HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

ERα
1A52, 1ERE, 1ERR, 1G50, 1GWQ, 1GWR, 1HCP, 1HCQ, 1L2I, 1PCG, 1QKT, 1QKU, 1R5K, 1SJ0, 1UOM, 1X7E, 1X7R, 1XP1, 1XP6, 1XP9, 1XPC, 1XQC, 1YIM, 1YIN, 1ZKY, 2AYR, 2B1V, 2B1Z, 2B23, 2BJ4, 2FAI, 2G44, 2G5O, 2I0J, 2IOG, 2IOK, 2JF9, 2JFA, 2LLO, 2LLQ, 2OCF, 2OUZ, 2P15, 2POG, 2Q6J, 2Q70, 2QA6, 2QA8, 2QAB, 2QE4, 2QGT, 2QGW, 2QH6, 2QR9, 2QSE, 2QXM, 2QXS, 2QZO, 2R6W, 2R6Y, 2YAT, 2YJA, 3CBM, 3CBO, 3CBP, 3DT3, 3ERD, 3ERT, 3HLV, 3HM1, 3L03, 3OS8, 3OS9, 3OSA, 3Q95, 3Q97, 3UU7, 3UUA, 3UUC, 3UUD, 4AA6, 4DMA, 4IU7, 4IUI, 4IV2, 4IV4, 4IVW, 4IVY, 4IW6, 4IW8, 4IWC, 4IWF, 4JC3, 4JDD, 4MG5, 4MG6, 4MG7, 4MG8, 4MG9, 4MGA, 4MGB, 4MGC, 4MGD, 4O6F, 4PP6, 4PPP, 4PPS, 4PXM, 4Q13, 4Q50, 4TUZ, 4TV1, 5AK2, 5AAV, 5ACC, 5AAU, 4XI3, 4ZN9, 5FQS, 5FQR, 5FQP, 5FQT, 5FQV, 4ZN7, 5E0W, 5DUG, 4ZUC, 5DXK, 5E19, 5DXQ, 5EI1, 5DXR, 5DVS, 5DZ1, 5E0X, 5DKB, 5DWI, 5E14, 5DXB, 5BPR, 5EIT, 5E15, 4ZNS, 5EGV, 5DL4, 5DWE, 4ZNT, 5EHJ, 5DYD, 5DWG, 4ZNV, 5DWJ, 5DID, 4ZUB, 5BNU, 5DMC, 5DK9, 5DIG, 5DUH, 5DKS, 5DMF, 5DU5, 5DY8, 4ZWH, 5DVV, 5DLR, 4ZWK
[...More...]

"ERα" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Protein Data Bank
The Protein
Protein
Data Bank (PDB) is a crystallographic database for the three-dimensional structural data of large biological molecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids. The data, typically obtained by X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, or, increasingly, cryo-electron microscopy, and submitted by biologists and biochemists from around the world, are freely accessible on the Internet via the websites of its member organisations (PDBe,[1] PDBj,[2] and RCSB[3]). The PDB is overseen by an organization called the Worldwide Protein
Protein
Data Bank, wwPDB. The PDB is a key resource in areas of structural biology, such as structural genomics. Most major scientific journals, and some funding agencies, now require scientists to submit their structure data to the PDB
[...More...]

"Protein Data Bank" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Diethylstilbestrol
Diethylstilbestrol
Diethylstilbestrol
(DES), also known formerly as stilboestrol, is a synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen of the stilbestrol group which was first synthesized in 1938.[1] It is also classified as an endocrine disruptor. Human exposure to DES occurred through diverse sources, such as dietary ingestion from supplemented cattle feed and medical treatment for certain conditions, including breast and prostate cancers. From about 1940 to 1971, DES was given to pregnant women in the mistaken belief it would reduce the risk of pregnancy complications and losses. In 1971, DES was shown to cause clear cell carcinoma, a rare vaginal tumor, in girls and women who had been exposed to this drug in utero. The United States
United States
Food and Drug Administration
Food and Drug Administration
subsequently withdrew approval of DES as a treatment for pregnant women
[...More...]

"Diethylstilbestrol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Five Prime Untranslated Region
The 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR) (also known as a leader sequence or leader RNA) is the region of an mRNA that is directly upstream from the initiation codon. This region is important for the regulation of translation of a transcript by differing mechanisms in viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes. While called untranslated, the 5′ UTR or a portion of it is sometimes translated into a protein product. This product can then regulate the translation of the main coding sequence of the mRNA. In many organisms, however, the 5′ UTR is completely untranslated, instead forming complex secondary structure to regulate translation. The 5′ UTR has been found to interact with proteins relating to metabolism; and proteins translate sequences within the 5′ UTR
[...More...]

"Five Prime Untranslated Region" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Endogenous
Endogenous substances and processes are those that originate from within an organism, tissue, or cell.[1] Endogenous viral elements are DNA
DNA
sequences derived from viruses that are ancestrally inserted into the genomes of germ cells. These sequences, which may be fragments of viruses or entire viral genomes (proviruses), can persist in the germline, being passed on from one generation to the next as host alleles. Endogenous processes include senescence, the menstrual cycle and the self-sustained circadian rhythms of plants and animals. In some biological systems, endogeneity pertains to the recipient of DNA
DNA
(usually in prokaryotes). However, because of homeostasis, discerning between internal and external influences is often difficult. Endogenous transcription factors are those manufactured by the cell, as distinguished from cloned transcription factors. Etymology[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
[...More...]

"Endogenous" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Estradiol
Estradiol
Estradiol
(E2), also spelled oestradiol, is an estrogen steroid hormone and the major female sex hormone. It is involved in the regulation of the estrous and menstrual female reproductive cycles. Estradiol
Estradiol
is responsible for the development of female secondary sexual characteristics such as the breasts, widening of the hips, and a feminine pattern of fat distribution in women and is important in the development and maintenance of female reproductive tissues such as the mammary glands, uterus, and vagina during puberty, adulthood, and pregnancy.[7] It also has important effects in many other tissues including bone, fat, skin, liver, and the brain. While estradiol levels in men are much lower compared to those in women, estradiol has important roles in men as well
[...More...]

"Estradiol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Estrone
Estrone
Estrone
(E1), also spelled oestrone, is a steroid, a weak estrogen, and a minor female sex hormone.[1] It is one of three major endogenous estrogens, the others being estradiol and estriol.[1] Estrone, as well as the other estrogens, are synthesized from cholesterol and secreted mainly from the gonads, though they can also be formed from adrenal androgens in adipose tissue.[3] Relative to estradiol, both estrone and estriol have far weaker activity as estrogens.[1] Previously, estrone was available as an injected estrogen for medical use, but it is now no longer marketed.[4]Contents1 Biological effects 2 Biological activity 3 Biochemistry


[...More...]

"Estrone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Estriol
Estriol
Estriol
(E3), also spelled oestriol, is a steroid, a weak estrogen, and a minor female sex hormone.[4][5] It is one of three major endogenous estrogens, the others being estradiol and estrone.[4] Levels of estriol in women who are not pregnant are almost undetectable.[6] However, during pregnancy, estriol is synthesized in very high quantities by the placenta and is the most produced estrogen in the body by far,[6][7] although circulating levels of estriol are similar to those of other estrogens due to a relatively high rate of metabolism and excretion.[7][8] Relative to estradiol, both estriol and estrone have far weaker activity as estrogens.[4
[...More...]

"Estriol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Estetrol
Estetrol
Estetrol
(E4), or oestetrol, is a weak estrogen steroid hormone which is found in detectable levels only during pregnancy.[2] It is closely related to estriol, which is also a weak estrogen that is found in high quantities only during pregnancy.[2] Along with estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), and estriol (E3), estetrol is a major estrogen in the body.Contents1 Medical uses 2 Biochemistry2.1 Biosynthesis 2.2 Distribution3 Pharmacology 4 Chemistry 5 History 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksMedical uses[edit] The data indicate that E4 may be suitable for use in several indications including hormonal contraception, menopausal hormone therapy (both hot flashes and vaginal atrophy), breast cancer, prostate cancer and osteoporosis
[...More...]

"Estetrol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Natural Product
A natural product is a chemical compound or substance produced by a living organism—that is, found in nature.[2][3] In the broadest sense, natural products include any substance produced by life.[4][5] Natural products
Natural products
can also be prepared by chemical synthesis (both semisynthesis and total synthesis) and have played a central role in the development of the field of organic chemistry by providing challenging synthetic targets
[...More...]

"Natural Product" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Conjugated Equine Estrogen
Conjugated estrogens (CEs), or conjugated equine estrogens (CEEs), sold under the brand name Premarin (a contraction of "pregnant mares' urine") among others, is an estrogen medication which is used in menopausal hormone therapy and for various other indications.[5][3][1][6] It is a mixture of the sodium salts of estrogen conjugates found in horses, such as estrone sulfate and equilin sulfate.[1][6][5] CEEs are available in the form of both natural preparations manufactured from the urine of pregnant mares and fully synthetic replications of the natural preparations.[7][8] They are formulated both alone and in combination with progestins such as medroxyprogesterone acetate.[5] CEEs are usually taken by mouth, but can also be given by application to the skin or vagina as a cream or by injection into a blood vessel or muscle.[1][2] Side effects of CEEs include breast tenderness and enlargement, headache, fluid retention, and nausea among others.[3][1] It may increase the risk of endometr
[...More...]

"Conjugated Equine Estrogen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Synthetic Compound
An organic compound is virtually any chemical compound that contains carbon, although a consensus definition remains elusive and likely arbitrary.[1] However, the traditional definition used by most chemists is limited to compounds containing a carbon-hydrogen bond. Organic compounds are rare terrestrially, but of central importance because all known life is based on organic compounds
[...More...]

"Synthetic Compound" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ethinylestradiol
Ethinylestradiol
Ethinylestradiol
(EE) is an estrogen medication which is used widely in birth control pills in combination with progestins.[10] It is also occasionally used as a component of menopausal hormone therapy for the treatment of menopausal symptoms in combination with progestins.[10] In the past, EE was widely used alone for various indications such as the treatment of gynecological disorders and prostate cancer, but this is no longer the case. It is usually taken by mouth.[10] The general side effects of EE include breast tenderness and enlargement, headache, fluid retention, and nausea among others.[10] In men, EE can additionally cause breast development, feminization in general, hypogonadism, and sexual dysfunction
[...More...]

"Ethinylestradiol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

ERβ
4J26, 1L2J, 1NDE, 1QKM, 1U3Q, 1U3R, 1U3S, 1U9E, 1X76, 1X78, 1X7B, 1X7J, 1YY4, 1YYE, 1ZAF, 2FSZ, 2GIU, 2I0G, 2JJ3, 2NV7, 2QTU, 2YJD, 2YLY, 2Z4B, 3OLL, 3OLS, 3OMO, 3OMP, 3OMQ, 4J24, 4ZI1IdentifiersAliases ESR2, ER-BETA, ESR-BETA, ESRB, ESTRB, Erb, NR3A2, estrogen receptor 2External IDs OMIM: 601663 MGI: 109392 HomoloGene: 1100 GeneCards: ESR2Gene location (Human)Chr. Chromosome 14 (human)[1]Band 14q23.2-q23.3 Start 64,084,232 bp[1]End 64,338,112 bp[1]Gene location (Mouse)Chr. Chromosome 12 (mouse)[2]Band 12 C312 33.52 cM Start 76,120,419 bp[2]End 76,177,259 bp[2]RNA expression patternMore reference expression dataGene ontologyMolecular function • transcription factor activity, sequence-specific DNA binding • RNA polymerase II transcription factor activity, ligand-activated sequence-specific DNA binding • metal ion binding • steroid hormone receptor activity • RNA polymerase
[...More...]

"ERβ" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alternative Splicing
Alternative splicing, or differential splicing, is a regulated process during gene expression that results in a single gene coding for multiple proteins. In this process, particular exons of a gene may be included within or excluded from the final, processed messenger RNA (mRNA) produced from that gene.[1] Consequently, the proteins translated from alternatively spliced mRNAs will contain differences in their amino acid sequence and, often, in their biological functions (see Figure)
[...More...]

"Alternative Splicing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Propylpyrazoletriol
Propylpyrazoletriol (PPT) is a synthetic, nonsteroidal agonist of ERα with 400-fold selectivity over ERβ[1] that is used widely in scientific research to study the function of ERα.[2][3][4] Though originally thought to be highly selective for ERα, PPT has subsequently been found to also act as an agonist of the GPER (GPR30).[5] See also[edit]ERA-45 ERA-63 GTx-758 Methylpiperidinopyrazole (MPP)References[edit]^ Eckhard Ottow; Hilmar Weinmann (8 September 2008). Nuclear Receptors as Drug Targets. John Wiley & Sons. pp. 50–. ISBN 978-3-527-62330-3.  ^ Tony M. Plant; Anthony J. Zeleznik (15 November 2014). Knobil and Neill's Physiology of Reproduction: Two-Volume Set. Academic Press. pp. 2311–. ISBN 978-0-12-397769-4.  ^ Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Receptors—Advances in Research and Application: 2012 Edition. ScholarlyEditions. 26 December 2012. pp. 220–
[...More...]

"Propylpyrazoletriol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.