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Ennobled
Nobility
Nobility
is a social class in aristocracy, normally ranked immediately under royalty, that possesses more acknowledged privileges and higher social status than most other classes in a society and with membership thereof typically being hereditary. The privileges associated with nobility may constitute substantial advantages over or relative to non-nobles, or may be largely honorary (e.g., precedence), and vary by country and era
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Nobles (other)
Nobles
Nobles
are members of a nobility. Nobles
Nobles
may also refer to:Noble and Greenough School, a preparatory school in Dedham, Massachusetts, United States Nobles
Nobles
County, Minnesota, United States Nobles, Tennessee, an unincorporated community, United States Nobles
Nobles
a series of books written for the Forgotten Realms
Forgotten Realms
of Dungeons & DragonsPeople with the surname Nobles:Cliff Nobles
Nobles
(born 1944), American pop singer Gene Nobles
Nobles
(1913–1989), American radio disc jockey Gerald Nobles
Nobles
(born 1971), American boxer Vada Nobles
Nobles
(21st century), American record producer and songwriter William H
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Earl
An earl /ɜːrl/[1] is a member of the nobility. The title is Anglo-Saxon in origin, akin to the Scandinavian form jarl, and meant "chieftain", particularly a chieftain set to rule a territory in a king's stead. In Scandinavia, it became obsolete in the Middle Ages and was replaced by duke (hertig/hertug/hertog). In later medieval Britain, it became the equivalent of the continental count (in England in the earlier period, it was more akin to a duke; in Scotland
Scotland
it assimilated the concept of mormaer). However, earlier in Scandinavia, jarl could also mean a sovereign prince.[citation needed] For example, the rulers of several of the petty kingdoms of Norway had the title of jarl and in many cases they had no less power than their neighbours who had the title of king
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Infante
Infante
Infante
(Spanish: [imˈfante], Portuguese: [ĩˈfɐ̃t(ɨ)]; f
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Królewicz
Królewicz
Królewicz
(f. królewna; plural forms królewicze and królewny) was the title given to the sons and daughters of the king of Poland (and Grand Duke
Grand Duke
of Lithuania), later the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. It was similar in its distinctiveness to the Spanish and Portugese title of infante, also reserved to the children of the monarch. Though, it was used only to denote one's status as a King's child. Królewicz
Królewicz
and królewna has no direct equivalent in other languages and was translated to the English prince and German prinz, like dynasts of a royal house
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Duke
A duke (male) (British English: /djuːk/[1] or American English: /duːk/[2]) or duchess (female) can either be a monarch ruling over a duchy or a member of the nobility, historically of highest rank below the monarch. The title comes from French duc, itself from the Latin dux, 'leader', a term used in republican Rome to refer to a military commander without an official rank (particularly one of Germanic or Celtic origin), and later coming to mean the leading military commander of a province. The title dux survived in the Eastern Roman Empire
Eastern Roman Empire
where it was used in several contexts signifying a rank equivalent to a captain or general. Later on, in the 11th century, the title Megas Doux
Megas Doux
was introduced for the post of commander-in-chief of the entire navy. During the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
the title (as Herzog) signified first among the Germanic monarchies
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Duchess
A duke (male) (British English: /djuːk/[1] or American English: /duːk/[2]) or duchess (female) can either be a monarch ruling over a duchy or a member of the nobility, historically of highest rank below the monarch. The title comes from French duc, itself from the Latin dux, 'leader', a term used in republican Rome to refer to a military commander without an official rank (particularly one of Germanic or Celtic origin), and later coming to mean the leading military commander of a province. The title dux survived in the Eastern Roman Empire
Eastern Roman Empire
where it was used in several contexts signifying a rank equivalent to a captain or general. Later on, in the 11th century, the title Megas Doux
Megas Doux
was introduced for the post of commander-in-chief of the entire navy. During the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
the title (as Herzog) signified first among the Germanic monarchies
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Fürst
Fürst
Fürst
(German pronunciation: [ˈfʏʁst] ( listen), female form Fürstin, plural Fürsten; from Old High German
Old High German
furisto, "the first", a translation of the Latin
Latin
princeps) is a German word for a ruler and is also a princely title
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Marquess
A marquess (UK: /ˈmɑːrkwɪs/;[1] French: marquis, [mɑʁki];[2] Italian: marchese, Spanish: marqués, Portuguese: marquês) is a nobleman of hereditary rank in various European peerages and in those of some of their former colonies. The term is also used to translate equivalent Asian styles, as in imperial China and Japan. In the German lands, a Margrave
Margrave
was a ruler of an immediate Imperial territory (examples include the Margrave
Margrave
of Brandenburg, the Margrave of Baden and the Margrave
Margrave
of Bayreuth), not simply a nobleman like a marquess or marquis in Western and Southern Europe
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Margrave
Margrave
Margrave
was originally the medieval title for the military commander assigned to maintain the defense of one of the border provinces of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
or of a kingdom
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Landgrave
Landgrave
Landgrave
(Dutch: landgraaf, German: Landgraf; Swedish: lantgreve, French: landgrave; Latin: comes magnus, comes patriae, comes provinciae, comes terrae, comes principalis, lantgravius) was a noble title used in the Holy Roman Empire, and later on in its former territories. The German titles of Landgraf, Markgraf ("margrave"), and Pfalzgraf ("count palatine") are in the same class of ranks as Herzog ("duke") and above the rank of a Graf
Graf
("count").Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Examples 4 Related terms 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The English word landgrave is the equivalent of the German Landgraf, a compound of the words Land and Graf
Graf
(German: count). Description[edit] The title referred originally to a count who had imperial immediacy, or feudal duty owed directly to the Holy Roman Emperor
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Count Palatine
Count
Count
palatine is a high noble title,[1] used to render several comital (of or relating to a count or earl) styles, in some cases also shortened to Palatine, which can have other meanings as well.Contents1 Importance of a Count
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Count
Count
Count
(male) or countess (female) is a title in European countries for a noble of varying status, but historically deemed to convey an approximate rank intermediate between the highest and lowest titles of nobility.[1] The word count came into English from the French comte, itself from Latin
Latin
comes—in its accusative comitem—meaning “companion”, and later “companion of the emperor, delegate of the emperor”. The adjective form of the word is "comital". The British and Irish equivalent is an earl (whose wife is a "countess", for lack of an English term)
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Burgrave
Burgrave
Burgrave
(from German: Burggraf, Latin: burggravius, burcgravius, burgicomes) was since the medieval period a title for the ruler of a castle, especially a royal or episcopal castle, as well as a castle district (castellany) or fortified settlement or city.[1][2] The burgrave was a count in rank (German Graf, Latin Comes) equipped with judicial powers.[1][2] The title became hereditary in certain feudal families and was associated with a territory or domain called a Burgraviate (German Burggrafschaft, Latin Prefectura)
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Prince
A prince is a male ruler or member of a monarch's or former monarch's family. Prince
Prince
is also a title of nobility, often hereditary, in some European states. The feminine equivalent is a princess
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Châtelain
Châtelain
Châtelain
(Med. Lat. castellanus, from castellum, a castle) was originally merely the French equivalent of the English castellan, i.e. the commander of a castle. With the growth of the feudal system, however, the title gained in France
France
a special significance which it never acquired in England, as implying the jurisdiction of which the castle became the centre. The châtelain was originally, in Carolingian
Carolingian
times, an official of the count; with the development of feudalism the office became a fief, and so ultimately hereditary
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