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Erasmus
Catholicism portal Philosophy portalv t eDesiderius Erasmus
Erasmus
Roterodamus (/ˌdɛzɪˈdɪəriəs ɪˈræzməs/; 28 October 1466[1][2] – 12 July 1536), known as Erasmus
Erasmus
or Erasmus of Rotterdam,[note 1] was a Dutch Renaissance
Renaissance
humanist, Catholic priest, social critic, teacher, and theologian. Erasmus
Erasmus
was a classical scholar and wrote in a pure Latin style. Among humanists he enjoyed the sobriquet "Prince of the Humanists", and has been called "the crowning glory of the Christian humanists".[3] Using humanist techniques for working on texts, he prepared important new Latin and Greek editions of the New Testament, which raised questions that would be influential in the Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
and Catholic Counter-Reformation
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Jan Standonck
Jan, JaN or JAN may refer to: Acronyms[edit]Jackson, Mississippi (Amtrak station), US, Amtrak station code JAN Jackson-Evers International Airport, Mississippi, US, IATA code Jabhat al-Nusra
Jabhat al-Nusra
(JaN), a Syrian militant group Japanese Article Number, a barcode standard compatible with EAN Japanese Accepted Name, a Japanese nonproprietary drug name Job Accommodation Network, US, for people with disabilities Joint Army Navy, US standards for electronic color codes, etc. Journal of Advanced NursingPeople[edit]
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Burgundian Netherlands
In the history of the Low Countries, the Burgundian Netherlands (French: Pays-Bas Bourguignons, Dutch: Bourgondische Nederlanden, Luxembourgish: Burgundeschen Nidderlanden, Walloon: Bas Payis borguignons) were a number of Imperial and French fiefs ruled in personal union by the House of Valois-Burgundy
House of Valois-Burgundy
and their Habsburg heirs in the period from 1384 to 1482
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Augustinians
Catholicism portal Philosophy portalThe term Augustinians, named after Augustine of Hippo
Augustine of Hippo
(354–430), applies to two distinct types of Catholic religious orders and some Anglican religious orders. Within Anglicanism the Rule of St. Augustine is followed only by women, who form several different communities of Augustinian nuns
Augustinian nuns
in the Anglican Communion. Within Roman Catholicism Augustinians
Augustinians
may be members of either one of two separate and distinct types of Order:Several mendicant Orders of friars, who lived a mixed religious life of contemplation and apostolic ministry and follow the Rule of St. Augustine, a brief document providing guidelines for living in a religious community. The largest and most familiar, originally known as the Hermits of St
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Old Swiss Confederacy
The Old Swiss Confederacy
Old Swiss Confederacy
(Modern German: Alte Eidgenossenschaft; historically Eidgenossenschaft, after the Reformation also République des Suisses, Res publica Helvetiorum "Republic of the Swiss") was a loose confederation of independent small states (cantons, German Orte or Stände[2]) within the Holy Roman Empire. It is the precursor of the modern state of Switzerland. It formed during the 14th century, from a nucleus in what is now Central Switzerland, expanding to include the cities of Zürich
Zürich
and Berne
Berne
by the middle of the century
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Wolfgang Capito
Wolfgang Fabricius Capito (also Koepfel) (c. 1478 – November 1541) was a German religious reformer.Contents1 His life and work 2 Works 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHis life and work[edit] Capito was born circa 1478 to a smith at Hagenau
Hagenau
in Alsace. He attended the famous Latin school in Pforzheim.[1]:111 He was educated for the medical profession but also studied law.[citation needed] He received a doctorate in theology at Freiburg.[1]:111 Having joined the Benedictines, taught for some time at Freiburg
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Collège De Montaigu
In France, secondary education is in two stages:collèges (French pronunciation: ​[kɔlɛʒ]) cater for the first four years of secondary education from the ages of 11 to 15. lycées ([lise]) provide a three-year course of further secondary education for children between the ages of 15 and 18
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Epicureanism
Epicureanism
Epicureanism
is a system of philosophy based upon the teachings of the ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus, founded around 307 BC. Epicurus was an atomic materialist, following in the steps of Democritus. His materialism led him to a general attack on superstition and divine intervention. Following Aristippus—about whom very little is known— Epicurus
Epicurus
believed that what he called "pleasure" was the greatest good, but that the way to attain such pleasure was to live modestly, to gain knowledge of the workings of the world, and to limit one's desires. This would lead one to attain a state of tranquility (ataraxia) and freedom from fear as well as an absence of bodily pain (aponia). The combination of these two states constitutes happiness in its highest form
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Western Philosophy
Western philosophy
Western philosophy
is the philosophical thought and work of the Western world. Historically, the term refers to the philosophical thinking of Western culture, beginning with Greek philosophy
Greek philosophy
of the Pre-Socratics such as Thales
Thales
(c. 624 – c. 546 BC) and Pythagoras (c. 570 BC – c. 495 BC), and eventually covering a large area of the globe.[1][2] The word philosophy itself originated from the Ancient Greek: philosophia (φιλοσοφία), literally, "the love of wisdom" (φιλεῖν philein, "to love" and σοφία sophia, "wisdom"). The scope of philosophy in the ancient understanding, and the writings of (at least some of) the ancient philosophers, were all intellectual endeavors
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Scholasticism
Catholicism portal Philosophy
Philosophy
portalv t e Scholasticism
Scholasticism
is a method of critical thought which dominated teaching by the academics ("scholastics", or "schoolmen") of medieval universities in Europe from about 1100 to 1700, and a program of employing that method in articulating and defending dogma in an increasingly pluralistic context. It originated as an outgrowth of and a departure from Christian monastic schools at the earliest European universities.[1] The first institutions in the West to be considered universities were established in Italy, France, Spain, and England in the late 11th and 12th centuries for the study of arts, law, medicine, and theology,[2] such as Schola Medica Salernitana, the University
University
of Bologna, and the University
University
of Paris
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School Of Salamanca
Catholicism portal Philosophy portalv t eThe School of Salamanca
School of Salamanca
(Spanish: Escuela de Salamanca) is the Renaissance
Renaissance
of thought in diverse intellectual areas by Spanish and Portuguese theologians, rooted in the intellectual and pedagogical work of Francisco de Vitoria. From the beginning of the 16th century the traditional Catholic conception of man and of his relation to God and to the world had been assaulted by the rise of humanism, by the Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
and by the new geographical discoveries and their consequences. These new problems were addressed by the School of Salamanca
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Alexander Hegius
Alexander Hegius von Heek (?1433/1439/1440? – 7 December 1498) was a German humanist, so called from his birthplace Heek (located near Ahaus, then in the Duchy of Westphalia). In his youth he was a pupil of Rodolphus Agricola[1] and Thomas à Kempis. Thomas à Kempis was at that time canon of the convent of St. Agnes at Zwolle. In 1474 he settled down at Deventer in the Netherlands, where he either founded or succeeded to the headship of a school, which became famous for the number of its distinguished alumni. First and foremost of these was Erasmus; others were Hermann von dem Busche and Murmellius, the missionaries of humanism, Conrad Goclenius (Gockelen), Conrad Mutianus (Muth von Mudt) and Pope Adrian VI.[2] His writings, consisting of short poems, philosophical essays, grammatical notes and letters, were published after his death by his pupil Jacobus Faber
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Catholic Personalism
David Brooks, The Road to Character. 2015.  Personalism is a philosophical school of thought searching to describe the uniqueness of 1) God
God
as Supreme Person
Person
or 2) a human person in the world of nature, specifically in relation to animals
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Giovanni Pico Della Mirandola
Giovanni Pico della Mirandola
Mirandola
(Italian: [dʒoˈvanni ˈpiːko della miˈrandola]; 24 February 1463 – 17 November 1494) was an Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
nobleman and philosopher.[1] He was the founder of the tradition of Christian Kabbalah, a key tenet of early modern Western esotericism
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Catholic Social Teaching
Catholicism portal Philosophy portalv t e Catholic social teaching
Catholic social teaching
is the Catholic doctrines on matters of human dignity and common good in society. The ideas address oppression, the role of the state, subsidiarity, social organization, concern for social justice, and issues of wealth distribution. Its foundations are widely considered to have been laid by Pope Leo XIII's 1891 encyclical letter Rerum novarum, which advocated economic distributism, criticized both capitalism (not market economics per se), and socialism
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Virtue Ethics
Virtue
Virtue
ethics (or aretaic ethics[1] /ˌærəˈteɪ.ɪk/, from Greek ἀρετή (arete)) are normative ethical theories which emphasize virtues of mind and character. Virtue
Virtue
ethicists discuss the nature and definition of virtues and other related problems
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