HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ephrin
Ephrins (also known as ephrin ligands or Eph family receptor interacting proteins) are a family of proteins that serve as the ligands of the eph receptor. Eph receptors in turn compose the largest known subfamily of receptor protein-tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Since ephrin ligands (ephrins) and Eph receptors (Ephs) are both membrane-bound proteins, binding and activation of Eph/ephrin intracellular signaling pathways can only occur via direct cell-cell interaction
[...More...]

"Ephrin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pfam
Pfam
Pfam
is a database of protein families that includes their annotations and multiple sequence alignments generated using hidden Markov models.[1][2][3] The most recent version, Pfam
Pfam
31.0, was released in March 2017 and contains 16,712 families.[4]Contents1 Uses 2 Features<
[...More...]

"Pfam" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Superior Colliculus
The superior colliculus (Latin, upper hill) is a paired structure of the mammalian midbrain. In other vertebrates the homologous structure is known as the optic tectum or simply tectum. The adjective form tectal is commonly used for mammals as well as other vertebrates. The superior colliculus/optic tectum forms a major component of the midbrain. It is a layered structure, with a number of layers that varies by species. The layers can be grouped into the superficial layers (stratum opticum and above) and the deeper layers (the remaining layers). Neurons in the superficial layers receive direct input from the retina and respond almost exclusively to visual stimuli
[...More...]

"Superior Colliculus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dissociation Constant
In chemistry, biochemistry, and pharmacology, a dissociation constant ( K d displaystyle K_ d ) is a specific type of equilibrium constant that measures the propensity of a larger object to separate (dissociate) reversibly into smaller components, as when a complex falls apart into its component molecules, or when a salt splits up into its component ions. The dissociation constant is the inverse of the association constant
[...More...]

"Dissociation Constant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

InterPro
InterPro is a database of protein families, domains and functional sites in which identifiable features found in known proteins can be applied to new protein sequences[2] in order to functionally characterise them.[3][4] The contents of InterPro consist of diagnostic signatures and the proteins that they significantly match. The signatures consist of models (simple types, such as regular expressions or more complex ones, such as Hidden Markov models) which describe protein families, domains or sites. Models are built from the amino acid sequences of known families or domains and they are subsequently used to search unknown sequences (such as those arising from novel genome sequencing) in order to classify them
[...More...]

"InterPro" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Conformational Change
In biochemistry, a conformational change is a change in the shape of a macromolecule, often induced by environmental factors. A macromolecule is usually flexible and dynamic. It can change its shape in response to changes in its environment or other factors; each possible shape is called a conformation, and a transition between them is called a conformational change. Factors that may induce such changes include:temperature, pH, voltage, ion concentration, phosphorylation, or the binding of a ligand.Laboratory analysis[edit] Many biophysical techniques such as crystallography, NMR, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) using spin label techniques, circular dichroism (CD), hydrogen exchange, and FRET can be used to study macromolecular conformational change
[...More...]

"Conformational Change" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Central Nervous System
The central nervous system (CNS) is the part of the nervous system consisting of the brain and spinal cord. The central nervous system is so named because it integrates information it receives from, and coordinates and influences the activity of, all parts of the bodies of bilaterally symmetric animals—that is, all multicellular animals except sponges and radially symmetric animals such as jellyfish—and it contains the majority of the nervous system. Many consider the retina[2] and the optic nerve (cranial nerve II),[3][4] as well as the olfactory nerves (cranial nerve I) and olfactory epithelium[5] as parts of the CNS, synapsing directly on brain tissue without intermediate ganglia. As such, the olfactory epithelium is the only central nervous tissue in direct contact with the environment, which opens up for therapeutic treatments. [5] The CNS is contained within the dorsal body cavity, with the brain housed in the cranial cavity and the spinal cord in the spinal canal
[...More...]

"Central Nervous System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Axon
An axon (from Greek ἄξων áxōn, axis) or nerve fiber, is a long, slender projection of a nerve cell, or neuron, that typically conducts electrical impulses known as action potentials, away from the nerve cell body. The function of the axon is to transmit information to different neurons, muscles, and glands. In certain sensory neurons (pseudounipolar neurons), such as those for touch and warmth, the axons are called afferent nerve fibers and the electrical impulse travels along these from the periphery to the cell body, and from the cell body to the spinal cord along another branch of the same axon. Axon
Axon
dysfunction has caused many inherited and acquired neurological disorders which can affect both the peripheral and central neurons. Nerve
Nerve
fibers are classed into three types – group A nerve fibers, group B nerve fibers, and group C nerve fibers. Groups A and B are myelinated, and group C are unmyelinated
[...More...]

"Axon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Retinotopy
Retinotopy
Retinotopy
(from Greek τόπος, place) is the mapping of visual input from the retina to neurons, particularly those neurons within the visual stream. For clarity, 'retinotopy' can be replaced with 'retinal mapping', and 'retinotopic' with 'retinally mapped'. Visual field
Visual field
maps (retinotopic maps) are found in many mammalian brains, though the specific size, number, and spatial arrangement of these maps can differ considerably between species. Retinotopic maps in cortical areas other than V1 are typically more complex, in the sense that adjacent points of the visual field are not always represented in adjacent regions of the same area
[...More...]

"Retinotopy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Posterior (anatomy)
Standard anatomical terms of location deal unambiguously with the anatomy of animals, including humans. All vertebrates (including humans) have the same basic body plan – they are strictly bilaterally symmetrical in early embryonic stages and largely bilaterally symmetrical in adulthood.[1] That is, they have mirror-image left and right halves if divided down the centre.[2] For these reasons, the basic directional terms can be considered to be those used in vertebrates. By extension, the same terms are used for many other (invertebrate) organisms as well. While these terms are standardized within specific fields of biology, there are unavoidable, sometimes dramatic, differences between some disciplines
[...More...]

"Posterior (anatomy)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stem Cell
Stem cells are biological cells that can differentiate into other types of stem cells and can divide to produce more of the same type of stem cells. They are found in multicellular organisms. In mammals, there are two broad types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells, which are isolated from the inner cell mass of blastocysts, and adult stem cells, which are found in various tissues. In adult organisms, stem cells and progenitor cells act as a repair system for the body, replenishing adult tissues
[...More...]

"Stem Cell" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anterior
Standard anatomical terms of location deal unambiguously with the anatomy of animals, including humans. All vertebrates (including humans) have the same basic body plan – they are strictly bilaterally symmetrical in early embryonic stages and largely bilaterally symmetrical in adulthood.[1] That is, they have mirror-image left and right halves if divided down the centre.[2] For these reasons, the basic directional terms can be considered to be those used in vertebrates. By extension, the same terms are used for many other (invertebrate) organisms as well. While these terms are standardized within specific fields of biology, there are unavoidable, sometimes dramatic, differences between some disciplines
[...More...]

"Anterior" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dorsal (anatomy)
Standard anatomical terms of location deal unambiguously with the anatomy of animals, including humans. All vertebrates (including humans) have the same basic body plan – they are strictly bilaterally symmetrical in early embryonic stages and largely bilaterally symmetrical in adulthood.[1] That is, they have mirror-image left and right halves if divided down the centre.[2] For these reasons, the basic directional terms can be considered to be those used in vertebrates. By extension, the same terms are used for many other (invertebrate) organisms as well. While these terms are standardized within specific fields of biology, there are unavoidable, sometimes dramatic, differences between some disciplines
[...More...]

"Dorsal (anatomy)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ventral
Standard anatomical terms of location deal unambiguously with the anatomy of animals, including humans. All vertebrates (including humans) have the same basic body plan – they are strictly bilaterally symmetrical in early embryonic stages and largely bilaterally symmetrical in adulthood.[1] That is, they have mirror-image left and right halves if divided down the centre.[2] For these reasons, the basic directional terms can be considered to be those used in vertebrates. By extension, the same terms are used for many other (invertebrate) organisms as well. While these terms are standardized within specific fields of biology, there are unavoidable, sometimes dramatic, differences between some disciplines
[...More...]

"Ventral" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation
A cerebral arteriovenous malformation (cerebral AVM, CAVM, cAVM) is an abnormal connection between the arteries and veins in the brain—specifically, an arteriovenous malformation in the cerebrum.Contents1 Signs and symptoms 2 Pathophysiology 3 Diagnosis 4 Grading4.1 Spetzler-Martin (SM) Grade 4.2 Supplemented Spetzler-Martin (SM-supp, Lawton-Young) Grade5 Treatment 6 Prognosis 7 Epidemiology 8 Research directions 9 References 10 External linksSigns and symptoms[edit] The most frequently observed problems, related to an AVM, are headaches and seizures, backaches, neckaches and eventual nausea, as the coagulated blood makes its way down to be dissolved in the individual's spinal fluid
[...More...]

"Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Melanoma
Melanoma, also known as malignant melanoma, is a type of cancer that develops from the pigment-containing cells known as melanocytes.[1] Melanomas typically occur in the skin, but may rarely occur in the mouth, intestines, or eye.[1][2] In women, they most commonly occur on the legs, while in men they are most common on the back.[2] Sometimes they develop from a mole with concerning changes including an increase in size, irregular edges, change in color, itchiness, or skin breakdown.[1] The primary cause of melanoma is ultraviolet light (UV) exposure in those with low levels of skin pigment.[2][7] The UV light may be from either the sun or from other sources, such as tanning devices.[2] About 25% develop from moles.[2] Those with many moles, a history of affected family members, and who have poor immune function are at greater risk.[1] A number of rare genetic defects such as xeroderma pigmentosum also increase risk.[8] Diagnosis is by biopsy of any concerning skin lesion.[1] Using sun
[...More...]

"Melanoma" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.