara), characters in the Shannara book series by Terry Brooks The Furies, characters in the Codex Alera book series by Jim Butcher The Furies, a film montage by Slavko Vorkapić which opened the 1934 film Crime Without Passion The Furies (1950 film), a Western by Anthony Mann The Furies (1930 film), a murder mystery "The Furies", a 1965 science fiction novelette by Roger Zelazny The Furies, a 1966 science fiction novel by Keith Roberts The Furies (novel), a 1976 historical novel by John Jakes Furies, a 1977 animated short film by Sara Petty The Furies, a 2009 historical novel by Bill Napier The Furies, newspaper of The Furies Collective, a Washington DC-based lesbian organization The Furys, a 1935 novel by James Hanley
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Virgil
Publius Vergilius Maro (Classical Latin: [ˈpuː.blɪ.ʊs wɛrˈɡɪ.lɪ.ʊs ˈma.roː]; traditional dates October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC[1]), usually called Virgil
Virgil
or Vergil /ˈvɜːrdʒɪl/ in English, was an ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period. He wrote three of the most famous poems in Latin
Latin
literature: the Eclogues
Eclogues
(or Bucolics), the Georgics, and the epic Aeneid. A number of minor poems, collected in the Appendix Vergiliana, are sometimes attributed to him.[2][3] Virgil
Virgil
is traditionally ranked as one of Rome's greatest poets. His Aeneid
Aeneid
has been considered the national epic of ancient Rome
Rome
since the time of its composition
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Maurus Servius Honoratus
Maurus Servius Honoratus
Maurus Servius Honoratus
was a late fourth-century and early fifth-century grammarian, with the contemporary reputation of being the most learned man of his generation in Italy; he was the author of a set of commentaries on the works of Virgil
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Hesiod
Hesiod
Hesiod
(/ˈhiːsiəd/ or /ˈhɛsiəd/;[1] Greek: Ἡσίοδος Hēsíodos) was a Greek poet generally thought by scholars to have been active between 750 and 650 BC, around the same time as Homer.[2][3] He is generally regarded as the first written poet in the Western tradition to regard himself as an individual persona with an active role to play in his subject.[4] Ancient authors credited Hesiod and
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Theogony
The Theogony
Theogony
(Greek: Θεογονία, Theogonía, Attic Greek: [tʰeoɡoníaː], i.e. "the genealogy or birth of the gods"[1]) is a poem by Hesiod
Hesiod
(8th – 7th century BC) describing the origins and genealogies of the Greek gods, composed c. 700 BC
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Cronus
In Greek mythology, Cronus, Cronos, or Kronos (/ˈkroʊnəs/ or /ˈkroʊnɒs/ from Greek: Κρόνος, Krónos), was the leader and youngest of the first generation of Titans, the divine descendants of Uranus, the sky, and Gaia, the earth. He overthrew his father and ruled during the mythological Golden Age, until he was overthrown by his own son Zeus
Zeus
and imprisoned in Tartarus
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Uranus (mythology)
Uranus
Uranus
(/ˈjʊərənəs, jʊəˈreɪnəs/; Ancient Greek Οὐρανός, Ouranos [uranós] meaning "sky" or "heaven") was the primal Greek god personifying the sky. His name in Roman mythology
Roman mythology
was Caelus.[2] In Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
literature, Uranus
Uranus
or Father Sky
Sky
was the son and husband of Gaia, Mother Earth. According to Hesiod's Theogony, Uranus
Uranus
was conceived by Gaia alone, but other sources cite Aether as his father.[3] Uranus
Uranus
and Gaia were the parents of the first generation of Titans, and the ancestors of most of the Greek gods, but no cult addressed directly to Uranus
Uranus
survived into Classical times,[4] and Uranus
Uranus
does not appear among the usual themes of Greek painted pottery
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Giants (Greek Mythology)
In Greek and Roman Mythology, the Giants, also called Gigantes (jye-GAHN-tees or gee-GAHN-tees; Greek: Γίγαντες, Gígantes, singular: Γίγας, Gígas) were a race of great strength and aggression, though not necessarily of great size, known for the Gigantomachy
Gigantomachy
(Gigantomachia), their battle with the Olympian gods.[2] According to Hesiod, the Giants were the offspring of Gaia (Earth), born from the blood that fell when Uranus (Sky) was castrated by his Titan son Cronus.[3] Archaic and Classical representations show Gigantes as man-sized hoplites (heavily armed ancient Greek foot soldiers) fully human in form.[4] Later representations (after c
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Meliae
In Greek mythology, the Meliae (/ˈmiːliˌiː/; Ancient Greek: Μελίαι Meliai or Μελιάδες Meliades) were usually considered to be the nymphs of the ash tree, whose name they shared.[1]Contents1 Mythology 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksMythology[edit] According to Hesiod, the Meliae (probably meaning all tree-nymphs) were born from the drops of blood that fell on Gaia [Earth] when Cronus
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Aphrodite
Aphrodite
Aphrodite
(/æfrəˈdaɪti/ ( listen) af-rə-DY-tee; Greek: Ἀφροδίτη Aphrodítē) is the ancient Greek goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans. The cult of Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was largely derived from that of the Phoenician goddess Astarte, a cognate of the East Semitic goddess Ishtar, whose cult was based on the Sumerian cult of Inanna. Aphrodite's main cult centers were Cythera, Cyprus, Corinth, and Athens. Her main festival was the Aphrodisia, which was celebrated annually in midsummer. In Laconia, Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was worshipped as a warrior goddess
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Nyx
Nyx
Nyx
(/nɪks/;[1] Ancient Greek: Νύξ, "Night";[2] Latin: Nox) is the Greek goddess (or personification) of the night. A shadowy figure, Nyx stood at or near the beginning of creation and mothered other personified deities such as Hypnos
Hypnos
(Sleep) and Thanatos
Thanatos
(Death), with Erebus
Erebus
(Darkness)
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Alexandria
Alexandria
Alexandria
(/ˌælɪɡˈzændriə/ or /-ˈzɑːnd-/;[3] Arabic: الإسكندرية al-ʾIskandariyya; Egyptian Arabic: إسكندرية Eskendria; Coptic: Ⲁⲗⲉⲝⲁⲛⲇⲣⲓⲁ, Ⲣⲁⲕⲟⲧⲉ Alexandria, Rakotə) is the second-largest city in Egypt
Egypt
and a major economic centre, extending about 32 km (20 mi) along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
in the north central part of the country. Its low elevation on the Nile delta
Nile delta
makes it highly vulnerable to rising sea levels. Alexandria
Alexandria
is an important industrial center because of its natural gas and oil pipelines from Suez. Alexandria
Alexandria
is also a popular tourist destination. Alexandria
Alexandria
was founded around a small, ancient Egyptian town c. 331 BC by Alexander the Great
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Walter Burkert
Walter Burkert (German: [ˈbʊɐ̯kɐt]; born 2 February 1931, Neuendettelsau; died 11 March 2015, Zurich)[1] was a German scholar of Greek mythology
Greek mythology
and cult. A professor of classics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, he taught in the UK and the US
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Alecto
Alecto (Ancient Greek: Ἀληκτώ, English translation: "the implacable or unceasing anger") is one of the Erinyes, or Furies, in Greek mythology.Contents1 Family and Description 2 Alecto in Mythology 3 In literature 4 See also 5 ReferencesFamily and Description[edit] According to Hesiod, Alecto was the daughter of Gaea fertilized by the blood spilled from Uranus when Cronus
Cronus
castrated him. She is the sister of Tisiphone, the embodiment of murder, and Megaera, the embodiment of jealousy. Alecto's job as a Fury is castigating the moral crimes (such as anger) of humans, especially if they are against others. The Furies had snakes for hair and blood dripped from their eyes. In addition they had bats' wings and dogs' heads. Alecto's function is similar to Nemesis, with the difference that Nemesis's function is to castigate crimes against the gods, not mortals
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Megaera
Megaera
Megaera
(/məˈdʒɪərə/; Ancient Greek: Μέγαιρα, English translation: "the jealous one"[1]) is one of the Erinyes, Eumenides or "Furies" in Greek mythology. Lamprière's Classical Dictionary states "According to the most received opinions, they were three in number, Tisiphone, " Megaera
Megaera
... daughter of Nox and Acheron",[2] and Alecto".[3] Megaera
Megaera
is the cause of jealousy and envy, and punishes people who commit crimes, especially marital infidelity
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