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Environmental Sociology
Environmental sociology
Environmental sociology
is the study of interactions between societies and their natural environments
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Science And Technology Studies
Science, technology and society studies, or science and technology studies (both abbreviated STS) is the study of how society, politics, and culture affect scientific research and technological innovation, and how these, in turn, affect society, politics and culture.Contents1 History1.1 Key themes 1.2 The "turn to technology" (and beyond)2 Professional associations 3 Journals 4 Important concepts4.1 STS social construction 4.2 Technoscience 4.3 Technosocial4.3.1 Examples4.4 Deliberative democracy4.4.1 Importance of deliberative democracy in STS 4.4.2 Deliberative democracy in practice4.5 Tragedy of the commons 4.6 Alte
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Social Research
Social research
Social research
is a research conducted by social scientists following a systematic plan. Social research
Social research
methodologies can be classified as quantitative or qualitative.[1]Quantitative designs approach social phenomena through quantifiable evidence, and often rely on statistical analysis of many cases (or across intentionally designed treatments in an experiment) to create valid and reliable general claims. Related to quantity. Qualitative designs emphasize understanding of social phenomena through direct observation, communication with participants, or analysis of texts, and may stress contextual subjective accuracy over generality. Related to quality.While methods may be classified as quantitative or qualitative, most methods contain elements of both
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Sociology Of The Family
Sociological studies of the family look at:demographic characteristics of the family members: family size, age, ethnicity, and gender of the members social class of the family, the economic level and mobility of the family, the professions of its members, the education levels of the family members what spheres of life are important in and to the family unit the effect of social change on the family the interactions of the family with other social organizations. diversity of family forms in contemporary societies in relation to ideology, gender differences, and state policies such as those concerned with marriage interaction between family members within the family. How they rely on one another. How they work together/rely on the work of someone in the family.Examples of specific issues looked at include:Changing roles of family members. Each member is restricted by the sex roles of the traditional family
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Sociology Of Health And Illness
The sociology of health and illness, alternatively the sociology of health and wellness (or simply health sociology), examines the interaction between society and health. The objective of this topic is to see how social life affects morbidity and mortality rate, and vice versa.[1] This aspect of sociology differs from medical sociology in that this branch of sociology discusses health and illness in relation to social institutions such as family, employment, and school. The sociology of medicine limits its concern to the patient-practitioner relationship and the role of health professionals in society.[2] The sociology of health and illness covers sociological pathology (causes of disease and illness), reasons for seeking particular types of medical aid, and patient compliance or noncompliance with medical regimes.[2] Health, or lack of health, was once merely attributed to biological or natural conditions
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Comparative Historical Research
Comparative historical research is a method of social science that examines historical events in order to create explanations that are valid beyond a particular time and place, either by direct comparison to other historical events, theory building, or reference to the present day.[1] Generally, it involves comparisons of social processes across times and places. It overlaps with historical sociology. While the disciplines of history and sociology have always been connected, they have connected in different ways at different times (see 'Major researchers' below). This form of research may use any of several theoretical orientations
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Quantitative Research
In [Marketing] Quantitative research is aimed at producing data that can be analysed using statistics and the results expressed numerically. From marketing research perspective it is used to gather data from existing and potential customers
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Organizational Theory
Organizational theory consists of approaches to organizational analysis. Organizations are defined as social units of people that are structured and managed to meet a need, or to pursue collective goals. Theories of organizations include rational system perspective, division of labor, bureaucratic theory, and contingency theory. In a rational organization system, there are two significant parts: Specificity of Goals and Formalization. The division of labor is the specialization of individual labor roles, associated with increasing output and trade. Modernization theorist Frank Dobbin states "modern institutions are transparently purposive and that we are in the midst an evolutionary progression towards more efficient forms". Max Weber's conception of bureaucracy is characterized by the presence of impersonal positions that are earned and not inherited, rule-governed decision-making, professionalism, chain of command, defined responsibility, and bounded authority
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Sociology Of Religion
Sociology
Sociology
of religion is the study of the beliefs, practices and organizational forms of religion using the tools and methods of the discipline of sociology. This objective investigation may include the use of both quantitative methods (surveys, polls, demographic and census analysis) and qualitative approaches such as participant observation, interviewing, and analysis of archival, historical and documentary materials.[1] Modern academic sociology began with the analysis of religion in Émile Durkheim's 1897 study of suicide rates among Catholic and Protestant populations, a foundational work of social research which served to distinguish sociology from other disciplines, such as psychology. The works of Karl Marx
Karl Marx
and Max Weber
Max Weber
emphasized the relationship between religion and the economic or social structure of society
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Sociology Of Knowledge
The sociology of knowledge is the study of the relationship between human thought and the social context within which it arises, and of the effects prevailing ideas have on societies. It is not a specialized area of sociology but instead deals with broad fundamental questions about the extent and limits of social influences on individuals' lives and the social-cultural basics of our knowledge about the world.[1] Complementary to the sociology of knowledge is the sociology of ignorance,[2] including the study of nescience, ignorance, knowledge gaps, or non-knowledge as inherent features of knowledge making.[3][4][5] The sociology of knowledge was pioneered primarily by the sociologist Émile Durkheim
Émile Durkheim
at beginning of the 20th century. His work deals directly with how conceptual thought, language, and logic could be influenced by the sociological milieu out of which they arise
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Social Stratification
Social stratification
Social stratification
is a kind of social differentiation whereby a society groups people into socioeconomic strata, based upon their occupation and income, wealth and social status, or derived power (social and political). As such, stratification is the relative social position of persons within a social group, category, geographic region, or social unit. In modern Western societies, social stratification typically is distinguished as three social classes: (i) the upper class, (ii) the middle class, and (iii) the lower class; in turn, each class can be subdivided into strata, e.g
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Feminist Sociology
Feminist
Feminist
sociology is a conflict theory and theoretical perspective which observes gender in its relation to power, both at the level of face-to-face interaction and reflexivity within a social structure at large. Focuses include sexual orientation, race, economic status, and nationality. At the core of feminist sociology is the idea of the systematic oppression[note 1] of women and the historical dominance of men within most societies: 'patriarchy'. Feminist
Feminist
thought has a rich history, however, which may be categorized into three 'waves'. The current, 'third wave', emphasizes the concepts of globalization, postcolonialism, post-structuralism and postmodernism
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Sociology Of Gender
Sociology
Sociology
of gender is a prominent subfield of sociology. Social interaction directly correlated with sociology regarding social structure. One of the most important social structures is status. This is determined based on position that an individual possesses which effects how he/she will be treated by society. One of the most important statuses an individual claims is gender.[1] Public discourse and the academic literature generally use the term gender for the perceived or projected (self-identified) masculinity or femininity of a person.[citation needed]Contents1 Introduction 2 In feminist theory 3 Other languages 4 U.S
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Social Psychology (sociology)
In sociology, social psychology, also known as sociological social psychology or microsociology, is an area of sociology that focuses on social actions and on interrelations of personality, values, and mind with social structure and culture. Some of the major topics in this field are social status,structural power, sociocultural change, social inequality and prejudice, leadership and intra-group behavior, social exchange, group conflict, impression formation and management, conversation structures, socialization, social constructionism, social norms and deviance, identity and roles, and emotional labor
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Industrial Sociology
Industrial sociology, until recently a crucial research area within the field of sociology of work, examines "the direction and implications of trends in technological change, globalization, labour markets, work organization, managerial practices and employment relations to the extent to which these trends are intimately related to changing patterns of inequality in modern societies and to the changing experiences of individuals and families the ways in which workers challenge, resist and make their own contributions to the patterning of work and shaping of work institutions."[1] Labor process theory[edit] One branch of industrial sociology is Labor process theory (LPT). In 1974, Harry Braverman wrote Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century, which provided a critical analysis of scientific management
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Social Inequality
Social inequality
Social inequality
occurs when resources in a given society are distributed unevenly, typically through norms of allocation, that engender specific patterns along lines of socially defined categories of persons. It is the differentiation preference of access of social goods in the society brought about by power, religion, kinship, prestige, race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, and class. The social rights include labor market, the source of income, health care, and freedom of speech, education, political representation, and participation.[1] Social inequality
Social inequality
linked to Economic inequality, usually described on the basis of the unequal distribution of income or wealth, is a frequently studied type of social inequality
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