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Engineering Officer (ship)
Ship (or marine) Engineering Officers or, simply, Ship Engineers are responsible for operating and maintaining the propulsion plants and support systems on board crew, passengers and cargo seafaring vessels[1] or other watercraft. Alternative terms commonly employed to collectively refer to the profession are seagoing or seafaring engineer officers. Ship engineers / officers are usually educated and qualified as engineering technicians. In the United States
United States
they are usually trained via cadet ships sponsored by a variety of maritime organizations. Engineering Officer Cadets of most countries are sponsored during training by a shipping company, serving their time on board ships owned by that company
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Engine Room
On a ship, the engine room or ER is the propulsion machinery spaces of the vessel. To increase a vessel's safety and chances of surviving damage, the machinery necessary for operations may be segregated into various spaces. The engine room is generally the largest physical compartment of the machinery space. It houses the vessel's prime mover, usually some variations of a heat engine - diesel engine, gas or steam turbine, or some combination of these (such as CODAG; see Category: Marine Propulsion). On some ships, the machinery space may comprise more than one engine room, such as forward and aft, or port or starboard engine rooms, or may be simply numbered. On a large percentage of vessels, ships and boats, the engine room is located near the bottom, and at the rear, or aft, end of the vessel, and usually comprises few compartments
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Coal Trimmer
A coal trimmer or trimmer is a position within the engineering department of a coal-fired ship which involves all coal handling tasks starting with the loading of coal into the ship and ending with the delivery of the coal to the stoker. The trimmers worked inside the coal bunkers located on top of and between the boilers. Trimmers used shovels and wheelbarrows to move coal around the bunkers in order to keep the coal level, and to shovel the coal down the coal chute to the firemen below, who shoveled it into the furnaces. If too much coal built up on one side of a coal bunker, the ship would actually list to that side. Trimmers were also involved in extinguishing fires in the coal bunkers. Fires occurred frequently due to spontaneous combustion of the coal. The fires had to be extinguished with fire hoses and by removing the burning coal by feeding it into the furnace.[1] Of the engineering crew, the trimmers were paid the least
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Angle Of List
The angle of list is the degree to which a vessel heels (leans or tilts) to either port or starboard.[1] A listing vessel is stable and at equilibrium, but the distribution of weight aboard (often caused by uneven loading or flooding) causes it to heel to one side. By contrast roll is the dynamic movement from side to side caused by waves. If a listing ship goes beyond the point where a righting moment will keep it afloat, it will capsize and potentially sink. See also[edit]Angle of loll Heeling (sailing) Keeled over Metacentric height Ship stabilityReferences[edit]^ Kemp, Peter (1976). The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea. p. 488
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Dewatering
Dewatering /diːˈwɔːtərɪŋ/ is the removal of water from solid material or soil by wet classification, centrifugation, filtration, or similar solid-liquid separation processes, such as removal of residual liquid from a filter cake by a filter press as part of various industrial processes. Construction dewatering, unwatering, or water control are common terms used to describe removal or draining groundwater or surface water from a riverbed, construction site, caisson, or mine shaft, by pumping or evaporation. On a construction site, this dewatering may be implemented before subsurface excavation for foundations, shoring, or cellar space to lower the water table
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Compartment (ship)
A compartment is a portion of the space within a ship defined vertically between decks and horizontally between bulkheads. It is analogous to a room within a building, and may provide watertight subdivision of the ship's hull important in retaining buoyancy if the hull is damaged
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Capsizing
Capsizing
Capsizing
or keeling over occurs when a boat or ship is turned on its side or it is upside down in the water. The act of reversing a capsized vessel is called righting. If a capsized vessel has enough flotation to prevent sinking, it may recover on its own if the stability is such that it is not stable inverted. Vessels of this design are called self-righting.Contents1 Small vessels 2 Large vessels 3 Competition 4 Training 5 Prevention5.1 Yachts 5.2 Large ships6 Notable capsizings 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksSmall vessels[edit] In dinghy sailing, a practical distinction can be made between being knocked down (to 90 degrees) which is called a capsize, and being inverted, which is called being turtled. Small dinghies frequently capsize in the normal course of use and can usually be recovered by the crew
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Pump
A pump is a device that moves fluids (liquids or gases), or sometimes slurries, by mechanical action. Pumps can be classified into three major groups according to the method they use to move the fluid: direct lift, displacement, and gravity pumps.[1] Pumps operate by some mechanism (typically reciprocating or rotary), and consume energy to perform mechanical work by moving the fluid. Pumps operate via many energy sources, including manual operation, electricity, engines, or wind power, come in many sizes, from microscopic for use in medical applications to large industrial pumps. Mechanical pumps serve in a wide range of applications such as pumping water from wells, aquarium filtering, pond filtering and aeration, in the car industry for water-cooling and fuel injection, in the energy industry for pumping oil and natural gas or for operating cooling towers
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Centrifugal Fan
A centrifugal fan is a mechanical device for moving air or other gases. The terms "blower" and "squirrel cage fan", (because it looks like a hamster wheel), are frequently used as synonyms. These fans increase the speed and volume of an air stream with the rotating impellers.[1] Centrifugal fans use the kinetic energy of the impellers to increase the volume of the air stream, which in turn moves them against the resistance caused by ducts, dampers and other components. Centrifugal fans displace air radially, changing the direction (typically by 90°) of the airflow
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Compressors
A compressor is a mechanical device that increases the pressure of a gas by reducing its volume. An air compressor is a specific type of gas compressor. Compressors are similar to pumps: both increase the pressure on a fluid and both can transport the fluid through a pipe. As gases are compressible, the compressor also reduces the volume of a gas
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Windlass
The windlass /ˈwɪndləs/ is an apparatus for moving heavy weights. Typically, a windlass consists of a horizontal cylinder (barrel), which is rotated by the turn of a crank or belt. A winch is affixed to one or both ends, and a cable or rope is wound around the winch, pulling a weight attached to the opposite end. The oldest depiction of a windlass for raising water can be found in the Book of Agriculture published in 1313 by the Chinese official Wang Zhen of the Yuan Dynasty (fl
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Fireman (steam Engine)
Fireman or stoker is the job title for someone whose job is to tend the fire for the running of a steam engine. On steam locomotives the term fireman is usually used, while on steamships and stationary steam engines, such as those driving saw mills, the term is usually stoker (although the British Merchant Navy
British Merchant Navy
did use fireman). The German word Heizer is equivalent and in Dutch the word stoker is mostly used too. The United States Navy
United States Navy
referred to them as watertenders
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William Symington
William Symington
William Symington
(1764–1831) was a Scottish engineer and inventor, and the builder of the first practical steamboat, the Charlotte Dundas.Contents1 Early life 2 Improvements to Watt's design 3 Dalswinton steamboat 4 The canal steamboat 5 Mines and mills 6 More steamboats 7 The Charlotte Dundas 8 Colliery manager 9 Last years 10 References 11 External linksEarly life[edit] Symington was born in Leadhills, South Lanarkshire, Scotland, to a family he described as being "respectable but not wealthy." His father worked as a practical mechanic at the Leadhills
Leadhills
mines. Although his parents intended for him to enter the ministry, he intended to use his good education to make a career as an engineer. So, in 1785, he joined his brother George in his attempts to build a steam engine at Wanlockhead, Dumfriesshire
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Nuclear Technology
Nuclear technology
Nuclear technology
is technology that involves the nuclear reactions of atomic nuclei. Among the notable nuclear technologies are nuclear reactors, nuclear medicine and nuclear weapons. It is also used, among other things, in smoke detectors and gun sights.Contents1 History and scientific background1.1 Discovery 1.2 Nuclear fission 1.3 Nuclear fusion2 Nuclear weapons 3 Civilian uses3.1 Nuclear power 3.2 Medical applications 3.3 Industrial applications 3.4 Commercial applications 3.5 Food processing and agriculture4 Accidents 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory and scientific background[edit] Discovery[edit] Main article: Nuclear physics The vast majority of common, natural phenomena on Earth only involve gravity and electromagnetism, and not nuclear reactions
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Turbinia
Turbinia
Turbinia
was the first steam turbine-powered steamship. Built as an experimental vessel in 1894, and easily the fastest ship in the world at that time, Turbinia
Turbinia
was demonstrated dramatically at the Spithead Navy Review in 1897 and set the standard for the next generation of steamships, the majority of which were turbine powered
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University Of Michigan
The University of Michigan
Michigan
(UM, U-M, U of M, or UMich), often simply referred to as Michigan, is a public research university in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The University of Michigan
Michigan
is the state's oldest university, founded in 1817 in Detroit, Michigan
Michigan
as the Catholepistemiad, or University of Michigania, 20 years before the Michigan
Michigan
Territory became a state. It moved to Ann Arbor in 1837 onto 40 acres (16 ha) of what is now known as Central Campus. Since its establishment in Ann Arbor, the university campus has expanded to include more than 584 major buildings with a combined area of more than 34 million gross square feet (780 acres; 3.2 km2) spread out over a Central Campus and North Campus, two regional campuses in Flint and Dearborn, and a Center in Detroit
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