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Elizabeth Robins
Elizabeth Robins
Elizabeth Robins
(August 6, 1862 – May 8, 1952) was an actress, playwright, novelist, and suffragette. She also wrote as C. E. Raimond.Contents1 Early life 2 Acting career 3 Writing career 4 Women's rights involvement 5 Personal life 6 Works 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Elizabeth Robins, the first child of Charles Robins and Hannah Crow, was born in Louisville, Kentucky.[1] After financial difficulties, her father left for Colorado, leaving the children in the care of Hannah.[2] When Hannah was committed to an insane asylum, Elizabeth and the other children were sent to live with her grandmother in Zanesville, Ohio, where she was educated. It would be her grandmother who armed her with The Complete Works of William Shakespeare and her unconditional support on her endeavor to act in New York City
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Internet Archive
Coordinates: 37°46′56″N 122°28′18″W / 37.7823°N 122.4716°W / 37.7823; -122.4716Internet ArchiveType of business 501(c)(3) nonprofitType of siteDigital libraryAvailable in EnglishFounded May 12, 1996; 21 years ago (1996-05-12)[1][2]Headquarters Richmond District San Francisco, California, U.S.Chairman Brewster KahleServices Archive-It, Open Library, Wayback Machine
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Typhoid Fever
Typhoid fever, also known simply as typhoid, is a bacterial infection due to Salmonella typhi
Salmonella typhi
that causes symptoms.[3] Symptoms may vary from mild to severe and usually begin six to thirty days after exposure.[1][2] Often there is a gradual onset of a high fever over several days.[1] Weakness, abdominal pain, constipation, and headaches also commonly occur.[2][6]
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National Union Of Women's Suffrage Societies
The National Union of Women's Suffrage
Suffrage
Societies (NUWSS), also known as the Suffragists (not to be confused with the suffragettes) was an organisation of women's suffrage societies in the United Kingdom.Contents1 Formation and campaigning 2 Political bias 3 NUWSS during World War I 4 Activities after World War I 5 Archives 6 See also 7 Notable members of NUWSS 8 References 9 Further readingFormation and campaigning[edit]Millicent FawcettThe group was founded in 1897 by the merger of the National Central Society for Women's
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Louisville, Kentucky
Louisville (/ˈluːəvəl/ ( listen) LOO-ə-vəl, /ˈlʊvəl/ ( listen) LUUV-əl or /ˈluːiːvɪl/ ( listen)) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Kentucky
Kentucky
and the 29th-most populous city in the United States.[d][5] It is one of two cities in Kentucky
Kentucky
designated as first-class, the other being the state's second-largest city of Lexington.[e] Louisville is the historical seat and, since 2003, the nominal seat of Jefferson County. Louisville was founded in 1778 by George Rogers Clark
George Rogers Clark
and is named after King Louis XVI of France, making Louisville one of the oldest cities west of the Appalachian Mountains. Sited beside the Falls of the Ohio, the only major obstruction to river traffic between the upper Ohio River
Ohio River
and the Gulf of Mexico, the settlement first grew as a portage site
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House Of Lords
The House of Lords
House of Lords
of the United Kingdom, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster.[2] Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual
Lords Spiritual
and Temporal of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in Parliament assembled. Unlike the elected House of Commons, all members of the House of Lords (excluding 90 hereditary peers elected among themselves and two peers who are ex officio members) are appointed.[3] The membership of the House of Lords
House of Lords
is drawn from the peerage and is made up of Lords Spiritual and Lords Temporal
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Margaret Mackworth, 2nd Viscountess Rhondda
Margaret Haig Mackworth, 2nd Viscountess Rhondda (12 June 1883 – 20 July 1958) was a Welsh peeress, businesswoman, and active suffragette. She was significant in the history of women's suffrage in the United Kingdom.Contents1 Biography 2 Personal life 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingBiography[edit] Margaret Haig Thomas was born on 12 June 1883 in London. Her parents were David Alfred Thomas, first Viscount Rhondda, and Sybil Haig, also a suffragette. In her autobiography, Margaret wrote that her mother had 'prayed passionately that her baby daughter might become feminist'. And indeed she did become a passionate activist for women's rights. She was an only child, and although she was born in London, she lived in Llanwern, near Newport, until the age of 13 when she went away to boarding school, first to Notting Hill High School then St Leonards School in St Andrews. In 1904, aged 19, she took up a place at Somerville College, Oxford, where she studied history
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Viscount Rhondda
Viscount Rhondda, of Llanwern in the County of Monmouth, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1918 for the Welsh businessman and Liberal politician David Alfred Thomas, 1st Baron Rhondda, with special remainder to his daughter Margaret and her heirs male. Thomas had already been created Baron Rhondda, of Llanwern in the County of Monmouth, in 1916, with normal remainder to the heirs male of his body. The barony became extinct on his death in 1918, whereas he was succeeded in the viscountcy according to the special remainder by his daughter Margaret. She was a well-known suffragette. On her death in 1958 this title became extinct as well. Viscounts Rhondda (1918)[edit]David Alfred Thomas, 1st Viscount Rhondda (1856–1918) Margaret Haig Mackworth, 2nd Viscountess Rhondda (1883–1958)References[edit]Burke's Peerage Lord Birkenhead: F. E
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Frederick Pethick-Lawrence, 1st Baron Pethick-Lawrence
Frederick William Pethick-Lawrence, 1st Baron Pethick-Lawrence PC (28 December 1871 – 10 September 1961) was a British Labour politician.Contents1 Background and education 2 Political career 3 Personal life 4 References 5 External linksBackground and education[edit] Born Frederick Lawrence in London, he was the son of wealthy Unitarians who were members of the Liberal Party. Three of his father's brothers, William, James, and Edwin, were politically active in various roles, including as Lord Mayor of London and as members of parliament. Frederick was educated at Wixenford,[1] Eton, and Trinity College, Cambridge,[2] where he was a member of Cambridge University Liberal Club.[3] He then became a barrister. Political career[edit]Lord Pethick-Lawrence with Gandhi in 1946Lawrence met and fell in love with Emmeline Pethick, an active socialist and campaigner for women's votes. They finally married in 1901 after Lawrence converted to socialism
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Suffragist
Women's suffrage
Women's suffrage
(colloquial: female suffrage, woman suffrage or women's right to vote) is the right of women to vote in elections; a person who advocates the extension of suffrage, particularly to women, is called a suffragist.[1] Limited voting rights were gained by women in Finland, Iceland, Sweden
Sweden
and some Australian colonies and western U.S. states in the late 19th century.[2] National and international organizations formed to coordinate efforts to gain voting rights, especially the International Woman
Woman
Suffrage
Suffrage
Alliance (founded in 1904, Berlin, Germany), and also worked for equal civil rights for women.[3] In 1881, the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
gave women who owned property the right to vote
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John Masefield
John Edward Masefield, OM (/ˈmeɪsˌfiːld, ˈmeɪz-/; 1 June 1878 – 12 May 1967) English poet and writer, was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1930. Among his best known works are the children's novels The Midnight Folk and The Box of Delights, and the poems "The Everlasting Mercy" and "Sea-Fever".Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 World War I to appointment as Poet Laureate 1.3 Poetry associations 1.4 Later years and death2 Art song
Art song
settings 3 Selected works3.1 Poetry collections 3.2 Novels 3.3 Plays 3.4 Non-fiction and autobiographical4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Masefield was born in Ledbury
Ledbury
in Herefordshire, to Caroline and George Masefield, a solicitor. His mother died giving birth to his sister when Masefield was only six, and he went to live with his aunt
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Virginia Woolf
Adeline Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
(/wʊlf/;[3] née Stephen; 25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) was an English writer who is considered one of the most important modernist twentieth century authors and a pioneer in the use of stream of consciousness as a narrative device. She was born in an affluent household in South Kensington, London, attended the Ladies' Department of King's College and was acquainted with the early reformers of women's higher education. Having been home-schooled for the most part of her childhood, mostly in English classics and Victorian literature, Woolf began writing professionally in 1900. During the interwar period, Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
was an important part of London's literary society as well as a central figure in the group of intellectuals known as the Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
Group
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Stephen Phillips
Stephen Phillips
Stephen Phillips
(28 July 1864 – 9 December 1915) was an English poet and dramatist, who enjoyed considerable popularity early in his career.Contents1 Biography 2 References 3 Sources 4 External linksBiography[edit] He was born at Somertown near Oxford, the son of the Rev. Stephen Phillips, precentor of Peterborough Cathedral. He was educated at Stratford and Peterborough Grammar Schools, and considered entering Queens' College, Cambridge
Queens' College, Cambridge
on a minor scholarship to study classics; but he instead went to a London crammer to prepare for the civil service.[1] In 1885, however, he moved to Wolverhampton to join his cousin F. R
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Leonard Woolf
Leonard Sidney Woolf (/ˈwʊlf/; 25 November 1880 – 14 August 1969) was a British political theorist, author, publisher and civil servant, and husband of author Virginia Woolf.Contents1 Early life 2 Writing 3 Family 4 Death 5 Works 6 Autobiographical works 7 Biographical works on Woolf 8 Related works and cultural references 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksEarly life[edit]Virginia and Leonard Woolf, 1912Woolf was born in London, the third of ten children of Solomon Rees Sidney Woolf (known as Sidney Woolf), a barrister and Queen's Counsel, and Marie (née de Jongh). His family was Jewish. After his father died in 1892 Woolf was sent to board at Arlington House School near Brighton, Sussex. From 1894 to 1899 he attended St Paul's School, and in 1899 he won a classical scholarship to Trinity College, Cambridge,[1] where he was elected to the Cambridge Apostles. Other members included Lytton Strachey, John Maynard Keynes, G. E. Moore
G. E

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William Wilberforce
William Wilberforce
William Wilberforce
(24 August 1759 – 29 July 1833) was an English politician, philanthropist, and a leader of the movement to stop the slave trade. A native of Kingston upon Hull, Yorkshire, he began his political career in 1780, eventually becoming an independent Member of Parliament for Yorkshire
Yorkshire
(1784–1812). In 1785, he became an evangelical Christian, which resulted in major changes to his lifestyle and a lifelong concern for reform. In 1787, he came into contact with Thomas Clarkson
Thomas Clarkson
and a group of anti-slave-trade activists, including Granville Sharp, Hannah More
Hannah More
and Charles Middleton. They persuaded Wilberforce to take on the cause of abolition, and he soon became one of the leading English abolitionists
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History Of Feminism
The history of feminism is the chronological narrative of the movements and ideologies aimed at equal rights for women. While feminists around the world have differed in causes, goals, and intentions depending on time, culture, and country, most Western feminist historians assert that all movements that work to obtain women's rights should be considered feminist movements, even when they did not (or do not) apply the term to themselves.[1][2][3][4][5] Other historians limit the term to the modern feminist movement and its progeny, and instead use the label "protofeminist" to describe earlier movements.[6] Modern Western feminist history is split into three time periods, or "waves", each with slightly different aims based on prior progress.[7][8] First-wave feminism
First-wave feminism
of the 19th and early 20th centuries focuses on overturning legal inequalities, particularly women's suffrage
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