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Erhard Weigel
Erhard Weigel
Erhard Weigel
(December 16, 1625 – March 20, 1699) was a German mathematician, astronomer and philosopher.Contents1 Biography1.1 Timeline2 Legacy 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Weigel earned his MA (1650) and his habilitation (1652) from the University of Leipzig. From 1653 until his death he was professor of mathematics at Jena
Jena
University. He was the teacher of Leibniz in summer 1663,[3] and other notable students. He also worked to make science more widely accessible to the public, and what would today be considered a populariser of science. He concurred with Jakob Ellrod's "Mittel-Calendar", and with the advocacy of Leibniz and others, that the date of Easter
Easter
should be based on the astronomical measurement of the spring equinox and the next full moon
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Pietro Della Vecchia
Pietro della Vecchia, Pietro della Vècchia or Pietro Vècchia, formerly incorrectly called Pietro Muttoni[1] (Vicenza, 1603 – Venice, 8 September 1678) was a versatile Italian painter who worked in many genres and created altar pieces, portraits, genre scenes and grotesques. He also created pastiches of the work of leading Italian painters of the 16th century. The artist designed cartoons for mosaics and worked as an art restorer. Della Vecchia was also sought after as an art expert and did expert valuations of artworks. He worked most of his life in Venice
Venice
and its environs except for a brief stay in Rome.[2]Contents1 Life 2 Work 3 Further reading 4 Notes 5 External linksLife[edit]A dispute among the doctorsThe life of Pietro della Vecchia
Pietro della Vecchia
is not very well documented and the information available is not always reliable
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Siméon Poisson
Baron
Baron
Siméon Denis Poisson
Siméon Denis Poisson
FRS FRSE
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Wunsiedel
Wunsiedel
Wunsiedel
is the seat of the Upper Franconian district of Wunsiedel
Wunsiedel
in northeast Bavaria, Germany
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Halle, Saxony-Anhalt
Halle (Saale)[2] (German: Halle (Saale), pronounced [ˈhalə ˈzaːlə] ( listen)) is a city in the southern part of the German state Saxony-Anhalt. Halle is an economic and educational center in central-eastern Germany. The University of Halle- Wittenberg
Wittenberg
is the largest university in Saxony-Anhalt
Saxony-Anhalt
and one of the oldest universities in Germany, and a nurturing ground for the local startup ecosystem
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Christian Huygens
Christiaan Huygens, FRS (/ˈhaɪɡənz, ˈhɔɪɡənz/[3] HY-guns or HOY-guns; Dutch: [ˈɦœyɣə(n)s] ( listen); Latin: Hugenius; 14 April 1629 – 8 July 1695) was a Dutch physicist, mathematician, astronomer and inventor, who is widely regarded as one of the greatest scientists of all time and a major figure in the scientific revolution. He is known particularly as a physicist, astronomer, probabilist and horologist. In physics, Huygens made groundbreaking contributions in optics and mechanics, while as an astronomer Huygens is chiefly known for his studies of the rings of Saturn
Saturn
and the discovery of its moon Titan. As an inventor, Huygens improved the design of the telescope with the invention of the Huygenian eyepiece. His most famous invention, however, was the invention of the pendulum clock in 1656, which was a breakthrough in timekeeping and became the most accurate timekeeper for almost 300 years[citation needed]
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Mathematics Genealogy Project
The Mathematics
Mathematics
Genealogy Project is a web-based database for the academic genealogy of mathematicians.[1][2][3] By 3 January 2018, it contained information on 222,193 mathematical scientists who contributed to research-level mathematics
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Joseph-Louis Lagrange
Joseph-Louis Lagrange
Joseph-Louis Lagrange
(/ləˈɡrɑːndʒ/[1] or /ləˈɡreɪndʒ/;[2] French: [lagrɑ̃ʒ]; born Giuseppe Lodovico Lagrangia[3][need quotation to verify][4] or Giuseppe Ludovico De la Grange Tournier,[5] Turin, 25 January 1736 – Paris, 10 April 1813; also reported as Giuseppe Luigi Lagrange[6] or Lagrangia[7]) was an Italian Enlightenment Era
Enlightenment Era
mathematician and astronomer. He made significant contributions to the fields of analysis, number theory, and both classical and celestial mechanics. In 1766, on the recommendation of Euler
Euler
and d'Alembert, Lagrange succeeded Euler
Euler
as the director of mathematics at the Prussian Academy of Sciences in Berlin, Prussia, where he stayed for over twenty years, producing volumes of work and winning several prizes of the French Academy of Sciences
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Leonhard Euler
Leonhard Euler
Leonhard Euler
(/ˈɔɪlər/ OY-lər;[2] Swiss Standard German: [ˈɔɪlər] ( listen); German Standard German: [ˈɔʏlɐ] ( listen); 15 April 1707 – 18 September 1783) was a Swiss mathematician, physicist, astronomer, logician and engineer, who made important and influential discoveries in many branches of mathematics, such as infinitesimal calculus and graph theory, while also making pioneering contributions to several branches such as topology and analytic number theory. He also introduced much of the modern mathematical terminology and notation, particularly for mathematical analysis, such as the notion of a mathematical function.[3] He is also known for his work in mechanics, fluid dynamics, optics, astronomy, and music theory.[4] Euler was one of the most eminent mathematicians of the 18th century and is held to be one of the greatest in history
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Fields Medal
The Fields Medal
Fields Medal
is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians under 40 years of age at the International Congress of the International Mathematical Union (IMU), a meeting that takes place every four years (on even years). The Fields Medal
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Gregorian Calendar
The Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
is internationally the most widely used civil calendar.[1][2][Note 1] It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October
October
1582. It was a refinement to the Julian calendar[3] involving an approximately 0.002% correction in the length of the calendar year. The motivation for the reform was to stop the drift of the calendar with respect to the equinoxes and solstices—particularly the northern vernal equinox, which helps set the date for Easter. Transition to the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
would restore the holiday to the time of the year in which it was celebrated when introduced by the early Church. The reform was adopted initially by the Catholic countries of Europe
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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LIBRIS
LIBRIS (Library Information System) is a Swedish national union catalogue maintained by the National Library of Sweden
Sweden
in Stockholm.[1] It is possible to freely search about 6.5 million titles nationwide.[2] In addition to bibliographic records, one for each book or publication, LIBRIS also contains an authority file of people
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