HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ellis Peters
Edith Mary Pargeter, OBE, BEM (28 September 1913 – 14 October 1995), also known by her nom de plume Ellis Peters, was an English author of works in many categories, especially history and historical fiction, and was also honoured for her translations of Czech classics; she is probably best known for her murder mysteries, both historical and modern. She is well known for her medieval-detective series The Cadfael
Cadfael
Chronicles.Contents1 Personal 2 Writing career 3 Death 4 Recognition 5 Bibliography5.1 As Edith Pargeter5.1.1 The Heaven Tree Trilogy 5.1.2 The Brothers of Gwynedd Quartet 5.1.3 Jim Benison a.k.a
[...More...]

"Ellis Peters" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

A Morbid Taste For Bones
A disease is a particular abnormal condition that affects part or all of an organism not caused by external force[1][2] (see 'injury') and that consists of a disorder of a structure or function, usually serving as an evolutionary disadvantage. The study of disease is called pathology, which includes the study of cause. Disease
Disease
is often construed as a medical condition associated with specific symptoms and signs.[3] It may be caused by external factors such as pathogens or by internal dysfunctions, particularly of the immune system, such as an immunodeficiency, or by a hypersensitivity, including allergies and autoimmunity. When caused by pathogens (e.g. malaria by Plasmodium ssp.), the term disease is often misleadingly used even in the scientific literature in place of its causal agent, the pathogen
[...More...]

"A Morbid Taste For Bones" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Women's Royal Naval Service
The Women's Royal Naval Service
Women's Royal Naval Service
(WRNS; popularly and officially known as the Wrens) was the women's branch of the United Kingdom's Royal Navy. First formed in 1917 for the First World War, it was disbanded in 1919, then revived in 1939 at the beginning of the Second World War, remaining active until integrated into the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
in 1993. WRNs included cooks, clerks, wireless telegraphists, radar plotters, weapons analysts, range assessors, electricians and air mechanics.Contents1 History 2 Ranks and uniform 3 List of Directors 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] The Wrens were formed in 1917 during the First World War. On 10 October 1918, nineteen-year-old Josephine Carr from Cork, became the first Wren to die on active service, when her ship, the RMS Leinster was torpedoed. By the end of the war the WRNS had 5,500 members, 500 of them officers
[...More...]

"Women's Royal Naval Service" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John I Of England
John (24 December 1166 – 19 October 1216), also known as John Lackland (Norman French: Johan sanz Terre),[1] was King of England from 6 April 1199 until his death in 1216. John lost the Duchy of Normandy
Normandy
to King Philip II of France, resulting in the collapse of most of the Angevin Empire
Angevin Empire
and contributing to the subsequent growth in power of the Capetian dynasty
Capetian dynasty
during the 13th century. The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom. John, the youngest of five sons of King Henry II of England
Henry II of England
and Duchess Eleanor of Aquitaine, was at first not expected to inherit significant lands
[...More...]

"John I Of England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Arthur I, Duke Of Brittany
Arthur I (Breton: Arzhur Iañ; French: Arthur Ier de Bretagne) (29 March 1187 – probably 1203) was 4th Earl of Richmond
Earl of Richmond
and Duke of Brittany between 1196 and 1203. He was the posthumous son of Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany
Duke of Brittany
and Constance, Duchess of Brittany. Geoffrey was a son of Henry II, King of England, younger than Richard the Lionheart but older than John Lackland. In 1190 Arthur was designated heir to the throne of England and its French territory by his uncle, Richard I,[1] the intent being that Arthur would succeed Richard in preference to Richard's younger brother John
[...More...]

"Arthur I, Duke Of Brittany" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kent
Kent
Kent
/kɛnt/ is a county in South East England
England
and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London
Greater London
to the north west, Surrey
Surrey
to the west and East Sussex
East Sussex
to the south west. The county also shares borders with Essex
Essex
along the estuary of the River Thames, and with the French department of Pas-de-Calais
Pas-de-Calais
along the English Channel
[...More...]

"Kent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hubert De Burgh
A burgh /ˈbʌrə/ was an autonomous municipal corporation in Scotland and Northern England, usually a town, or toun in Scots. This type of administrative division existed from the 12th century, when King David I created the first royal burghs. Burgh
Burgh
status was broadly analogous to borough status, found in the rest of the United Kingdom. Following local government reorganization in 1975 the title of "royal burgh" remains in use in many towns, but now has little more than ceremonial value.Contents1 History1.1 Types 1.2 Modern history2 Features2.1 Provost 2.2 Bailies 2.3 Burgesses 2.4 Dean of Guild 2.5 Trading privileges3 Etymology 4 Linguistics4.1 England 4.2 Scotland 4.3 Other5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] The first burgh was Berwick. By 1130, David I (r
[...More...]

"Hubert De Burgh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Margaret De Burgh
Hubert de Burgh, 1st Earl of Kent (c. 1170 – before 5 May 1243) was Justiciar of England and Ireland and one of the most influential men in England during the reigns of King John (1199–1216) and of his infant son and successor King Henry III (1216–1272).Contents1 Origins 2 Appointments by King John 3 Chief Justiciar 4 Regent to Henry III 5 Trouble with the King 6 Lands acquired 7 Marriages 8 Death 9 Fictional portrayals 10 References 11 BibliographyOrigins[edit] De Burgh's family were minor landholders in Norfolk and Suffolk, from whom he inherited at least four manors.[1] His mother was named Alice, and his father may have been named Walter.[1] He was the younger brother of William de Burgh (d. 1206),[2] the founder of the de Burgh/Burke/Bourke dynasty in Ireland
[...More...]

"Margaret De Burgh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Llewelyn The Last
Llywelyn ap Gruffudd
Llywelyn ap Gruffudd
(c. 1223 – 11 December 1282), sometimes written as Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, also known as Llywelyn the Last, or, in Welsh, Llywelyn Ein Llyw Olaf ("Llywelyn, Our Last Leader"), was Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
(Latin: Princeps Wallie; Welsh: Tywysog Cymru) from 1258 until his death at Cilmeri
Cilmeri
in 1282
[...More...]

"Llewelyn The Last" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mystery Writers Of America
Mystery Writers of America (MWA) is an organization of mystery and crime writers, based in New York City.[1] The organization was founded in 1945 by Clayton Rawson, Anthony Boucher, Lawrence Treat, and Brett Halliday. It presents the Edgar Award, a small bust of Edgar Allan Poe, to mystery or crime writers every year. It presents the Raven Award to non-writers, who contribute to the mystery genre. The category of Best Juvenile Mystery is also part of the Edgar Award, with such notable recipients as Barbara Brooks Wallace
Barbara Brooks Wallace
having won the honor twice, for The Twin in the Tavern in 1994 and Sparrows in the Scullery in 1998, and Tony Abbott for his novel The Postcard, which received critical accolades in 2009.Contents1 Grand Master Award 2 Raven Award 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksGrand Master Award[edit] The Grand Master Award is the highest honor bestowed by the Mystery Writers of America
[...More...]

"Mystery Writers Of America" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shropshire
Shropshire
Shropshire
(/ˈʃrɒpʃər/ SHROP-shər or /ˈʃrɒpʃɪər/ SHROP-sheer; alternatively Salop;[citation needed] abbreviated, in print only, Shrops; demonym Salopian /səˈloʊpiən/ sə-LOH-pee-ən)[3] is a county in the West Midlands of England, bordering Wales
Wales
to the west, Cheshire
Cheshire
to the north, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
to the east, and Worcestershire
Worcestershire
and Herefordshire
Herefordshire
to the south. Shropshire Council
Shropshire Council
was created in 2009, a unitary authority taking over from the previous county council and five district councils
[...More...]

"Shropshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Pilgrim Of Hate
A pilgrim (from the Latin
Latin
peregrinus) is a traveler (literally one who has come from afar) who is on a journey to a holy place. Typically, this is a physical journey (often on foot) to some place of special significance to the adherent of a particular religious belief system. In the spiritual literature of Christianity, the concept of pilgrim and pilgrimage may refer to the experience of life in the world (considered as a period of exile) or to the inner path of the spiritual aspirant from a state of wretchedness to a state of beatitude.Contents1 History 2 Modern era 3 Notable pilgrims 4 In culture 5 See also 6 References 7 Literature 8 External linksHistory[edit] Pilgrims and the making of pilgrimages are common in many religions, including the faiths of ancient Egypt, Persia
Persia
in the Mithraic period, India, China, and Japan
[...More...]

"The Pilgrim Of Hate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Birmingham University
The University                                       College scarvesCollege of Arts and Law                             College of Social Sciences                               College of Life and Environmental Sciences                         College of Engineering and Physical Sciences                   College of Medical and Dental Sciences                                 Affiliations Universitas 21 Universities UK EUA ACU Sutton 13 Russell Group<
[...More...]

"Birmingham University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakia, or Czecho-Slovakia[1] (/ˌtʃɛkoʊsloʊˈvækiə, -kə-, -slə-, -ˈvɑː-/;[2][3] Czech and Slovak: Československo, Česko-Slovensko[4][5]), was a sovereign state in Central Europe that existed from October 1918, when it declared its independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until its peaceful dissolution into the Czech Republic and Slovakia
Slovakia
on 1 January 1993. From 1939 to 1945, following its forced division and partial incorporation into Nazi Germany, the state did not de facto exist but its government-in-exile continued to operate. From 1948 to 1990, Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakia
was part of the Soviet bloc with a command economy. Its economic status was formalized in membership of Comecon
Comecon
from 1949 and its defense status in the Warsaw Pact
Warsaw Pact
of May 1955
[...More...]

"Czechoslovakia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

New Year Honours
The New Year Honours
New Year Honours
is a part of the British honours system, with New Year's Day, 1 January, being marked by naming new members of orders of chivalry and recipients of other official honours. A number of other Commonwealth realms also mark this day in this way. The awards are presented by or in the name of the reigning monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II
Elizabeth II
or her vice-regal representative. British honours are published in supplements to the London Gazette. Honours have been awarded at New Year since at least 1890, in which year a list of Queen Victoria's awards was published by the London Gazette on 2 January.[1] There was no honours list at New Year 1902, as a list had been published on the new King's birthday the previous November,[2] but in January 1903 a list was again published, though including only Indian orders until 1909 (while the other orders were announced on the King's birthday in November)
[...More...]

"New Year Honours" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Petty Officer
A petty officer (PO) is a non-commissioned officer in many navies and is given the NATO
NATO
rank denotion OR-6. In many nations, they are typically equal to a corporal or sergeant in comparison to other military branches. Often they may be superior to a seaman, generally the (or one of the) lowest ranks in a navy, and subordinate to a more senior non-commissioned officer, such as a chief petty officer.Contents1 Origin 2 Usage in Navies2.1 Canada 2.2 India 2.3 United Kingdom 2.4 United States 2.5 Non English-speaking countries3 See also 4 ReferencesOrigin[edit] The modern petty officer dates back to the Age of Sail. Petty officers rank between naval officers (both commissioned and warrant) and most enlisted sailors. These were men with some claim to officer rank, sufficient to distinguish them from ordinary ratings, without raising them so high as the sea officers
[...More...]

"Petty Officer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.