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Emily Smith (author)
Emily Smith is an English children's writer. Her books are aimed at young readers, mainly writing for Young Corgi Books (a Transworld Publishers imprint) and Orchard Books. Her first children's book, Astrid, the au pair from Outer Space won the Silver medal in the 6-8 age group, at the Nestlé Smarties Book Prize 1999. The Shrimp
The Shrimp
won the 6-8 age group Nestlé Smarties Book Prize Gold medal in 2000.Contents1 Published books 2 Awards 3 References 4 External linksPublished books[edit]The Good Manners Prize (HarperCollins Educational, 1996)[1]Stories contributed to original anthologies:"The Friendship Necklace", Incredibly Creepy Stories, ed. Tony Bradman (Corgi, Oct 1997), pp. 45–62[2] "Across Three Millennia", Sensational Cyber Stories, ed
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Children's Writer
Children's literature
Children's literature
or juvenile literature includes stories, books, magazines, and poems that are enjoyed by children. Modern children's literature is classified in two different ways: genre or the intended age of the reader. Children's literature
Children's literature
can be traced to stories and songs, part of a wider oral tradition, that adults shared with children before publishing existed. The development of early children's literature, before printing was invented, is difficult to trace. Even after printing became widespread, many classic "children's" tales were originally created for adults and later adapted for a younger audience. Since the 15th century, a large quantity of literature, often with a moral or religious message, has been aimed specifically at children
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Transworld Publishers
Transworld Publishers Inc. is a British publishing house in Ealing, London that is a division of New York firm Random House and belongs to German firm Bertelsmann, one of the world's largest mass media groups. It was established in 1950 as the British division of American company Bantam Books.[1] It publishes fiction and non fiction titles by various best-selling authors including Val Wood
Val Wood
under several different imprints
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Orchard Books
Grolier is one of the largest U.S. publishers of general encyclopedias, including The Book
Book
of Knowledge (1910), The New Book
Book
of Knowledge (1966), The New Book
Book
of Popular Science (1972), Encyclopedia Americana (1945), Academic American Encyclopedia (1980), and numerous incarnations of a CD-ROM
CD-ROM
encyclopedia (1986–2003). Grolier is an educational publishing company[1] known for its presence in school libraries
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Tony Bradman
Tony Bradman (born 22 January 1954) is an English writer of children's books and short speculative fiction best known for the Dilly the Dinosaur book series. He is the author of more than 50 books for young people published by multiple houses including Alfred A. Knopf, Methuen Publishing, Puffin Books, and HarperCollins. Bradman was born in Balham, London. He earned a M.A. degree from Queens' College, Cambridge, and worked as a music writer and as a children's book reviewer for Parents magazine before beginning to write children's literature in 1984
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Doubleday (publisher)
Doubleday is an American publishing company founded as Doubleday & McClure Company in 1897 that by 1947 was the largest in the United States. It published the work of mostly U.S. authors under a number of imprints and distributed them through its own stores. In 2009 Doubleday was merged with Knopf Publishing Group to form the Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, which is now part of Penguin Random House.Contents1 History 2 Presidents 3 Notable editors 4 Notable authors 5 Notable employees 6 Imprints 7 Bookstores 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The firm was founded as Doubleday & McClure Company in 1897 by Frank Nelson Doubleday,[1] who had formed a partnership with the magazine publisher Samuel McClure. One of their first bestsellers was The Day's Work by Rudyard Kipling. Other authors published by the company in its early years include W. Somerset Maugham
W. Somerset Maugham
and Joseph Conrad
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Andersen Press
Andersen Press is a British book publishing company. It was founded in 1976 by Klaus Flugge, and was named after Hans Christian Andersen. Random House has a holding in the company and has a strong association with Andersen.[1][2] The first book on the list was Goldilocks and the Three Bears by the then newly discovered Tony Ross, who wrote the popular children's series The Little Princess. The Andersen Press list now consists of over 1000 published titles, the majority of which are still in print. Andersen Press specialises in picture books and children’s fiction and the authors that it publishes include Melvin Burgess, Max Velthuijs, Ralph Steadman, Quentin Blake, Jeanne Willis and Emma Chichester Clark
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ISFDB
The Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB) is a database of bibliographic information on genres considered speculative fiction, including science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction.[2][3] The ISFDB is a volunteer effort, with both the database and wiki being open for editing and user contributions. The ISFDB database and code are available under Creative Commons licensing[4] and there is support within both and ISFDB for interlinking.[5] The data is reused by other organizations, such as Freebase, under the creative commons license.[6]Contents1 Purpose 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksPurpose[edit] The ISFDB database indexes authors, novels, short stories, publishers, awards, and magazines. Additionally, it supports author pseudonyms, series, awards, and cover art plus interior illustration credits which is combined into integrated author, artist, and publisher bibliographies
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Internet Speculative Fiction Database
The Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB) is a database of bibliographic information on genres considered speculative fiction, including science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction.[2][3] The ISFDB is a volunteer effort, with both the database and wiki being open for editing and user contributions. The ISFDB database and code are available under Creative Commons licensing[4] and there is support within both and ISFDB for interlinking.[5] The data is reused by other organizations, such as Freebase, under the creative commons license.[6]Contents1 Purpose 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksPurpose[edit] The ISFDB database indexes authors, novels, short stories, publishers, awards, and magazines. Additionally, it supports author pseudonyms, series, awards, and cover art plus interior illustration credits which is combined into integrated author, artist, and publisher bibliographies
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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National Diet Library
The National Diet
National Diet
Library (NDL) (国立国会図書館, Kokuritsu Kokkai Toshokan) is the national library of Japan
Japan
and among the largest libraries in the world. It was established in 1948 for the purpose of assisting members of the National Diet
National Diet
of Japan
Japan
(国会, Kokkai) in researching matters of public policy
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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The Shrimp
The Shrimp is a children's novel by Emily Smith. It won the 2001 Gold Award in 6–8 years category of the Nestlé Smarties Book Prize. It is a part of the Young Corgi series. Characters[edit]Ben Shrimpton: Ben is a shy boy who likes to collect shells. Because of his height and shyness, his friends like to call him "Shrimp". Colin: Colin is a spoiled boy in a rich family who likes to boast about how rich his family is. He doesn't like Ben and was the first person who started calling Ben "Shrimp".Children's literature portalThis article about a children's novel of the 2000s is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee guidelines for writing about novels
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Nestlé Smarties Book Prize
The Nestlé
Nestlé
Children's Book Prize, and Nestlé
Nestlé
Smarties
Smarties
Book Prize for a time, was a set of annual awards for British children's books that ran from 1985 to 2007. It was administered by Booktrust, an independent charity that promotes books and reading in the United Kingdom, and sponsored by Nestlé, the manufacturer of Smarties
Smarties
candy. It was one of the most respected and prestigious prizes for children's literature.[1][2][3] There were three award categories defined by audience ages 0 to 5 years, 6 to 8 years, and 9 to 11 years (introduced in 1987 after two years with no single prize).[1] Silver and bronze runners-up in each category were introduced in 1996 and designation of one overall winner was abandoned at the same time Eligible books were written by UK citizens and residents and published during the preceding year (not precisely the calendar year)
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Emily Smith (author)
Emily Smith is an English children's writer. Her books are aimed at young readers, mainly writing for Young Corgi Books (a Transworld Publishers imprint) and Orchard Books. Her first children's book, Astrid, the au pair from Outer Space won the Silver medal in the 6-8 age group, at the Nestlé Smarties Book Prize 1999. The Shrimp
The Shrimp
won the 6-8 age group Nestlé Smarties Book Prize Gold medal in 2000.Contents1 Published books 2 Awards 3 References 4 External linksPublished books[edit]The Good Manners Prize (HarperCollins Educational, 1996)[1]Stories contributed to original anthologies:"The Friendship Necklace", Incredibly Creepy Stories, ed. Tony Bradman (Corgi, Oct 1997), pp. 45–62[2] "Across Three Millennia", Sensational Cyber Stories, ed
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