HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Encouraging Or Assisting A Crime In English Law
Encouraging or assisting a crime is itself a crime in English law, by virtue of the Serious Crime Act 2007
[...More...]

"Encouraging Or Assisting A Crime In English Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

English Law
English law
English law
is the common law legal system of England and Wales, comprising mainly criminal law and civil law, each branch having its own courts and procedures.[1][2]Contents1 Principal elements of English law 2 Legal terminology2.1 Criminal law & civil law 2.2 Common law
[...More...]

"English Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Medical Procedure
A medical procedure is a course of action intended to achieve a result in the delivery of healthcare. A medical procedure with the intention of determining, measuring, or diagnosing a patient condition or parameter is also called a medical test
[...More...]

"Medical Procedure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sporting Event
Sport
Sport
(British English) or sports (American English) includes all forms of competitive physical activity or games which,[1] through casual or organised participation, aim to use, maintain or improve physical ability and skills while providing enjoyment to participants, and in some cases, entertainment for spectators.[2] Usually the contest or game is between two sides, each attempting to exceed the other. Some sports allow a tie game; others provide tie-breaking methods, to ensure one winner and one loser. A number of such two-sided contests may be arranged in a tournament producing a champion. Many sports leagues make an annual champion by arranging games in a regular sports season, followed in some cases by playoffs. Hundreds of sports exist, from those between single contestants, through to those with hundreds of simultaneous participants, either in teams or competing as individuals
[...More...]

"Sporting Event" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Oxford University Press
Oxford
Oxford
University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world,[1] and the second oldest after Cambridge University
Cambridge University
Press. It is a department of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
and is governed by a group of 15 academics appointed by the vice-chancellor known as the delegates of the press. They are headed by the secretary to the delegates, who serves as OUP's chief executive and as its major representative on other university bodies
[...More...]

"Oxford University Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Virtual Certainty
Moral certainty is a concept of intuitive probability. It means a very high degree of probability, sufficient for action, but short of absolute or mathematical certainty.Contents1 Origins 2 Law 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksOrigins[edit] The notion of different degrees of certainty can be traced back to a statement in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics
Nicomachean Ethics
that one must be content with the kind of certainty appropriate to different subject matters, so that in practical decisions one cannot expect the certainty of mathematics
[...More...]

"Virtual Certainty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Principal (criminal Law)
Under criminal law, a principal is any actor who is primarily responsible for a criminal offense.[1] Such an actor is distinguished from others who may also be subject to criminal liability as accomplices, accessories or conspirators. See also[edit]Principal (commercial law)Notes and references[edit]^ See, e.g., Superior Growers, 982 F.2d at 177-78; United States v. Campa, 679 F.2d 1006, 1013 (lst Cir. 1982).External links[edit] "Principal. A legal term . .". New International Encyclopedia. 1905. This legal term article is a stub
[...More...]

"Principal (criminal Law)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Accessory (legal Term)
An accessory is a person who assists in the commission of a crime, but who does not actually participate in the commission of the crime as a joint principal. The distinction between an accessory and a principal is a question of fact and degree:The principal is the one whose acts or omissions, accompanied by the relevant mens rea ( Latin
Latin
for "guilty mind"), are the most immediate cause of the actus reus ( Latin
Latin
for "guilty act"). If two or more people are directly responsible for the actus reus, they can be charged as joint principals (see common purpose)
[...More...]

"Accessory (legal Term)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Radar Gun
A radar speed gun (also radar gun and speed gun) is a device used to measure the speed of moving objects. It is used in law-enforcement to measure the speed of moving vehicles and is often used in professional spectator sport, for things such as the measurement of bowling speeds in cricket, speed of pitched baseballs, athletes and tennis serves. A radar speed gun is a Doppler radar
Doppler radar
unit that may be hand-held, vehicle-mounted or static. It measures the speed of the objects at which it is pointed by detecting a change in frequency of the returned radar signal caused by the Doppler effect, whereby the frequency of the returned signal is increased in proportion to the object's speed of approach if the object is approaching, and lowered if the object is receding
[...More...]

"Radar Gun" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Homicide In English Law
English law
English law
contains homicide offences – those acts involving the death of another person. For a crime to be considered homicide, it must take place after the victim's legally recognised birth, and before their legal death. There is also the usually uncontroversial requirement that the victim be under the "Queen's peace". The death must be causally linked to the actions of the defendant. Since the abolition of the year and a day rule, there is no maximum time period between any act being committed and the victim's death, so long as the former caused the latter. There are two general types of homicide, murder and manslaughter. Murder requires an intention to kill or an intention to commit grievous bodily harm. If this intention is present but there are certain types of mitigating factors – loss of control, diminished responsibility, or pursuance of a suicide pact – then this is voluntary manslaughter
[...More...]

"Homicide In English Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Criminal Law Act 1967
The Criminal Law Act 1967 (c.58) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. However, with some minor exceptions, it generally applies to only England and Wales. It made some major changes to English criminal law. Most of it is still in force. Several of the Act's provisions were adopted, word for word, for Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
by the Criminal Law Act (Northern Ireland) 1967
Criminal Law Act (Northern Ireland) 1967
(c 18) (NI) and the Criminal Justice (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act (Northern Ireland) 1968 (c 28) (NI). They were adopted for the Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
by the Criminal Law Act 1997. The Act has three parts. Part I abolished the distinction between felony and misdemeanour and makes consequential provisions. Part II abolished a number of obsolete crimes
[...More...]

"Criminal Law Act 1967" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Self-defence In English Law
Self-defence is a legal doctrine which says that a person may use reasonable force in the defence of themself or another.[1] This defence arises both from common law and the Criminal Law Act 1967. Self-defence is a justification rather than an excuse, that is, the defence says that the person's actions were not a crime at all.[a]^ For the rationale of self-defence see: Boaz Sangero, Self-Defence in Criminal Law 11 - 106 (Hart Publishing, 2006)Contents1 Discussion1.1 Common law
Common law
(self defence) 1.2 Reasonable force 1.3 Beliefs 1.4 Drink and drugs 1.5 Statutory provision2 Arrest and private citizens 3 Law enforcement by police officers 4 Law enforcement by soldiers 5 Defence of property 6 Reform 7 See also 8 ReferencesDiscussion[edit] Common law
Common law
(self defence)[edit] Self-defence in English law is a complete defence to all non-sexual offences involving the unlawful use of force (i.e
[...More...]

"Self-defence In English Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Common Purpose
The doctrine of common purpose, common design, joint enterprise, or joint criminal enterprise is a common law legal doctrine that imputes criminal liability to the participants in a criminal enterprise for all that results from that enterprise. A common application of the rule is to impute criminal liability for wounding a person to participants in a riot who knew, or were reckless as to knowing, that one of their number had a knife and might use it, despite the fact that the other participants did not have knives themselves
[...More...]

"Common Purpose" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Duress In English Law
Duress
Duress
in English law is a complete common law defence, operating in favour of those who commit crimes because they are forced or compelled to do so by the circumstances, or the threats of another
[...More...]

"Duress In English Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.