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Eran
Eran
Eran
is an ancient town and archaeological site in Sagar district
Sagar district
of Madhya Pradesh, India.[1] It was one of the ancient mints for Indian dynasties as evidenced by the diverse coins excavated here
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Kankali Tila
Kankali Tila
Kankali Tila
(also Kankali mound or Jaini mound) is a mound located at Mathura
Mathura
in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. The name of the mound is derived from a modern temple of Hindu goddess Kankali. The famous Jain stupa was excavated here in 1890-91 by Alois Anton Führer
Alois Anton Führer
(Dr. Führer).[2] The mound almost rectangular in shape is 500 feet long by 350 feet broad.[2] Kankali Tila
Kankali Tila
brought forth many treasures of Jain art. The archaeological findings testifies the existence of two Jain temples and stupas. Numerous Jain sculptures, Ayagapattas (tablet of homage),[3] pillars, crossbeams and lintels were found during archaeological excavations
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Jagir
A jagir (IAST: Jāgīr), also spelled as jageer,[1] was a type of feudal land grant in South Asia
South Asia
at the foundation of its Jagirdar system.[2][3] It developed during the Islamic rule era of the Indian subcontinent, starting in the early 13th century, wherein the powers to govern and collect tax from an estate was granted to an appointee of the state.[2] The tenants were considered to be in the servitude of the jagirdar.[4] There were two forms of jagir, one being conditional and the other unconditional. The conditional jagir required the governing family to maintain troops and provide their service to the state when asked.[2][3] The land grant was called iqta, usually for a holder's lifetime, and the land reverted to the state upon the death of the jagirdar.[2][5] The jagirdar system was introduced by the Delhi
Delhi
Sultanate,[2] and continued during the Mughal Empire,[6] but with a difference
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Mandapa
Mandapa
Mandapa
(also spelled mantapa or mandapam) in Indian architecture
Indian architecture
is a pillared outdoor hall or pavilion for public rituals.[1]Contents1 Temple architecture 2 Name variations 3 Other languages 4 Notes 5 See also 6 External linksTemple architecture[edit] Mandapa
Mandapa
porch, ShimogaIn the Hindu temple
Hindu temple
the mandapa is a porch-like structure through the (gopuram) (ornate gateway) and leading to the temple. It is used for religious dancing and music and is part of the basic temple compound.[2] The prayer hall was generally built in front of the temple's sanctum sanctorum (garbhagriha). A large temple would have many mandapas.[3] If a temple has more than one mandapa, each one is allocated for a different function and given a name to reflect its use
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Coining (mint)
In minting, coining or coinage is the process of manufacturing coins using a kind of stamping which is now generically known in metalworking as "coining". This process is different from cast coinage, and can be classified in hammered coinage or hammering and milled coinage or milling. A coin die is one of the two metallic pieces that are used to strike a coin, one per each side of the coin. A die contains an inverse version of the image to be struck on the coin
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Coimbatore
Area Note 1: The pre-expansion area of city limits was 105.6 sq.km. The 2010 expansion order added 12 local bodies and increased the total area to 265.36 sq.km. In 2011, three of the local bodies Vellalore (16.64 sq.km), Chinniampalayam
Chinniampalayam
(9.27 sq.km) and Perur
Perur
(6.40 sq.km) were dropped from the expansion and Vellakinar (9.20 sq.km) and Chennavedampatti (4.5 sq.km) were added
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Tamil Nadu
^# Jana Gana Mana
Jana Gana Mana
is the national anthem, while "Invocation to Tamil Mother" is the state song/anthem. ^† Established in 1773; Madras State was formed in 1950 and renamed as Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
on 14 January 1969[9] ^^ Tamil is the official language of the state. English is declared as an additional official language for communication purposes.[8]SymbolsEmblem Srivilliputhur
Srivilliputhur
Andal templeLanguageTamilSong"Invocation to Goddess Tamil"DanceBharathanattiyamAnimalNilgiri tahrBirdEmerald doveFlowerGloriosa lilyTreePalm treeSportKabaddi Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
(Tamil pronunciation: [t̪amiɻ n̪aːᶑu] ( listen) literally 'The Land of Tamils' or 'Tamil Country') is one of the 29 states of India. Its capital and largest city is Chennai
Chennai
(formerly known as Madras)
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Malwa
Malwa
Malwa
is a historical region of west-central India
India
occupying a plateau of volcanic origin. Geologically, the Malwa
Malwa
Plateau
Plateau
generally refers to the volcanic upland north of the Vindhya Range. Politically and administratively, the historical Malwa
Malwa
region includes districts of central part of western Madhya Pradesh
Madhya Pradesh
and parts of south-eastern Rajasthan. The definition of Malwa
Malwa
is sometimes extended to include the Nimar region south of the Vindhyas. The Malwa
Malwa
region had been a separate political unit from the time of the ancient Malava Kingdom
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Kolkata
Kolkata
Kolkata
/koʊlˈkɑːtə/ (Bengali pronunciation: [kolkat̪a]), formerly Calcutta /kælˈkʌtə/ until 2001, is the capital of the Indian state
Indian state
of West Bengal. Located on the east bank of the Hooghly River, it is the principal commercial, cultural, and educational centre of East India, while the Port of Kolkata
Port of Kolkata
is India's oldest operating port and its sole major riverine port. The city is widely regarded as the "cultural capital" of India, and is also nicknamed the "City of Joy". In 2011, the city had a population of 4.5 million, while the population of the city and its suburbs was 14.1 million, making it the third-most populous metropolitan area in India
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Indian Museum
The Indian Museum
Museum
in Kolkata, also referred to as the Imperial Museum at Calcutta in British India era texts,[2] is the largest and oldest museum in India and has rare collections of antiques, armour and ornaments, fossils, skeletons, mummies, and Mughal paintings. It was founded by the Asiatic Society
Asiatic Society
of Bengal in Kolkata
Kolkata
(Calcutta), India, in 1814. The founder curator was Nathaniel Wallich, a Danish botanist. It has six sections comprising thirty five galleries of cultural and scientific artifacts namely Art, Archaeology, Anthropology, Geology, Zoology
Zoology
and Economic Botany. Many rare and unique specimens, both Indian and trans-Indian, relating to humanities and natural sciences, are preserved and displayed in the galleries of these sections. the administrative control of the Cultural sections, viz
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Alexander Cunningham
Sir Alexander Cunningham
Alexander Cunningham
KCIE CSI (23 January 1814 – 28 November 1893) was a British army engineer with the Bengal Engineer Group
Bengal Engineer Group
who later took an interest in the history and archaeology of India. In 1861 he was appointed to the newly created position of archaeological surveyor to the government of India; and he founded and organised what later became the Archaeological Survey of India. He wrote numerous books and monographs and made extensive collections of artefacts
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5]
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Vamana
Vamana
Vamana
(Sanskrit: वामन, IAST: Vāmana, lit. dwarf), is the fifth avatar of Hindu god Vishnu.[1][2] He incarnates in a time of crisis to restore cosmic balance by creatively defeating the Asura king Mahabali, who had acquired disproportionate power over the universe. According to Hindu mythology, the noble demon king sponsors a sacrifice and gift giving ceremony to consolidate his power, and Vishnu
Vishnu
appears at this ceremony as a dwarf mendicant called Vamana.[1] When Vamana's turn comes to receive a gift, Mahabali
Mahabali
offers him whatever riches and material wealth he would like, but Vamana
Vamana
refuses everything and states he would just like three paces of land. Mahabali finds the dwarf's request amusingly small and irrevocably grants it.[1] Vamana
Vamana
then grows into a giant of cosmic proportions
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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D. R. Bhandarkar
Devadatta Ramakrishna Bhandarkar (1875–1950) (Marathi: देवदत्त रामकृष्ण भांडारकर) was an Indian archaeologist and epigraphist who worked with the Archaeological Survey of India
Archaeological Survey of India
(ASI). He was the son of eminent Indologist, R. G. Bhandarkar. Early life[edit] Bhandarkar was born on 19 November 1875. On graduating in History, Bhandarkar joined the ASI and was posted to the western circle as an assistant to Henry Cousin.[1] As Assistant Superintendent, Bhandarkar worked in the then Rajputana, excavating the city of Nagari in Chittorgarh district
Chittorgarh district
in 1915-16.[1] He succeeded George Thibaut as the Carmichael Professor of Ancient Indian History and Culture in the University of Calcutta
University of Calcutta
and held the post from 1917 to 1936. Gandhiji met Dr
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