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Eochaid Mugmedón
Eochaid Mugmedón (pronounced [ˈɛxəð ˈmʊɣvʲəðən]) was a legendary Irish king. According to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, Eochaid was a High King of Ireland, best known as the father of Niall of the Nine Hostages and ancestor of the Uí Néill and Connachta
Connachta
dynasties. He is not mentioned in the list of kings of Tara in the Baile Chuind (The Ecstasy of Conn), but is included in the synthetic lists of High Kings in the Lebor Gabála Érenn, the Irish annals, Geoffrey Keating's history, and the Laud Synchronisms. According to the Lebor Gabála Érenn[1] and its derivative works, Eochaid was the son of the former High King Muiredach Tírech, a descendant of Conn Cétchathach. Muiredach was overthrown and killed by Cáelbad son of Cronn Bradruí, an Ulster king, but Cálbad only ruled one year before Eochaid killed him and took the throne
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High King Of Ireland
The High Kings of Ireland
Ireland
(Irish: Ard- na hÉireann Irish pronunciation: [ˈa:ɾˠd̪ˠˌɾˠiː n̪ˠə ˈheːrʲən̪ˠ]) were sometimes historical and sometimes legendary figures who had, or who are claimed to have had, lordship over the whole of Ireland. Medieval and early modern Irish literature portrays an almost unbroken sequence of High Kings, ruling from the Hill of Tara
Hill of Tara
over a hierarchy of lesser kings, stretching back thousands of years
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Conall Gulban
Conall Gulban (died c. 464) was an Irish king and eponymous ancestor of the Cenél Conaill, who founded the kingdom of Tír Chonaill
Tír Chonaill
in the 5th century, comprising much of what is now County Donegal
County Donegal
in Ulster. He was the son of Niall Noígiallach.[1] His by-name Gulban derives from Benn Ghulbain in County Sligo, from which centre the sons of Niall set out upon their conquest of the North.[2] King Conall Gulban was murdered by the Masraige at Magh Slécht (located in the west of modern County Cavan) in 464, on a Friday.[3] He was buried by Saint Caillin at Fenagh, County Leitrim.[4] He is important in the history of Irish Christianity as he was the first nobleman baptised by St
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Munster
Patron Saint: Ailbe
Ailbe
of Emly[3] a. ^ Munster
Munster
is part of the South constituency; the six Munster counties contain 74.1% of the population of this constituency.[4] Munster
Munster
(Irish: an Mhumhain / Cúige Mumhan, pronounced [ə ˈvuːnʲ], [ˌkuːgʲə ˈmuːn]) is one of the provinces of Ireland situated in the south of Ireland. In early Ireland, the Kingdom of Munster
Munster
was one of the kingdoms of Gaelic Ireland
Gaelic Ireland
ruled by a "king of over-kings" Irish: rí ruirech. Following the Norman invasion of Ireland, the ancient kingdoms were shired into counties for administrative and judicial purposes. In later centuries, local government legislation has seen further sub-division of the historic counties. Munster
Munster
has no official function for local government purposes
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Annals Of The Four Masters
The Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland (Irish: Annála Ríoghachta Éireann) or the Annals of the Four Masters
Annals of the Four Masters
(Annála na gCeithre Máistrí) are chronicles of medieval Irish history. The entries span from the Deluge, dated as 2,242 years after creation[1] to AD 1616.[2]Contents1 Publication delay 2 Text 3 Translation 4 Importance 5 Editions and translations 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksPublication delay[edit] Due to the criticisms by Irish historian Tuileagna Ó Maol Chonaire, the text was not published in the lifetime of any of the participants. Text[edit] The annals are mainly a compilation of earlier annals, although there is some original work. They were compiled between 1632 and 1636 at a Franciscan
Franciscan
friary near the Drowes river, now in County Leitrim, and on the border with County Donegal
County Donegal
and County Sligo
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List Of High Kings Of Ireland
Medieval Irish historical tradition held that Ireland
Ireland
had been ruled by an Ard or High King since ancient times, and compilations like the 11th-century Lebor Gabála Érenn, followed by early modern works like the Annals of the Four Masters
Annals of the Four Masters
and Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éirinn, purported to trace the line of High Kings. The corpus of early Irish law does not support the existence of such an institution, and scholars now believe it is a pseudohistorical construct of the eighth century AD, a projection into the distant past of a political entity which did not become a reality until the Normans. Rulers like Máel Sechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid declared themselves as King of All Ireland
Ireland
but such claims did not gain the political support of other kingdoms (i.e
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Art Mac Cuinn
Art mac Cuinn ("son of Conn"), also known as Art Óenfer (literally "one man", used in the sense of "lone", "solitary", or "only son"),[1] was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland. According to legend, he was not Conn's only son: he had a brother called Connla, who fell in love with a fairy woman, and went with her to Mag Mell, never to be seen again
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Cormac Mac Airt
Cormac mac Airt (son of Art), also known as Cormac ua Cuinn (grandson of Conn) or Cormac Ulfada (long beard), was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland. He is probably the most famous of the ancient High Kings, and may have been an authentic historical figure, although many legends have attached themselves to him, and his reign is variously dated as early as the 2nd century and as late as the 4th. He is said to have ruled from Tara, the seat of the High Kings of Ireland, for forty years, and under his rule Tara flourished. He was famous for his wise, true, and generous judgments
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Cairbre Lifechair
Cairbre Lifechair ("lover of the Liffey"), son of Cormac mac Airt, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland. He came to the throne after the death of Eochaid Gonnat. During his time Bresal Belach was king of Leinster, and refused to pay the bórama or cow-tribute to the High King, but Cairbre defeated him in the Battle of Dubchomar, and from then on exacted the bórama without a battle. Reign[edit] According to the 8th-century text known as The Expulsion of the Déisi, Cairbre takes the throne when his father Cormac is blinded by Óengus Gaíbúaibthech of the Déisi, it being against the law for the king to have any physical blemish
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Eógan Mac Néill
Eógan mac Néill
Eógan mac Néill
(modern orthography: Eoghan mac Néill) (reportedly died 465[1]) was a son of Niall Noígiallach and the eponymous ancestor of the Cenél nEógain branch of the Northern Uí Néill,[a] who founded the over-kingdom of Ailech
Ailech
and later Tír Eoghain. His territory occupied the counties of Tyrone, Armagh, Down, Antrim, Londonderry and north west Donegal and Argyll in Scotland
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Samhain
Samhain
Samhain
(/ˈsɑːwɪn, ˈsaʊɪn/; Irish: [sˠəuɪnʲ]) is a Gaelic festival marking the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter or the "darker half" of the year. Traditionally, it is celebrated from 31 October to 1 November, as the Celtic day began and ended at sunset. This is about halfway between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice. It is one of the four Gaelic seasonal festivals, along with Imbolc, Bealtaine
Bealtaine
and Lughnasadh. Historically, it was widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man
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Coirpre Mac Néill
Coirpre mac Néill
Coirpre mac Néill
(fl. c. 485–493), also Cairbre or Cairpre, was said to be a son of Niall of the Nine Hostages. Coirpre was perhaps the leader of the conquests that established the southern Uí Néill in the midlands of Ireland. The record of the Irish annals suggests that Coirpre's successes were reattributed to Muirchertach Macc Ercae. Coirpre is portrayed as an enemy of Saint Patrick
Saint Patrick
in Bishop Tirechán's hagiography and his descendants are said to have been cursed by Patrick so that none would be High King of Ireland. Coirpre is excluded from most lists of High Kings, but included in the earliest. In later times Coirpre's descendants, the Cenél Coirpri, ruled over three small kingdoms— Cairbre Drom Cliabh
Cairbre Drom Cliabh
in north Co
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Lóegaire Mac Néill
Lóegaire (floruit fifth century) (reigned 428–458 AD, according to the Annals of the Four Masters
Annals of the Four Masters
of the Kingdom of Ireland)(died c. 462), also Lóeguire, is said to have been a son of Niall of the Nine Hostages. The Irish annals and king lists include him as a King of Tara or High King of Ireland. He appears as an adversary of Saint Patrick in several hagiographies. His dealings with the saint were believed to account for his descendants' lack of importance in later times. There are several accounts of his death, all of which contain supernatural elements, some of which concern his wars against Leinster. Contents1 Sons of Niall 2 Saint Patrick 3 Bóroma Laigen 4 Death 5 Cenél Lóegairi 6 Notes 7 ReferencesSons of Niall[edit] The Irish annals purport to record events in the fifth century, but their reliability is doubtful as such early entries were added in the ninth century or later
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Maine Of Tethba
Máiné of Tethbae
Tethbae
or Máiné mac Néill was a supposed son of Niall Noigiallach. Writing of him in 1973, Irish historian Francis John Byrne stated his belief that:We may suspect then that eastern Uí Máiné was so successfully absorbed into the Uí Néill ambit that their kings, by a polite fiction, were accepted into the dominant dynasty circle ... The fact that the annalistic obit of Máiné mac Néill in 440 is so much earlier than that of any of his supposed brothers also suggests that he was adopted into the dynasty some time after the synthetic historians had agreed to push back the date of Niall's reign by a generation or more
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Lughaid Mac Loeguire
Lugaid mac Lóegairi (died c. 507) was a High King of Ireland. He was a grandson of Niall of the Nine Hostages. One of the supposed twelve sons of Lóegaire mac Néill, his mother was Angias, a daughter of (Ailill) Tassach of the Uí Liatháin.[1] Compared to his father, who features prominently in hagiographies of Saint Patrick, Lugaid is a lesser figure. Before he was born Patrick is said by the late Vita tripartita Sancti Patricii to have cursed Lóegaire's descendants so that they would never enjoy the kingship. His mother, who is said to have been pregnant with Lugaid at the time, beseeched Patrick to lift the curse from her unborn son
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