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Email Disclaimer
An email disclaimer is a disclaimer, notice or warning which is added to an outgoing email and forms a distinct section which is separate from the main message.[1][2] The reasons for adding such a disclaimer include confidentiality, copyright, contract formation, defamation, discrimination, harassment, privilege and viruses.[3] The Economist
The Economist
reports that people have long stopped paying attention to disclaimers, claiming they are not legally enforceable.[4] In response to the Economist article, one attorney concluded that email disclaimers have been found to be relevant in numerous published
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Law Of Privilege
A privilege is a certain entitlement to immunity granted by the state or another authority to a restricted group, either by birth or on a conditional basis. Land-titles and taxi medallions are pronounced examples of transferable privilege. These can be revoked in certain circumstances. In modern democratic states, a privilege is conditional and granted only after birth. By contrast, a right is an inherent, irrevocable entitlement held by all citizens or all human beings from the moment of birth. Various examples of old common law privilege still exist, to title deeds, for example.[1] Etymologically, a privilege (privilegium) means a "private law", or rule relating to a specific individual or institution. Note that the principles of conduct that members of the legal profession observe in their practice are called Legal ethics
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Notice
Notice
Notice
is the legal concept describing a requirement that a party be aware of legal process affecting their rights, obligations or duties. There are several types of notice: public notice (or legal notice), actual notice, constructive notice, and implied notice.Contents1 Service of process 2 Due process issues (United States) 3 Notice
Notice
and knowledge 4 See also 5 Further readingService of process[edit] At common law, notice is the fundamental principle in service of process. In this case, the service of process puts the defendant "on notice" of the allegations contained within the complaint, or other such pleading. Since notice is fundamental, a court may rule a pleading defective if it does not put the defendant on notice. In a civil case, personal jurisdiction over a defendant is obtained by service of a summons
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The Economist
The Economist
Economist
is an English-language
English-language
weekly magazine-format newspaper owned by the Economist
Economist
Group and edited at offices in London.[2][6][7][8] Continuous publication began under its founder, James Wilson, in September 1843. In 2015 its average weekly circulation was a little over 1.5 million, about half of which were sold in the United States.[5][2]The publication belongs to the Economist
Economist
Group. It is 50% owned by the English branch of the Rothschild family
Rothschild family
and by the Agnelli family through its holding company Exor. The remaining 50% is held by private investors including the editors and staff.[9][10] The Rothschilds and the Agnellis are represented on the board of directors.[11] A board of trustees formally appoints the editor, who cannot be removed without its permission
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Patrick Hodge, Lord Hodge
Patrick Stewart Hodge, Lord Hodge QC (born 19 May 1953),[1] is a Scottish lawyer and Justice of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom.Contents1 Early life 2 Legal career 3 Personal life 4 See also 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Hodge was educated at Croftinloan School, an independent junior boarding school in Perthshire, and Trinity College, Glenalmond, also in Perthshire. He studied at Corpus Christi College, University of Cambridge (BA), and the School of Law of the University of Edinburgh (LL.B.), and worked as a civil servant at the Scottish Office
Scottish Office
between 1975 and 1978,[2] before being admitted to the Faculty of Advocates
Faculty of Advocates
in 1983.[3] Legal career[edit] Hodge was appointed Standing Junior Counsel to the Department of Energy from 1989 to 1991, and to the Inland Revenue
Inland Revenue
from 1991 to 1996, in which year he took silk
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S. G. Warburg & Co.
S. G. Warburg & Co. was a London-based investment bank. It was listed on the London
London
Stock Exchange and was once a constituent of the FTSE 100
FTSE 100
Index. The firm was acquired by the Swiss Bank
Bank
Corporation in 1995 and ultimately became a part of UBS.Contents1 History1.1 Founding and early history 1.2 The 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s 1.3 Swiss Bank
Bank
Corporation acquisition2 Notable current and former employees2.1 Business 2.2 Politics 2.3 Other3 See also 4 References 5 BibliographyHistory[edit] Founding and early history[edit] This bank was founded in 1946 by Siegmund Warburg
Siegmund Warburg
and Henry Grunfeld. Siegmund was a member of the Warburg family, a prominent German-Jewish banking family
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The Register
The Register
The Register
(nicknamed El Reg) is a British technology news and opinion website co-founded in 1994 by Mike Magee, John Lettice and Ross Alderson.[2] Situation Publishing Ltd is listed as the site's publisher. Drew Cullen is an owner, Linus Birtles the managing director and Andrew Orlowski
Andrew Orlowski
is the Executive Editor.Contents1 History 2 Readership and content 3 Intel
Intel
chips flaw investigation 4 Controversies 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Register
The Register
was founded in London
London
as an email newsletter called Chip Connection
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Outer House
The Outer House
Outer House
(abbreviated as CSOH in neutral citations) is one of the two parts of the Scottish Court
Court
of Session, which is the supreme civil court in Scotland. It is a court of first instance, although some statutory appeals are remitted to it by the other more senior part, the Inner House. Those appeals are made from the Sheriff court, the court of first instance for low value civil causes in the court system of Scotland. Judges in the Outer House
Outer House
are referred to as "Lord [name]" or "Lady [name]", or as Lord Ordinary. They are drawn from the Senators of the College of Justice
College of Justice
and they sit singly, sometimes with a jury of 12 in personal injury and defamation actions. Jurisdiction is extensive and extends to all kinds of civil claims unless expressly excluded by statute
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Email Forwarding
Email forwarding generically refers to the operation of re-sending an email message delivered to one email address to a possibly different email address(es). The term forwarding has no specific technical meaning,[1] but it implies that the email has been moved "forward" to a new destination. Email forwarding can also redirect mail going to a certain address and send it to one or more other addresses
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Computer Virus
A computer virus is a type of malicious software program ("malware") that, when executed, replicates itself by modifying other computer programs and inserting its own code.[1] When this replication succeeds, the affected areas are then said to be "infected" with a computer virus.[2][3][4] Virus writers use social engineering deceptions and exploit detailed knowledge of security vulnerabilities to initially infect systems and to spread the virus
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Harassment
Harassment
Harassment
covers a wide range of behaviors of an offensive nature. It is commonly understood as behavior that disturbs or upsets, and it is characteristically repetitive. In the legal sense, it is behavior that appears to be disturbing or threatening
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Discrimination
In human social affairs, discrimination is treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person based on the group, class, or category to which the person is perceived to belong rather than on individual attributes
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Defamation
Defamation, calumny, vilification, or traducement is the communication of a false statement that harms the reputation of an individual person, business, product, group, government, religion, or nation.[1] Under common law, to constitute defamation, a claim must generally be false and must have been made to someone other than the person defamed.[2] Some common law jurisdictions also distinguish between spoken defamation, called slander, and defamation in other media such as printed words or images, called libel.[3] False light laws protect against statements which are not technically false, but which are misleading.[4] In some civil law jurisdictions, defamation is treated as a crime rather than a civil wrong.[5] The
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Implied-in-fact Contract
An implied-in-fact contract is a form of an implied contract formed by non-verbal conduct, rather than by explicit words. The United States Supreme Court has defined it as "an agreement 'implied in fact'" as "founded upon a meeting of minds, which, although not embodied in an express contract, is inferred, as a fact, from conduct of the parties showing, in the light of the surrounding circumstances, their tacit understanding."[1] Although the parties may not have exchanged words of agreement, their conduct may indicate that an agreement existed. For example, if a patient goes to a doctor's appointment, his actions indicate he intends to receive treatment in exchange for paying reasonable/fair doctor's fees. Likewise, by seeing the patient, the doctor's actions indicate he intends to treat the patient in exchange for payment of the bill. Therefore, it seems that a contract actually existed between the doctor and the patient, even though nobody spoke any words of agreement
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Copyright
Copyright
Copyright
is a legal right created by the law of a country that grants the creator of an original work exclusive rights for its use and distribution. This is usually only for a limited time. The exclusive rights are not absolute but limited by limitations and exceptions to copyright law, including fair use. A major limitation on copyright is that copyright protects only the original expression of ideas, and not the underlying ideas themselves.[1][2] Copyright
Copyright
is a form of intellectual property, applicable to certain forms of creative work. Some, but not all jurisdictions require "fixing" copyrighted works in a tangible form
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