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Emperor Renzong Of Song
Emperor Renzong of Song
Emperor Renzong of Song
(30 May 1010 – 30 April 1063, Chinese calendar: 14 April 1010(the 3rd year of Dazhongxiangfu, 大中祥符三年) - 29 March 1063 (the 8th year of Jiayou, 嘉祐八年)), personal name Zhao Zhen, was the fourth emperor of the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
in China. He reigned for about 41 years from 1022 to his death in 1063, and was the longest reigning Song dynasty
Song dynasty
emperor. He was the sixth son of his predecessor, Emperor Zhenzong, and was succeeded by his cousin's son, Emperor Yingzong, because his own sons died prematurely. His original personal name was Zhao Shouyi but it was changed by imperial decree in 1018 to "Zhao Zhen", which means 'auspicious' in Chinese. Compared to other famous Chinese emperors, Emperor Renzong is not widely known
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Hanging Scroll
A hanging scroll (Chinese: 立軸; pinyin: lìzhóu; also called 軸 or 掛軸)[1] is one of the many traditional ways to display and exhibit East Asian painting and calligraphy
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Ouyang Xiu
Ouyang
Ouyang
Xiu (1007 – 22 September 1072), courtesy name Yongshu, was a Chinese statesman, historian, essayist, calligrapher and poet of the Song Dynasty.Investigation of potential copyright issue Please note this is about the text of this article; it should not be taken to reflect on the subject of this article. Do not restore or edit the blanked content on this page until the issue is resolved by an administrator, copyright clerk or OTRS agent.If you have just labeled this page as a potential copyright issue, please follow the instructions for filing at the bottom of the box.The previous content of this page or section has been identified as posing a potential copyright issue, as a copy or modification of the text from the source(s) below, and is now listed on Wikipedia:Copyright problems (listing): Frederick W. Mote (1999). Imperial China: 900–1800. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press
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National Palace Museum
www.npm.gov.tw south.npm.gov.twNational Palace MuseumTraditional Chinese 國立故宮博物院Simplified Chinese 国立故宫博物院TranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin Guólì gùgōng bówùyuànWade–Giles Kuo2-li4 ku4-kung1 po2-wu4-yüan4IPA [kwǒlî kûkʊ́ŋ pwǒ.û.ɥɛ̂n]Southern MinTâi-lô Kok-li̍p Kòo-kiong Phok-bu̍t-īnnThe National Palace Museum,[3] located in Taipei
Taipei
and Taibao, Taiwan, has a permanent collection of nearly 700,000 pieces of ancient Chinese imperial artifacts and artworks, making it one of the largest of its type in the world. The collection encompasses 8,000 years of history of Chinese art
Chinese art
from the Neolithic
Neolithic
age to the modern.[4] Most of the collection are high quality pieces collected by China's emperors
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Tangut People
The Tangut first appeared as a tribal union living under Tuyuhun authority[1] and moved to Northwest China
Northwest China
sometime before the 10th century to found the Western Xia
Western Xia
or Tangut Empire (1038–1227). They were a Tibeto-Burman-speaking people.[2]Contents1 Origin 2 Culture 3 History 4 Religion 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksOrigin[edit] See also: Timeline of the Tanguts The Tanguts are typically regarded by Chinese scholars to be synonymous with or at least related to the Qiang or Dangxiang (党項; Dǎngxiàng). Historically, "Qiang" was a collective term for the multiple ethnic groups who lived on the western borderlands of China. The name Tangut first appears in the Orkhon inscriptions
Orkhon inscriptions
of 735. In their own Tangut language, the Tanguts called themselves Mi-niah (Miñak)
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Western Xia
The Western Xia
Western Xia
(/ʃjɑː/;[2] Chinese: 西夏; pinyin: Xī Xià; Wade–Giles: Hsi1 Hsia4), also known as the Xi Xia Empire, to the Mongols
Mongols
as the Tangut Empire and to the Tangut people
Tangut people
themselves and to the Tibetans as Mi-nyak,[3] was an empire which existed from 1038 to 1227 in what are now the northwestern Chinese provinces of Ningxia, Gansu, eastern Qinghai, northern Shaanxi, northeastern Xinjiang, southwest Inner Mongolia, and southernmost Outer Mongolia, measuring about 800,000 square kilometres (310,000 square miles).[4][5][6] The early capital was established at Ningxia
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Khitan People
Animism • Taoism
Taoism
 • Buddhism
Buddhism
 • Islam
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Liao Dynasty
The Liao dynasty
Liao dynasty
(/ljaʊ/;[3] Khitan: Mos Jælud; simplified Chinese: 辽朝; traditional Chinese: 遼朝; pinyin: Liáo cháo),[4] also known as the Liao Empire, officially the Great Liao (simplified Chinese: 大辽; traditional Chinese: 大遼; pinyin: Dà Liáo), or the Khitan Empire (Khitan: Mos diau-d kitai huldʒi gur ),[5], was an empire in East Asia
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History Of Song
The History of Song or Song Shi (Sòng Shǐ) is one of the official Chinese historical works known as the Twenty-Four Histories of China that records the history of the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(960–1279). It was commissioned in 1343 and compiled under the direction of First Minister Toqto'a and Prime Minister Alutu (阿鲁图/阿魯圖) during the Yuan dynasty
Yuan dynasty
(1279–1368) at the same time as the History of Liao and the History of Jin
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Song Dynasty
The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(/sɔːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 宋朝; pinyin: Sòng cháo; 960–1279) was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and continued until 1279. It was founded by Emperor Taizu of Song following his usurpation of the throne of Later Zhou, ending the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The Song often came into conflict with the contemporary Liao and Western Xia
Western Xia
dynasties in the north and was conquered by the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy. This dynasty also saw the first known use of gunpowder, as well as the first discernment of true north using a compass. The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
is divided into two distinct periods, Northern and Southern
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Mei Yaochen
Mei Yaochen (traditional Chinese: 梅堯臣; simplified Chinese: 梅尧臣; pinyin: Méi Yáochén; Wade–Giles: Mei Yao-ch'en) (1002–1060) was a poet of the Song dynasty. He was one of the pioneers of the "new subjective" style of poetry which characterized Song poetry.[1] Mei Yaochen was born in Xuancheng in present-day Anhui Province. His style name was 'Sheng Yu' (圣俞).[1] He passed the jinshi exam in 1051 and had a career in the civil service, but was unsuccessful. He was a prolific poet, with around 3000 works extant; he was popularized as a poet by the younger Ouyang Xiu. Most of his works are in the shi form, but they are much freer in content than those of the Tang dynasty
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Chinese Calendar
The traditional Chinese calendar
Chinese calendar
is a lunisolar calendar which reckons years, months and days according to astronomical phenomena. It was developed by the Qin Dynasty. As of 2017[update], the Chinese calendar is defined by GB/T 33661-2017 Calculation and promulgation of the Chinese calendar, which the Standardization Administration of China issued on May 12, 2017. The Chinese calendar
Chinese calendar
governs traditional activities in China and in overseas-Chinese communities. It depicts and lists the dates of traditional Chinese holidays, and guides Chinese people in selecting the most auspicious days for weddings, funerals, moving, or beginning a business. In the Chinese calendar
Chinese calendar
the days begin and end at midnight. The months begin on the day with the dark (new) moon. The years begin with the dark moon near the midpoint between winter solstice and spring equinox
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Su Xun
Su Xun (22 May 1009 – 21 May 1066) was a Song dynasty writer, best known for his essays. He is considered one of the Eight Masters of the Tang and Song, along with his sons Su Shi and Su Zhe. A famous story (popularized by the 13th-century children's text Three Character Classic) relates how Su Xun (also known as Su Laoquan) didn't begin to serious study until he was 27, an age considered too old to start learning. Su Xun persevered and became a highly respected writer.v t eEight Great Literati of Tang and Song DynastiesTang dynastyLiu Zongyuan Han YuSong dynastyWang Anshi Ouyang Xiu Su Zhe Su Shi Su Xun Zeng GongThis article about a Chinese writer or poet is a stub
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Su Zhe
Su Zhe (Chinese: 苏辙; 1039–1112), or Su Che in Taiwanese Mandarin, was a politician and essayist from Meishan, in modern Sichuan
Sichuan
Province, China. As it was common for people in ancient China to have alternative names, he was also called "Zi You" or "Tong Shu". Su was highly honored as a politician and essayist in the Song Dynasty, as were his father Su Xun and his elder brother Su Shi. All of them were among "The Eight Great Men of Letters of the Tang and Song Dynasties". Sansu temple[1] where they lived was rebuilt into Sansu Museum[2] in 1984, and this building has been one of the most famous cultural attractions
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Zeng Gong
Zeng Gong (Chinese: 曾鞏; pinyin: Zēng Gǒng, 1019–1083), courtesy name Zigu (子固), was a Chinese scholar and historian of the Song Dynasty in China. He was one of the supporters of the New Classical Prose Movement (新古文運動) and is regarded by later scholars as one of the Eight Great Prose Masters of the Tang and Song (唐宋八大家). Zeng Gong was born in Nanfeng, Jianchang (modern Fuzhou, Jiangxi). He is said to have written Liulun 六論 ("Six arguments") when he was only twelve. After the work was praised by Ouyang Xiu, one of the intellectual leaders of the era, Zeng Gong became widely known among literary circles. In 1037, at the age of eighteen, he moved to Yushan county (玉山縣, in modern Shangrao, Jiangxi) to accompany his father Zeng Yizhan (曾易占), who had been appointed magistrate there. Whilst in Yushan, he travelled extensively in its hinterlands and wrote You Xinzhou Yushan Xiaoyan Ji (遊信州玉山小岩記)
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Water Margin
Water Margin[1] is a Chinese novel attributed to Shi Nai'an. Considered one of the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature, the novel is written in vernacular Chinese rather than Classical Chinese.[2] The story, set in the Song dynasty, tells of how a group of 108 outlaws gather at Mount Liang (or Liangshan Marsh) to form a sizable army before they are eventually granted amnesty by the government and sent on campaigns to resist foreign invaders and suppress rebel forces
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