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Eorpwald
Eorpwald; also Erpenwald or Earpwald, (reigned from c. 624, assassinated c. 627 or 632), succeeded his father Rædwald as ruler of the independent Kingdom of the East Angles. Eorpwald was a member of the East Anglian dynasty known as the Wuffingas, named after the semi-historical king Wuffa. Little is known of Eorpwald's life or of his short reign, as little documentary evidence about the East Anglian kingdom has survived. The primary source for Eorpwald is the Ecclesiastical History of the English People, written by Bede
Bede
in the 8th century. Soon after becoming king, Eorpwald received Christian
Christian
teaching and was baptised in 627 or 632. Soon after his conversion he was killed by Ricberht, a pagan noble, who may have succeeded him and ruled for three years. The motive for Eorpwald's assassination was probably political as well as religious
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John Speed
John Speed
John Speed
(1551 or 1552 – 28 July 1629) was an English cartographer and historian.[1][2][3] He is the best known English mapmaker of the Stuart period.[4][5][6][7]Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Legacy 4 Maps 5 Town inserts 6 Publications 7 References 8 External linksLife[edit] Speed was born at Farndon, Cheshire
Farndon, Cheshire
and went into the tailoring business of his father, Samuel, later in life.[8][9][10][11][12] While working in London, Speed was a tailor and member of a corresponding guild, and came to the attention of "learned" individuals.[13] These individuals included Sir Fulke Greville, who subsequently made him an allowance to enable him to devote his whole attention to research. By 1598 he had enough patronage to leave his manual labor job and "engage in full-time scholarship."[13] As a reward for his earlier efforts, Queen Elizabeth granted Speed the use of a room in the Custom House
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William Of Malmesbury
William of Malmesbury
Malmesbury
(Latin: Willelmus Malmesbiriensis; c. 1095 – c. 1143) was the foremost English historian of the 12th century. He has been ranked among the most talented English historians since Bede. Modern historian C. Warren Hollister described him as "a gifted historical scholar and an omnivorous reader, impressively well versed in the literature of classical, patristic and earlier medieval times as well as in the writings of his own contemporaries. Indeed William may well have been the most learned man in twelfth-century Western Europe."[1] William was born about 1095 or 1096[2] in Wiltshire
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Ecclesiastical History Of The English People
The Ecclesiastical History of the English People
Ecclesiastical History of the English People
(Latin: Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum), written by the Venerable Bede
Venerable Bede
in about AD 731, is a history of the Christian Churches in England, and of England
England
generally; its main focus is on the conflict between the pre-Schism Roman Rite
Roman Rite
and Celtic Christianity. It was originally composed in Latin, and is considered one of the most important original references on Anglo-Saxon history and has played a key role in the development of an English national identity
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Æthelfrith Of Northumbria
The Kingdom of Northumbria (/nɔːrˈθʌmbriə/; Old English: Norþanhymbra rīce[1]) was a medieval Anglian kingdom in what is now northern England and south-east Scotland. The name derives from the Old English Norþan-hymbre meaning "the people or province north of the Humber,"[2] which reflects the approximate southern limit to the kingdom's territory, the Humber Estuary. Northumbria started to consolidate into one kingdom in the early seventh century. At its height, the kingdom extended from just south of the Humber to the River Mersey and to the Firth of Forth, in Scotland. Northumbria ceased to be an independent kingdom in the mid-tenth century. Northumbria is also used in the names of some North East regional institutions, particularly the police force (Northumbria Police, which covers Northumberland and Tyne and Wear), a university (Northumbria University) based in Newcastle upon Tyne and Northumbria Army Cadet Force, as well as the regionalist Northumbrian Association[3]
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Deira (kingdom)
Deira
Deira
(Old English: Derenrice or Dere) was a Celtic kingdom – first recorded (but much older) by the Anglo-Saxons in 559 AD and lasted til 664 AD,[1] in Northern England
Northern England
that was first recorded when Anglian warriors invaded the Derwent Valley in the third quarter of the fifth century.[2] It extended from the Humber
Humber
to the Tees, and from the sea to the western edge of the Vale of York
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York
York
York
(/ˈjɔːrk/ ( listen)) is a historic walled city at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss in North Yorkshire, England. The municipality is the traditional county town of the historic county of Yorkshire
Yorkshire
to which it gives its name. The city has a rich heritage and has provided the backdrop to major political events in England throughout much of its two millennia of existence. The city offers a wealth of historic attractions, of which York Minster is the most prominent, and a variety of cultural and sporting activities making it a popular tourist destination. The city was founded by the Romans as Eboracum
Eboracum
in 71 AD. It became the capital of the Roman province
Roman province
of Britannia Inferior, and later of the kingdoms of Northumbria
Northumbria
and Jórvík
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Bernicia
Bernicia
Bernicia
(Old English: Bernice, Bryneich, Beornice; Latin: Bernicia) was an Anglo-Saxon kingdom established by Anglian settlers of the 6th century in what is now southeastern Scotland
Scotland
and North East England. The Anglian territory of Bernicia
Bernicia
was approximately equivalent to the modern English counties of Northumberland
Northumberland
and Durham, and the Scottish counties of Berwickshire
Berwickshire
and East Lothian, stretching from the Forth to the Tees
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Northumbria
The Kingdom of Northumbria (/nɔːrˈθʌmbriə/; Old English: Norþanhymbra rīce[1]) was a medieval Anglian kingdom in what is now northern England and south-east Scotland. The name derives from the Old English Norþan-hymbre meaning "the people or province north of the Humber,"[2] which reflects the approximate southern limit to the kingdom's territory, the Humber Estuary. Northumbria started to consolidate into one kingdom in the early seventh century. At its height, the kingdom extended from just south of the Humber to the River Mersey and to the Firth of Forth, in Scotland. Northumbria ceased to be an independent kingdom in the mid-tenth century. Northumbria is also used in the names of some North East regional institutions, particularly the police force (Northumbria Police, which covers Northumberland and Tyne and Wear), a university (Northumbria University) based in Newcastle upon Tyne and Northumbria Army Cadet Force, as well as the regionalist Northumbrian Association[3]
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Bretwalda
Bretwalda
Bretwalda
(also brytenwalda and bretenanwealda, sometimes capitalised) is an Old English
Old English
word. The first record comes from the late 9th-century Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. It is given to some of the rulers of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms from the 5th century onwards who had achieved overlordship of some or all of the other Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. It is unclear whether the word dates back to the 5th century and was used by the kings themselves or whether it is a later, 9th-century, invention. The term bretwalda also appears in a 10th-century charter of Æthelstan. The literal meaning of the word is disputed and may translate to either 'wide-ruler' or 'Britain-ruler'. The rulers of Mercia
Mercia
were generally the most powerful of the Anglo-Saxon kings from the mid 7th century to the early 9th century but are not accorded the title of bretwalda by the Chronicle, which had an anti-Mercian bias
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Ship Burial
A ship burial or boat grave is a burial in which a ship or boat is used either as a container for the dead and the grave goods, or as a part of the grave goods itself. If the ship is very small, it is called a boat grave. This style of burial was used among the Germanic peoples, particularly by Viking Age
Viking Age
Norsemen
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Barbara Yorke
Barbara Yorke FRHistS (born 1951) is a historian of Anglo-Saxon England. Yorke studied history and archaeology at Exeter University, where she completed both her undergraduate degree and her Ph.D. She is currently Emeritus Professor of Early Medieval History
History
at the University of Winchester, and is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. She is an Honorary Professor of the Institute of Archaeology at University College London, and presented "King Alfred and the traditions of Anglo-Saxon kingship" at the 2011 Toller Lecture.[1] Yorke's publications include:Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England. London, Seaby, 1990. ISBN 1-85264-027-8 Wessex in the Early Middle Ages. Continuum International, 1995. ISBN 978-0-7185-1856-1 Bishop Aethelwold: His Career and Influence. The Boydell Press, 1997. ISBN 978-0-85115-705-4 The Anglo-Saxons. Sutton, 1999. ISBN 978-0-7509-2220-3 Nunneries and the Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses
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Anglo-Saxon
The Anglo- Saxons
Saxons
were a people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the 5th century. They comprise people from Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
culture and language. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest.[1] The early Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language
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Gaul
Gaul
Gaul
(Latin: Gallia) was a region of Western Europe
Western Europe
during the Iron Age that was inhabited by Celtic tribes, encompassing present day France, Luxembourg, Belgium, most of Switzerland, Northern Italy, as well as the parts of the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Germany
Germany
on the west bank of the Rhine. It covered an area of 494,000 km2 (191,000 sq mi).[1] According to the testimony of Julius Caesar, Gaul
Gaul
was divided into three parts: Gallia Celtica, Belgica and Aquitania
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Kingdom Of Lindsey
The Kingdom of Lindsey
Kingdom of Lindsey
or Linnuis (Old English: Lindesege) was a lesser Anglo-Saxon kingdom, which was absorbed into Northumbria
Northumbria
in the 7th century.Contents1 Geography 2 History2.1 Kings of Lindsey3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksGeography[edit] Lindsey lay between the Humber
Humber
estuary and the Wash, forming its inland boundaries from the courses of the Witham and Trent rivers, and the Foss Dyke
Foss Dyke
between them. A marshy region south of the Humber
Humber
known as the Isle of Axholme was also included
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Episcopal See
An episcopal see is, in the usual meaning of the phrase, the area of a bishop's ecclesiastical jurisdiction.[1][2] Phrases concerning actions occurring within or outside an episcopal see are indicative of the geographical significance of the term, making it synonymous with "diocese".[3][4][5][6] The word "see" is derived from Latin
Latin
sedes, which in its original or proper sense denotes the seat or chair that, in the case of a bishop, is the earliest symbol of the bishop's authority.[7] This symbolic chair is also known as the bishop's cathedra, and is placed in the diocese principal church, which for that reason is called the bishop's cathedral, from Latin
Latin
ecclesia cathedralis, meaning the church of the cathedra
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