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English Australian
English Australians, also known as Anglo-Australians,[5] are Australians
Australians
of English descent, and are both the single largest ethnic group in Australia
Australia
and the largest 'ancestry' identity in the Australian Census.[6] In the 2011 census, 7.2 million or 36.1% of respondents identified as "English" or a combination including English, such as English-Australian
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England And Wales
England
England
and Wales
Wales
(Welsh: Cymru a Lloegr) is a legal jurisdiction covering England
England
and Wales, two of the four countries of the United Kingdom. " England
England
and Wales" forms the constitutional successor to the former Kingdom of England
England
and follows a single legal system, known as English law. The devolved National Assembly for Wales
Wales
(Welsh: Cynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru) was created in 1999 by the Parliament of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
under the Government of Wales
Wales
Act 1998 and provides a degree of self-government in Wales. The powers of the Assembly were expanded by the Government of Wales
Wales
Act 2006, which allows it to pass its own laws, and the Act also formally separated the Welsh Government from the Assembly
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Henry Savery
Henry Savery
Henry Savery
(4 August 1791 – 6 February 1842) was a convict transported to Port Arthur, Tasmania, and Australia's first novelist. It is generally agreed that his writing is more important for its historical value than its literary merit.[1]Contents1 Early life in England 2 Transported
Transported
to Van Diemens Land 3 See also 4 Bibliography 5 External links 6 ReferencesEarly life in England[edit] Henry Savery
Henry Savery
was born in Somerset, England into the family of a well to do banker.[2] Little else is known of his early years. He married Eliza Elliott Oliver, daughter of a London business man, and their only son was born in 1816
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William Henry Groom
William Henry Groom
William Henry Groom
(9 March 1833 – 8 August 1901) was a publican, newspaper proprietor, and member of the Parliament of Queensland
Parliament of Queensland
and the Parliament of Australia.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Politics 4 Death 5 Legacy 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Groom was born at Plymouth, England, son of Thomas Groom, cordwainer, and his wife Maria, née Harkcom. Groom was educated at St Andrew's College, Plymouth
Plymouth
and apprenticed to a baker. He was transported from England
England
to Australia
Australia
as a convict in 1846 for seven years, having been convicted of embezzlement, aged just 13. He was eventually released, subsequently convicted again of a similar offence and served gaol time in the goldfields in what would later be the colony of Victoria
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William Hutchinson (superintendent)
William Hutchinson (1772 – 26 July 1846) was a British convict who was transported to the Australian colonies, ultimately to become a successful public servant and businessman. Hutchinson was by trade a butcher in England.[1] In June 1796, Hutchinson was convicted at the Old Bailey
Old Bailey
of stealing £ 40 worth of goods, and was sentenced to death, though this was later commuted to transportation for seven years.[2] After spending three years in London on board the prison hulk Newgate, Hutchinson was transported to Australia on the Hillsborough, sometimes referred to as the "Fever Ship
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Mark Jeffrey
Mark Jeffrey
Mark Jeffrey
(1825-1903) Mark Jeffery (or “Big Mark”) was an English convict who departed England on the 12th of December 1849 and arrived in Australia on the 30th of April 1850. Mark Jeffery was described as “A terror to those in authority. He always fought against injustice…”. Mark’s father, John, worked for a doctor and when the doctor died John was left with nowhere to live and no money which compelled him to become an alcoholic. Mark and his younger brother Luke then took to burglary to escape their father who severely beat them. Mark and Luke made a fairly good sum out of burglary but it was at their fifteenth burglary that they were caught and convicted to fifteen years transportation to a penal colony despite conflicting evidence which was resolved by a man named John Hart
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Henry Kable
Henry Kable
Henry Kable
(1763–1846), a businessman, born in Laxfield, Suffolk, England, was one of the first convicts transported to Australia.Contents1 Conviction and transport to Australia 2 Life in Australia 3 Legacy 4 References 5 External linksConviction and transport to Australia[edit] On 18 March 1783, Kable was convicted of burglary at Thetford, Norfolk, England
England
and sentenced to death. His sentence was commuted to transportation for fourteen years to the United States, however, the American Revolution made transportation to America impossible and Henry was returned to the Norwich Castle gaol.[2] At Norwich Castle gaol, Henry met and began a relationship with Susannah Holmes, who gave birth in prison to a son Henry. Holmes had been sentenced to death on 22 March 1784 after being found guilty of theft
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Simeon Lord
1 adopted child: Joanna William nee Short (1792-1841)2 step-children John Henry Black (1799-1867) Mary Ann De Mestre nee Black (1801-1861)8 children with Mary Hyde: Sarah Ann Ramsay nee Lord (1806-1889) Louisa Dick nee Lord (1808-?) Simeon Lord
Simeon Lord
Jnr. (1810-1892) Francis Lord (1812-1897) Edward Lord (1814-1884) Thomas Lord (1816-1876) George Lord (1818-1880) Robert Charles Lord (1821-1857)Parent(s) Simeon Lord & Ann Fielden Simeon Lord
Simeon Lord
(c. 28 January 1771 – 29 January 1840)[1] was a pioneer merchant and a magistrate in Australia. He became a prominent trader in Sydney, buying and selling ship cargoes. Despite being an emancipist Lord was made a magistrate by Governor Lachlan Macquarie, and he became a frequent guest at government house. His business dealings were extensive. He became one of Sydney's wealthiest men
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Nathaniel Lucas
Nathaniel Lucas (1764–1818) was a convict transported to Australia on the First Fleet. His occupation was listed as carpenter.Contents1 Life 2 Norfolk Island 3 New South Wales 4 Death 5 References 6 External LinksLife[edit] Lucas was born in Leatherhead, Surrey, England, to parents John Lucas & Mary Bradford in 1764.[2] Lucas was tried at the Old Bailey, London
London
on 7 July 1784 for feloniously stealing clothing with a value of 40 shillings
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Norfolk Island
Norfolk Island
Norfolk Island
(/ˈnɔːrfək/ ( listen); Norfuk: Norf'k Ailen[8]) is a small island in the Pacific Ocean located between Australia, New Zealand, and New Caledonia, 1,412 kilometres (877 mi) directly east of mainland Australia's Evans Head, and about 900 kilometres (560 mi) from Lord Howe Island. Together with two neighbouring islands, it forms one of the Commonwealth of Australia's external territories. At the 2016 Australian census, it has 1,748 inhabitants living on a total area of about 35 km2 (14 sq mi).[7] Its capital is Kingston. Norfolk Island
Norfolk Island
was first settled by East Polynesians
Polynesians
but was long unpopulated when it was eventually also settled by Great Britain as part of its settlement of Australia
Australia
from 1788
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William Redfern
William Redfern (1774[1] – 17 July 1833) was an English-raised surgeon in early colonial Australia who was transported to New South Wales as a convict for his role in the Mutiny on the Nore.Contents1 Early life 2 Mutiny 3 Career on Norfolk Island 4 Career in New South Wales 5 Death 6 Legacy in New South Wales 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Dr William Redfern was born in County Antrim, probably Belfast, and raised in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England. He was surgeon's apprentice to his older brother Thomas and passed the examination of the London Company of Surgeons
Company of Surgeons
in 1797. He was commissioned as a surgeon's mate aboard the 64-gun HMS Standard.[2] Mutiny[edit] Redfern was aboard Standard in 1797 when the crew rose against the officers in the Mutiny of the Nore
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Mary Reibey
Mary Reibey
Mary Reibey
née Haydock (12 May 1777 – 30 May 1855) was an Australian merchant, shipowner and trader. Originally a convict deported to Australia, she was viewed by her contemporaries as a role model of success and became legendary as a successful businesswoman in the colony.Contents1 Early life 2 Life and career in Australia 3 Novels 4 See also 5 Bibliography 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Reibey, baptised Molly Haydock, was born on 12 May 1777 in Bury, Lancashire, England. She was a businesswoman and trader. Following the death of her parents, she was reared by a grandmother and sent into service. She ran away, and was arrested for stealing a horse in August 1791.[1] At the time, she was disguised as a boy and was going under the name of James Burrow.[2] Sentenced to seven years' transportation, she arrived in Sydney, Australia, on the Royal Admiral in October 1792.Letter written by Reibey to her aunt Penelope Hope
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Quintus Servinton
Henry Savery
Henry Savery
(4 August 1791 – 6 February 1842) was a convict transported to Port Arthur, Tasmania, and Australia's first novelist. It is generally agreed that his writing is more important for its historical value than its literary merit.[1]Contents1 Early life in England 2 Transported
Transported
to Van Diemens Land 3 See also 4 Bibliography 5 External links 6 ReferencesEarly life in England[edit] Henry Savery
Henry Savery
was born in Somerset, England into the family of a well to do banker.[2] Little else is known of his early years. He married Eliza Elliott Oliver, daughter of a London business man, and their only son was born in 1816
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William Field (Australian Pastoralist)
William Field (1774–1837) was a Tasmanian
Tasmanian
pastoralist, meat contractor and publican. Born in Enfield, near London, he spent his early working life as a farmer and butcher. At the age of 26 he was convicted of receiving stolen sheep from his brother, Richard,[1] and transported to Van Diemen's Land
Van Diemen's Land
in 1806, travelling on the Fortune to Sydney
Sydney
and then the Sophia to Port Dalrymple, leaving behind a wife, Sarah, and a daughter, Ann.[2] Richard had been sentenced to death in April 1800,[3] and then pardoned to be transported for life, and was further pardoned 19 August 1802 on giving surety.[4] By the time his 14-year sentence[5] had been completed Field had already proven himself useful to the new colony as a farmer and merchant
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Robert Sidaway
Robert Sidaway
Robert Sidaway
(14 January 1758 – 13 October 1809), a convict of the First Fleet, was transported to Australia
Australia
for stealing in 1788. Robert is known for being baker for the British Marines of Sydney
Sydney
and opening the first theatre in Sydney
Sydney
in 1796.Contents1 Life 2 Theatre 3 Land 4 Philanthropist 5 Death 6 See also 7 ReferencesLife[edit] Born to John and Elizabeth Sidaway of Horse Shoe Alley, Robert was baptised 5 February at St Leonards, Shoreditch, London, England.[1] On 11 September 1782 Sidaway was indicted at the Old Bailey
Old Bailey
for stealing on the 22d of June last, a deal box, value 1s; a cloth coat, value 12s; a waistcoat value 5s; a pair of breeches, value 5s; a linen waistcoat, value 2s; one pair of silk stockings, value 2s; and one pair of shoes, value 3s; the goods of different persons
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William Sykes (convict)
William Sykes (c. 1827 – 4 January 1891) was an English convict, transported to Western Australia for manslaughter.Contents1 Early life 2 Western Australia 3 Legacy 4 Notes 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Sykes was born in Wentworth, near Rotherham, Yorkshire, England c. 1827.[a] As a member of a poor family, he received no formal education, and took on paid work from an early age. In 1851 he was recorded as unmarried and working as a coal-pit trammer. In 1853 Sykes married Myra Wilcock, and over the next ten years they had four children. He was later employed as a puddler. On 10 October 1865, Sykes went poaching with a group of six other men. Evidence suggests that Sykes had often poached in the past, but he had never been caught before. On this night the men were challenged by a group of gamekeepers, and in making their escape Sykes and a number of other men assaulted one of the gamekeepers
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