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Ericsson
Ericsson
Ericsson
(Telefonaktiebolaget L. M. Ericsson) is a multinational networking and telecommunications company headquartered in Stockholm, Sweden. The company offers services, software and infrastructure in information and communications technology for telecommunications operators, traditional telecommunications and Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP) networking equipment, mobile and fixed broadband, operations and business support services, cable television, IPTV, video systems, and an extensive services operation. Ericsson
Ericsson
had 35% market share in the 2G/3G/4G mobile network infrastructure market in 2012.[3] The company was founded in 1876 by Lars Magnus Ericsson;[4] as of 2016[update] it is headquartered in Stockholm, Sweden
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Equity (finance)
In accounting, equity (or owner's equity) is the difference between the value of the assets and the value of the liabilities of something owned. It is governed by the following equation: Equity = Assets − Liabilities displaystyle text Equity = text Assets - text Liabilities For example, if someone owns a car worth $15,000 (an asset), but owes $5,000 on a loan against that car (a liability), the car represents $10,000 of equity. Equity can be negative if liabilities exceed assets. Shareholders' equity (or stockholders' equity, shareholders' funds, shareholders' capital or similar terms) represents the equity of a company as divided among shareholders of common or preferred stock. Negative shareholders' equity is often referred to as a shareholders' deficit. Alternatively, equity can also refer to the capital stock of a corporation. The value of the stock depends on the corporation's future economic prospects
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Telegraph
Telegraphy
Telegraphy
(from Greek: τῆλε têle, "at a distance" and γράφειν gráphein, "to write") is the long-distance transmission of textual or symbolic (as opposed to verbal or audio) messages without the physical exchange of an object bearing the message. Thus semaphore is a method of telegraphy, whereas pigeon post is not. Telegraphy
Telegraphy
requires that the method used for encoding the message be known to both sender and receiver. Many methods are designed according to the limits of the signalling medium used. The use of smoke signals, beacons, reflected light signals, and flag semaphore signals are early examples. In the 19th century, the harnessing of electricity led to the invention of electrical telegraphy. The advent of radio in the early 20th century brought about radiotelegraphy and other forms of wireless telegraphy
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Earnings Before Interest And Taxes
In accounting and finance, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), is a measure of a firm's profit that includes all expenses except interest and income tax expenses.[1] It is the difference between operating revenues and operating expenses. When a firm does not have non-operating income, operating income is sometimes used as a synonym for EBIT and operating profit.[2]EBIT = revenue – operating expenses (OPEX)Operating income = revenue – operating expenses[1] A professional investor contemplating a change to the capital structure of a firm (e.g., through a leveraged buyout) first evaluates a firm's fundamental earnings potential (reflected by earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and EBIT), and then determines the optimal use of debt vs. equity. To calculate EBIT, expenses (e.g
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Net Income
In business, net income (total comprehensive income, net earnings, net profit, informally, bottom line) is an entity's income minus cost of goods sold, expenses and taxes for an accounting period.[1] It is computed as the residual of all revenues and gains over all expenses and losses for the period,[2] and has also been defined as the net increase in shareholders' equity that results from a company's operations.[3] In the context of the presentation of financial statements, the IFRS Foundation
IFRS Foundation
defines net income as synonymous with profit and loss.[1] Net income
Net income
is the same as net profit but a distinct accounting concept from profit
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Asset
In financial accounting, an asset is an economic resource. Anything tangible or intangible that can be owned or controlled to produce value and that is held by a company to produce positive economic value is an asset. Simply stated, assets represent value of ownership that can be converted into cash (although cash itself is also considered an asset).[1] The balance sheet of a firm records the monetary[2] value of the assets owned by that firm. It covers money and other valuables belonging to an individual or to a business.[1] One can classify assets into two major asset classes: tangible assets and intangible assets. Tangible assets contain various subclasses, including current assets and fixed assets.[3] Current assets include inventory, while fixed assets include such items as buildings and equipment.[4] Intangible assets are nonphysical resources and rights that have a value to the firm because they give the firm some kind of advantage in the marketplace
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Subsidiary
A subsidiary, subsidiary company or daughter company[1][2][3] is a company that is owned or controlled by another company, which is called the parent company, parent, or holding company.[4][5] The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise. In some cases, particularly in the music and book publishing industries, subsidiaries are referred to as imprints. In the United States railroad industry, an operating subsidiary is a company that is a subsidiary but operates with its own identity, locomotives and rolling stock
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Telephone Switchboard
A telephone switchboard is a telecommunications system used in the public switched telephone network or in enterprises to interconnect circuits of telephones to establish telephone calls between the subscribers or users, or between other exchanges. The switchboard was an essential component of a manual telephone exchange, and was operated by switchboard operators who used electrical cords or switches to establish the connections. The electromechanical automatic telephone exchange, invented by Almon Strowger in 1888, gradually replaced manual switchboards in central telephone exchanges around the world. In 1919, the Bell System
Bell System
in Canada also adopted automatic switching as its future technology, after years of reliance on manual systems. Nevertheless, many manual branch exchanges remained operational into the second half of the 20th century in many enterprises
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Nordic Countries
The Nordic countries or the Nordics[1] are a geographical and cultural region in Northern Europe and the North Atlantic, where they are most commonly known as Norden (literally "the North"). The term includes Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, including Greenland and Faroe Islands—which are both constituent countries within the Kingdom of Denmark—and the Åland Islands.[2] Scandinavians comprise over three quarters of the region's population and is thus the largest group by far, followed by Finns, who comprise the majority in Finland; other groups are indigenous minorities such as the Greenlandic Inuit and the Sami people, and recent immigrants and their descendants. The native languages are Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, and Faroese, all North Germanic languages rooted in Old Norse. Native non-Germanic languages are Finnish, Greenlandic and several Sami languages. The main religion is Lutheran Christianity
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Internet Protocol
The Internet
Internet
Protocol (IP) is the principal communications protocol in the Internet protocol suite
Internet protocol suite
for relaying packets across network boundaries. Its routing function enables internetworking, and essentially establishes the Internet. IP has the task of delivering packets from the source host to the destination host solely based on the IP addresses in the packet headers. For this purpose, IP defines packet structures that encapsulate the data to be delivered. It also defines addressing methods that are used to label the datagram with source and destination information. Historically, IP was the connectionless datagram service in the original Transmission Control Program introduced by Vint Cerf
Vint Cerf
and Bob Kahn in 1974; the other being the connection-oriented Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)
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Walnut
A walnut is the nut of any tree of the genus Juglans
Juglans
(Family Juglandaceae), particularly the Persian or English walnut, Juglans regia. Technically a walnut is the seed of a drupe or drupaceous nut, and thus not a true botanical nut. It is used for food after being processed while green for pickled walnuts or after full ripening for its nutmeat. Nutmeat of the eastern black walnut from the Juglans nigra is less commercially available, as are butternut nutmeats from Juglans
Juglans
cinerea
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Multimedia
Multimedia
Multimedia
is content that uses a combination of different content forms such as text, audio, images, animations, video and interactive content. Multimedia
Multimedia
contrasts with media that use only rudimentary computer displays such as text-only or traditional forms of printed or hand-produced material. Multimedia
Multimedia
can be recorded and played, displayed, interacted with or accessed by information content processing devices, such as computerized and electronic devices, but can also be part of a live performance. Multimedia
Multimedia
devices are electronic media devices used to store and experience multimedia content. Multimedia
Multimedia
is distinguished from mixed media in fine art; for example, by including audio it has a broader scope
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Carl Johan Andersson
Karl John (Karl Johan) Andersson (4 March 1827 in Värmland, Sweden – 9 July 1867 in Angola) was a Swedish explorer, hunter and trader as well as an amateur naturalist and ornithologist. He is most famous for the many books he published about his travels, and for being one of the most notable explorers of southern Africa, mostly in present-day Namibia.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Explorations 1.3 Death2 Bibliography2.1 Publications by Andersson 2.2 Published letters and correspondence 2.3 Publications about Andersson3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Karl Johan Andersson was born on 4 March 1827 in Värmland in Sweden. He was the illegitimate child of the English bear hunter Llewellyn Lloyd and Lloyd's Swedish servant. Andersson grew up in Sweden
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Bell Telephone Company
The Bell Telephone Company, a common law joint stock company, was organized in Boston, Massachusetts
Boston, Massachusetts
on July 9, 1877, by Alexander Graham Bell's father-in-law Gardiner Greene Hubbard, who also helped organize a sister company — the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company
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Siemens AG
Siemens
Siemens
AG (German pronunciation: [ˈziːmɛns])[2] is a German conglomerate company headquartered in Berlin
Berlin
and
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Swedish Railways
SJ (formally SJ AB) is a government-owned passenger train operator in Sweden. SJ was created in 2000, out of the public transport division of Statens Järnvägar, when the former government agency was divided into six separate government-owned limited companies.Contents1 Overview 2 Rolling stock2.1 SJ higher speed services (SJ Snabbtåg) 2.2 SJ InterCity 2.3 SJ Regional3 Services3.1 SJ Night train 3.2 SJ InterCity 3.3 SJ Regional 3.4 SJ higher speed trains4 Identity document required for travel 5 Photogallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOverview[edit] SJ's operations fall broadly into subsidised and unsubsidised services. The unsubsidised services was until 2011 monopoly and consist mainly of the X 2000 higher speed train network. The subsidised trains are awarded through competitive bids
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