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Enchele
The Enchelii[1] (also Enchelei[2] or Encheleans),[3] the habitants of Enchele (Greek: Ἐγχέλιοι/Ἐγχελεῖς, Enchelioi/Encheleis; Latin: Enchelii/Encheleae; name of the country: Ἐγχέλη, Enchele; demonym: Enchelean),[4] were an Illyrian tribe that lived around the region of Lake Ohrid[5] and Lynkestis,[6][1] in modern-day Albania, the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and Greece. Their name in ancient Greek meant "eel-people". They were often at war for domination of the region with the ancient Macedonians who settled in the east
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Ancient Greek
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Delphi
Delphi
Delphi
(/ˈdɛlfaɪ/ or /ˈdɛlfi/; Greek: Δελφοί [ðelˈfi])[1] is famous as the ancient sanctuary that grew rich as the seat of Pythia, the oracle consulted about important decisions throughout the ancient classical world. Moreover, the Greeks considered Delphi
Delphi
the navel (or centre) of the world, as represented by the stone monument known as the Omphalos
Omphalos
of Delphi. It occupies an impressive site on the south-western slope of Mount Parnassus, overlooking the coastal plain to the south and the valley of Phocis. It is now an extensive archaeological site with a modern town of the same name nearby
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Harmonia (mythology)
Harmonia (/hɑːrˈmoʊniə/; Ancient Greek: Ἁρμονία), in Greek mythology, is the immortal goddess of harmony and concord. Her Roman counterpart is Concordia, and her Greek opposite is Eris, whose Roman counterpart is Discordia. There was also a nymph called Harmonia
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Budva
Budva
Budva
(Montenegrin Cyrillic: Будва, pronounced [bûːdv̞a] or [bûdv̞a]) is a Montenegrin town on the Adriatic Sea, former bishopric and present Latin Catholic titular see. It has around 14,000 inhabitants, and it is the centre of Budva
Budva
Municipality. The coastal area around Budva, called the Budva
Budva
riviera, is the center of Montenegrin tourism, known for its well-preserved medieval walled city, sandy beaches and diverse nightlife
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Periplus Of Pseudo-Skylax
The Periplus
Periplus
of Pseudo-Scylax is an ancient Greek periplus (περίπλους períplous, 'circumnavigation') describing the sea route around the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
and Black Sea. It probably dates from the mid-4th century BC, specifically the 330s, and was probably written at or near Athens. Its author is often included among the ranks of 'minor' Greek geographers
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Black Drin
The Black Drin, or Black Drim (Albanian: Drini i Zi: meaning "it shines" from the Albanian word "ndrin", to shine, because of its extremely clear waters; Macedonian: Црн Дрим, translit. Crn Drim) is a river in the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and Albania. It flows out of Lake Ohrid
Lake Ohrid
in Struga, Macedonia. After about 56 km (35 mi) it crosses the border to Albania, west of Debar, Macedonia. It merges with the White Drin in Kukës
Kukës
to form the Drin, which flows into the Adriatic Sea. It drains most of the eastern border region of Albania.Black Drim in StrugaBlack Drim flowing out of Lake Ohrid.Agriculture[edit] This part of Albania
Albania
is an agricultural-based site. The main agricultural products are corn and barley; silviculture is evolving, as well
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Herodotus
Herodotus
Herodotus
(/hɪˈrɒdətəs/; Ancient Greek: Ἡρόδοτος, Hêródotos, Attic Greek
Attic Greek
pronunciation: [hɛː.ró.do.tos]) was a Greek historian who was born in Halicarnassus
Halicarnassus
in the Persian Empire (modern-day Bodrum, Turkey) and lived in the fifth century BC (c. 484–c. 425 BC), a contemporary of Thucydides, Socrates, and Euripides
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Ancient Thebes (Boeotia)
Thebes (/θiːbz/; Ancient Greek: Θῆβαι, Thēbai, Greek pronunciation: [tʰɛ̂ːbai̯];[2] Greek: Θήβα, Thíva [ˈθiva]) is a city in Boeotia, central Greece. It played an important role in Greek myths, as the site of the stories of Cadmus, Oedipus, Dionysus
Dionysus
and others. Archaeological excavations in and around Thebes have revealed a Mycenaean settlement and clay tablets written in the Linear B
Linear B
script, indicating the importance of the site in the Bronze Age. Thebes was the largest city of the ancient region of Boeotia
Boeotia
and was the leader of the Boeotian confederacy. It was a major rival of ancient Athens, and sided with the Persians during the 480 BC invasion under Xerxes. Theban forces under the command of Epaminondas ended the power of Sparta
Sparta
at the Battle of Leuctra
Battle of Leuctra
in 371 BC
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Cadmus
In Greek mythology, Cadmus
Cadmus
(/ˈkædməs/; Greek: Κάδμος Kadmos), was the founder and first king of Thebes.[1] Cadmus
Cadmus
was the first
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Philip Of Macedon
Macedonia (/ˌmæsɪˈdoʊniə/ ( listen)) or Macedon (/ˈmæsɪˌdɒn/; Greek: Μακεδονία, Makedonía) was an ancient kingdom on the periphery of Archaic and Classical Greece,[4] and later the dominant state of Hellenistic Greece.[5] The kingdom was founded and initially ruled by the royal Argead dynasty, which was followed by the Antipatrid and Antigonid dynasties
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Sic
The Latin
Latin
adverb sic ("thus", "just as"; in full: sic erat scriptum, "thus was it written")[1] inserted after a quoted word or passage indicates that the quoted matter has been transcribed exactly as found in the source text, complete with any erroneous or archaic spelling, surprising assertion, faulty reasoning, or other matter that might otherwise be taken as an error of transcription. The usual usage is to inform the reader that any errors or apparent errors in quoted material do not arise from errors in the course of the transcription, but are intentionally reproduced, exactly as they appear in the source text
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Bibliotheca (Pseudo-Apollodorus)
The Bibliotheca (Ancient Greek: Βιβλιοθήκη Bibliothēkē, "Library"), also known as the Bibliotheca of Pseudo-Apollodorus, is a compendium of Greek myths and heroic legends, arranged in three books, generally dated to the first or second century AD.[1] The author was traditionally thought to be Apollodorus of Athens, but that attribution is now regarded as false, and so "Pseudo-" was added to Apollodorus. The Bibliotheca has been called "the most valuable mythographical work that has come down from ancient times".[2] An epigram recorded by the important intellectual Patriarch Photius I of Constantinople
Patriarch Photius I of Constantinople
expressed its purpose:It has the following not ungraceful epigram: 'Draw your knowledge of the past from me and read the ancient tales of learned lore. Look neither at the page of Homer, nor of elegy, nor tragic muse, nor epic strain
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