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Empire Of Japan
The Empire of Japan
Japan
(大日本帝國, Dai Nippon Teikoku, literally meaning "Great Japanese Empire")[9] was the historical nation-state[nb 2] and great power that existed from the Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
in 1868 to the enactment of the 1947 constitution of modern Japan.[1] Japan's rapid industrialization and militarization under the slogan Fukoku Kyōhei (富國強兵, "Enrich the Country, Strengthen the Armed Forces") led to its emergence as a world power and the establishment of a colonial empire
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German New Guinea
German New Guinea
New Guinea
(German: Deutsch-Neuguinea) was the first part of the German colonial empire. It was a protectorate from 1884 until 1914 when it fell to Australian forces following the outbreak of the First World War. It consisted of the northeastern part of New Guinea
New Guinea
and several nearby island groups. The mainland part of German New Guinea and the nearby islands of the Bismarck Archipelago
Bismarck Archipelago
and the North Solomon Islands are now part of Papua New Guinea. The Micronesian islands of German New Guinea
New Guinea
are now governed as the Federated States of Micronesia, the Marshall Islands, Nauru, the Northern Mariana Islands and Palau. The mainland portion, Kaiser-Wilhelmsland, was formed from the northeastern part of New Guinea
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Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
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List Of Countries By Population
This is a list of countries and dependent territories by population. It includes sovereign states, inhabited dependent territories and, in some cases, constituent countries of sovereign states, with inclusion within the list being primarily based on the ISO standard ISO 3166-1. For instance, the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is considered as a single entity while the constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
Kingdom of the Netherlands
are considered separately. In addition, this list includes certain states with limited recognition not found in ISO 3166-1. The population figures do not reflect the practice of countries that report significantly different populations of citizens domestically and overall
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Occupation Of Japan
A job, or occupation, is a person's role in society. More specifically, a job is an activity, often regular and often performed in exchange for payment ("for a living"). Many people have multiple jobs (e.g., parent, homemaker, and employee). A person can begin a job by becoming an employee, volunteering, starting a business, or becoming a parent. The duration of a job may range from temporary (e.g., hourly odd jobs) to a lifetime (e.g., judges). An activity that requires a person's mental or physical effort is work (as in "a day's work"). If a person is trained for a certain type of job, they may have a profession. Typically, a job would be a subset of someone's career
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Totalitarianism
Totalitarianism
Totalitarianism
is a political concept where the state recognizes no limits to its authority and strives to regulate every aspect of public and private life wherever feasible.[1] Totalitarian regimes stay in political power through rule by one leader and an all-encompassing propaganda campaign, which is disseminated through the state-controlled mass media, a single party that is often marked by political repression, personality cultism, control over the economy, regulation and restriction of speech, mass surveillance and widespread use of terror. A distinctive feature of totalitarian governments is an "elaborate ideology, a set of ideas that gives meaning and direction to the whole society".[2] The concept was first developed in the 1920s by the Weimar German jurist and later Nazi academic Carl Schmitt
Carl Schmitt
as well as Italian fascists
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Constitutional Monarchy
A constitutional monarchy is a form of monarchy in which the sovereign exercise authority in accordance with a written or unwritten constitution.[1] Constitutional monarchy
Constitutional monarchy
differs from absolute monarchy (in which a monarch holds absolute power), in that constitutional monarchs are bound to exercise their powers and authorities within the limits prescribed within an established legal framework
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State Religion
A state religion (also called an established religion or official religion) is a religious body or creed officially endorsed by the state. A state with an official religion, while not secular, is not necessarily a theocracy, a country whose rulers have both secular and spiritual authority. State religions are official or government-sanctioned establishments of a religion, but the state does not need be under the control of the religion (as in a theocracy) nor is the state-sanctioned religion necessarily under the control of the state. Official religions have been known throughout human history in almost all types of cultures, reaching into the Ancient Near East
Ancient Near East
and prehistory. The relation of religious cult and the state was discussed by Varro, under the term of theologia civilis ("civic theology")
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List Of Countries And Dependencies By Area
This is a list of the world's countries and their dependent territories by area, ranked by total area. Entries in this list, include, but are not limited to, those in the ISO standard 3166-1, which includes sovereign states and dependent territories
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Concession (territory)
In international law, a concession is a territory within a country that is administered by an entity other than the state which holds sovereignty over it[citation needed].This is usually a colonizing power, or at least mandated by one, as in the case of colonial chartered companies
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United Nations Trust Territories
United Nations trust territories were the successors of the remaining League of Nations mandates, and came into being when the League of Nations ceased to exist in 1946. All of the trust territories were administered through the United Nations Trusteeship Council. The one territory not turned over was South-West Africa, which South Africa insisted remained under the League of Nations Mandate. It eventually gained independence in 1990 as Namibia
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Tokyo City
Tokyo City (東京市, Tōkyō-shi) was a municipality in Japan and part of Tokyo-fu which existed from 1 May 1889 until its merger with its prefecture on 1 July 1943.[1] The historical boundaries of Tokyo City are now occupied by the 23 Special Wards of Tokyo. The new merged government became what is now Tokyo, also known as the Tokyo Metropolis, or, ambiguously, Tokyo Prefecture.Contents1 History 2 Wards 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksHistory[edit] See also: History of Tokyo In 1868, the medieval city of Edo, seat of the Tokugawa government, was renamed Tokyo, and the offices of Tokyo Prefecture (-fu) were opened.[1] The extent of Tokyo Prefecture was initially limited to the former Edo city, but rapidly augmented to be comparable with the present Tokyo Metropolis
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Taiwan Under Qing Rule
Taiwan under Qing rule refers to the rule of the Qing dynasty over Formosa (modern-day Taiwan) and the Pescadores (Penghu) from 1683 to 1895. The Qing court sent an army led by general Shi Lang and annexed Taiwan in 1683. It was governed as Taiwan Prefecture of Fokien Province (Fujian) until the declaration of Fokien-Taiwan Province in 1887
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Japanese Military Yen
Japanese military yen
Japanese military yen
(Chinese and Japanese: 日本軍用手票, also 日本軍票 in short), commonly abbreviated as JMY[citation needed], was the currency issued to the soldiers of the Imperial Japanese Army and the Imperial Japanese Navy
Imperial Japanese Navy
as a salary[citation needed]. The Imperial Japanese government first started issuing the military yen during the Russo-Japanese War
Russo-Japanese War
in 1904.[citation needed] The military yen reached its peak during the Pacific War
Pacific War
period, when the Japanese government excessively[clarification needed] issued it to all of its occupied territories
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Korean Yen
The Korean yen was the currency of Korea between 1910 and 1945. It was equivalent to the Japanese yen and consisted of Japanese currency and banknotes issued specifically for Korea. The yen was subdivided into 100 sen. It replaced the Korean won at par and was replaced by the South Korean won and the North Korean won at par. Banknotes[edit] From 1902-1910, banknotes were issued by Dai Ichi Ginko (First National Bank of Japan, 株式會社第一銀行, Kabushiki Gaisha Daiichi Ginkō). Denominations included 10 sen, 20 sen, 50 sen, 1 yen, 5 yen, and 10 yen. The sen notes were vertical and resembled the Japanese sen notes of 1872 and the Japanese military yen at the turn of the century. These notes were redeemable in "Japanese Currency at any of its Branches in Korea". In 1909, the Bank of Korea (1909) (韓國銀行) was founded in Seoul as a central bank and began issuing currency of modern type. Bank of Korea notes were dated 1909 and issued in 1910 and 1911
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Shigeru Yoshida
Shigeru Yoshida
Shigeru Yoshida
(吉田 茂, Yoshida Shigeru), KCVO (22 September 1878 – 20 October 1967) was a Japanese diplomat and politician who served as Prime Minister of Japan
Prime Minister of Japan
from 1946 to 1947 and from 1948 to 1954, becoming one of the longest serving PMs in Japanese history as the second-longest serving Prime Minister of Post-occupation Japan.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Diplomatic career 3 During World War II 4 Prime Ministership 5 Later years 6 Personal life 7 Honours 8 Selected works 9 Notes 10 References10.1 Further reading11 External linksEarly life and education[edit]Yoshida as a childYoshida was born in Yokosuka
Yokosuka
in 1878. His father, Takeuchi Tsuna, was an entrepreneur and political activist who would later serve in the first National Diet
National Diet
in 1890. Yoshida was the fifth of his fourteen children
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