HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Equant
Equant
Equant
(or punctum aequans) is a mathematical concept developed by Claudius Ptolemy
Claudius Ptolemy
in the 2nd century AD to account for the observed motion of the planets. The equant is used to explain the observed speed change in planetary orbit during different stages of the orbit. This planetary concept allowed Ptolemy
Ptolemy
to keep the theory of uniform circular motion alive by stating that the path of heavenly bodies was uniform around one point and circular around another point.Contents1 Placement 2 Equation 3 Discovery and use 4 Criticism 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksPlacement[edit] The equant point (shown in the diagram by the large • ), is placed so that it is directly opposite to Earth from the deferent's center, known as the eccentric (represented by the × )
[...More...]

"Equant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Astronomia Nova
Astronomia nova
Astronomia nova
(English: New Astronomy, full title in original Latin: Astronomia Nova ΑΙΤΙΟΛΟΓΗΤΟΣ seu physica coelestis, tradita commentariis de motibus stellae Martis ex observationibus G.V. Tychonis Brahe)[1][2] is a book, published in 1609, that contains the results of the astronomer Johannes Kepler's ten-year-long investigation of the motion of Mars. One of the most significant books in the history of astronomy, the Astronomia nova
Astronomia nova
provided strong arguments for heliocentrism and contributed valuable insight into the movement of the planets. This included the first mention of the planets' elliptical paths and the change of their movement to the movement of free floating bodies as opposed to objects on rotating spheres
[...More...]

"Astronomia Nova" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Moon
The Moon
The Moon
is an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth, being Earth's only permanent natural satellite. It is the fifth-largest natural satellite in the Solar System, and the largest among planetary satellites relative to the size of the planet that it orbits (its primary). Following Jupiter's satellite Io, the Moon
Moon
is the second-densest satellite in the Solar System
Solar System
among those whose densities are known. The Moon
The Moon
is thought to have formed about 4.51 billion years ago, not long after Earth
[...More...]

"Moon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
[...More...]

"Digital Object Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bibcode
The bibcode (also known as the refcode) is a compact identifier used by several astronomical data systems to uniquely specify literature references.Contents1 Adoption 2 Format 3 Examples 4 See also 5 ReferencesAdoption[edit] The Bibliographic Reference Code (refcode) was originally developed to be used in SIMBAD
SIMBAD
and the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database
NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database
(NED), but it became a de facto standard and is now used more widely, for example, by the NASA Astrophysics Data System
Astrophysics Data System
who coined and prefer the term "bibcode".[1][2] Format[edit] The code has a fixed length of 19 characters and has the form YYYYJJJJJVVVVMPPPPA where YYYY is the four-digit year of the reference and JJJJJ is a code indicating where the reference was published
[...More...]

"Bibcode" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

American Journal Of Physics
The American Journal of Physics
American Journal of Physics
is a monthly, peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the American Association of Physics Teachers and the American Institute of Physics. The editor is Richard H. Price of the University of Utah.[1][2][3][4][5]Contents1 Aims and scope 2 History 3 Abstracting and indexing 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksAims and scope[edit] The focus of this journal is undergraduate and graduate level physics. The intended audience is college and university physics teachers and students. Coverage includes current research in physics, instructional laboratory equipment, laboratory demonstrations, teaching methodologies, lists of resources, and book reviews. In addition, historical, philosophical and cultural aspects of physics are also covered.[3] History[edit] The former title of this journal was American Physics Teacher (vol. 1, February 1933) (ISSN 0096-0322)
[...More...]

"American Journal Of Physics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

The Copernican Revolution (book)
The Copernican Revolution is a 1957 book by the philosopher Thomas Kuhn, in which the author provides an analysis of the Copernican Revolution, documenting the pre-Ptolemaic understanding through the Ptolemaic system and its variants until the eventual acceptance of the Keplerian system.[1] Kuhn argues that the Ptolemaic system provided broader appeal than a simple astronomical system but also became intertwined in broader philosophical and theological beliefs. Kuhn argues that this broader appeal made it more difficult for other systems to be proposed.[2][3][4][5] Summation[edit] Kuhn summarized at the end of The Copernican Revolution, citing the permanent achievements of Copernicus and Newton, while comparing the incommensurability of Newtonian physics with Aristotelian concepts that preceded the then new physics
[...More...]

"The Copernican Revolution (book)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Harvard University Press
Harvard University
Harvard University
Press (HUP) is a publishing house established on January 13, 1913, as a division of Harvard University, and focused on academic publishing.[2] In 2005, it published 220 new titles. It is a member of the Association of American University Presses. After the retirement of William P. Sisler in 2017, George Andreou was appointed as Director[3]; the editor-in-chief is Susan Wallace Boehmer. The press maintains offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts, near Harvard Square, in New York City, and in London, England. The press co-owns the distributor TriLiteral LLC with MIT Press
MIT Press
and Yale University Press.[4] Notable authors published by HUP include Eudora Welty, Walter Benjamin, E. O
[...More...]

"Harvard University Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Arthur Koestler
Arthur Koestler, CBE (/ˈkɛstlər, ˈkɛslər/; German: [ˈkœstlɐ]; Hungarian: Kösztler Artúr; 5 September 1905 – 1 March 1983) was a Hungarian-British author and journalist. Koestler was born in Budapest and, apart from his early school years, was educated in Austria. In 1931 Koestler joined the Communist Party of Germany
Communist Party of Germany
until, disillusioned by Stalinism, he resigned in 1938. In 1940 he published his novel Darkness at Noon, an anti-totalitarian work that gained him international fame. Over the next 43 years, from his residence in Britain, Koestler espoused many political causes, and wrote novels, memoirs, biographies and numerous essays. In 1968 he was awarded the Sonning Prize "for [his] outstanding contribution to European culture" and in 1972 he was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE)
[...More...]

"Arthur Koestler" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Uraniborg
Uraniborg
Uraniborg
(Danish: Uranienborg, Swedish: Uraniborg) was a Danish astronomical observatory and alchemical laboratory established and operated by Tycho Brahe. It was built c. 1576 – c. 1580 on Hven, an island in the Øresund
Øresund
between Zealand and Scania, which at that time was part of Denmark. Shortly after its construction, the observatory was expanded with an underground facility, Stjerneborg, on an adjacent site. Brahe abandoned Uranienborg and Stjerneborg
Stjerneborg
in 1597 after he fell out of favor with the Danish king, and he left the country. The institution was destroyed in 1601 after Brahe's death. Hven
Hven
was later lost to Sweden. The Round Tower in Copenhagen
Copenhagen
was inaugurated in 1642 as a replacement for Uraniborg's astronomical functions
[...More...]

"Uraniborg" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tycho Brahe
Tycho Brahe
Brahe
(/ˌtaɪkoʊ ˈbrɑːhi, ˈbrɑː, ˈbrɑːə/, born Tyge Ottesen Brahe
Brahe
(Danish: [ˈtyːə ˈʌdəsn̩ ˈbʁɑː][n 1]); 14 December 1546 – 24 October 1601) was a Danish nobleman, astronomer, and writer known for his accurate and comprehensive astronomical and planetary observations. He was born in the then Danish peninsula of Scania. Well known in his lifetime as an astronomer, astrologer and alchemist, he has been described as "the first competent mind in modern astronomy to feel ardently the passion for exact empirical facts."[1] His observations were some five times more accurate than the best available observations at the time. An heir to several of Denmark's principal noble families, he received a comprehensive education. He took an interest in astronomy and in the creation of more accurate instruments of measurement
[...More...]

"Tycho Brahe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Sleepwalkers (Koestler Book)
The Sleepwalkers: A History of Man's Changing Vision of the Universe is a 1959 book by Arthur Koestler. It traces the history of Western cosmology from ancient Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
to Isaac Newton. He suggests that discoveries in science arise through a process akin to sleepwalking. Not that they arise by chance, but rather that scientists are neither fully aware of what guides their research, nor are they fully aware of the implications of what they discover.Contents1 Synopsis 2 Publication data 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksSynopsis[edit] A central theme of the book is the changing relationship between faith and reason. Koestler explores how these seemingly contradictory threads existed harmoniously in many of the greatest intellectuals of the West
[...More...]

"The Sleepwalkers (Koestler Book)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thomas Kuhn
Thomas Samuel Kuhn (/kuːn/; July 18, 1922 – June 17, 1996) was an American physicist, historian and philosopher of science whose controversial 1962 book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions
was influential in both academic and popular circles, introducing the term paradigm shift, which has since become an English-language idiom. Kuhn made several notable claims concerning the progress of scientific knowledge: that scientific fields undergo periodic "paradigm shifts" rather than solely progressing in a linear and continuous way, and that these paradigm shifts open up new approaches to understanding what scientists would never have considered valid before; and that the notion of scientific truth, at any given moment, cannot be established solely by objective criteria but is defined by a consensus of a scientific community
[...More...]

"Thomas Kuhn" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aristotelian Physics
Aristotelian physics
Aristotelian physics
is a form of natural science described in the works of the Greek philosopher Aristotle
Aristotle
(384–322 BCE). In his work Physics, Aristotle
Aristotle
intended to establish general principles of change that govern all natural bodies, both living and inanimate, celestial and terrestrial – including all motion, change with respect to place, change with respect to size or number, qualitative change of any kind; and "coming to be" (coming into existence, "generation") and "passing away" (no longer existing, "corruption"). To Aristotle, "physics" was a broad field that included subjects such as the philosophy of mind, sensory experience, memory, anatomy and biology
[...More...]

"Aristotelian Physics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.