HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Elisha Gray
Elisha Gray
Elisha Gray
(August 2, 1835 – January 21, 1901) was an American electrical engineer who co-founded the Western Electric
Western Electric
Manufacturing Company. Gray is best known for his development of a telephone prototype in 1876 in Highland Park, Illinois. Some recent authors have argued that Gray should be considered the true inventor of the telephone because Alexander Graham Bell
Alexander Graham Bell
allegedly stole the idea of the liquid transmitter from him,[1] although Bell had been using liquid transmitters in his telephone experiments for more than two years previously
[...More...]

"Elisha Gray" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
[...More...]

"Wayback Machine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

American Elsevier
Elsevier
Elsevier
(Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɛlzəviːr]) is an information and analytics company and one of the world's major providers of scientific, technical, and medical information. It was established in 1880 as a publishing company.[1][2] It is a part of the RELX Group,[3] known until 2015 as Reed Elsevier. Its products include journals such as The Lancet
The Lancet
and Cell, the ScienceDirect
ScienceDirect
collection of electronic journals, the Trends and Current Opinion series of journals, the online citation database Scopus, and the ClinicalKey solution for clinicians
[...More...]

"American Elsevier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States Patent Office
The United States
United States
Patent
Patent
and Trademark
Trademark
Office (USPTO) is an agency in the U.S. Department of Commerce that issues patents to inventors and businesses for their inventions, and trademark registration for product and intellectual property identification. The USPTO
USPTO
is "unique among federal agencies because it operates solely on fees collected by its users, and not on taxpayer dollars".[2] Its "operating structure is like a business in that it receives requests for services—applications for patents and trademark registrations—and charges fees projected to cover the cost of performing the services [it] provide[s]".[2][3] The USPTO
USPTO
is based in Alexandria, Virginia, after a 2005 move from the Crystal City area of neighboring Arlington, Virginia
[...More...]

"United States Patent Office" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Affidavit
An affidavit (/ˌæfɪˈdeɪvɪt/ AF-i-DAY-vit) is a written sworn statement of fact voluntarily made by an affiant or deponent under an oath or affirmation administered by a person authorized to do so by law. Such statement is witnessed as to the authenticity of the affiant's signature by a taker of oaths, such as a notary public or commissioner of oaths. The name is Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
for he/she has declared upon oath. An affidavit is a type of verified statement or showing, or in other words, it contains a verification, meaning it is under oath or penalty of perjury, and this serves as evidence to its veracity and is required for court proceedings. Affidavits may be written in the first or third person, depending on who drafted the document
[...More...]

"Affidavit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Augustus Garland
Augustus Hill Garland
Augustus Hill Garland
(June 11, 1832  – January 26, 1899) was an American politician who served as the 38th Attorney General of the United States
United States
from 1885 to 1889. A Democrat from Arkansas, he served in the Confederate States Senate, the United States
United States
Senate, and as the 11th Governor of Arkansas
Arkansas
from 1874 to 1877.Contents1 Early life and law career 2 Entry into politics 3 American Civil War3.1 Confederate States Congress4 Ex parte Garland 5 Post-war political career5.1 Governor of Arkansas 5.2 United States
United States
Senate 5.3 Attorney General of the United States6 Later life and death 7 Legacy 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksEarly life and law career[edit] Garland was born in Covington, Tennessee, on June 11, 1832, to Rufus and Barbara (Hill) Garland
[...More...]

"Augustus Garland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Xerox
Xerox
Xerox
Corporation /ˈzɪərɒks/ (also known as Xerox, stylized as xerox since 2008, and previously as XEROX from 1960 to 2008) is an American global corporation that sells print and digital document solutions, and document technology products in more than 160 countries.[3] Xerox
Xerox
is headquartered in Norwalk, Connecticut
Norwalk, Connecticut
(having moved from Stamford, Connecticut
Connecticut
in October 2007),[4] though its largest population of employees is based around Rochester, New York, the area in which the company was founded
[...More...]

"Xerox" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

1893 Columbian Exposition
The World's Columbian Exposition
World's Columbian Exposition
(the official shortened name for the World's Fair: Columbian Exposition,[1] also known as the Chicago World's Fair and Chicago
Chicago
Columbian Exposition) was a world's fair held in Chicago
Chicago
in 1893
1893
to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus's arrival in the New World
New World
in 1492.[2] The centerpiece of the Fair, the large water pool, represented the long voyage Columbus took to the New World. Chicago
Chicago
bested New York City; Washington, D.C.; and St. Louis
St. Louis
for the honor of hosting the fair
[...More...]

"1893 Columbian Exposition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Closed-circuit Television
Closed-circuit television
Closed-circuit television
(CCTV), also known as video surveillance,[1][2] is the use of video cameras to transmit a signal to a specific place, on a limited set of monitors. It differs from broadcast television in that the signal is not openly transmitted, though it may employ point to point (P2P), point to multipoint (P2MP), or mesh wired or wireless links. Though almost all video cameras fit this definition, the term is most often applied to those used for surveillance in areas that may need monitoring such as banks, stores, and other areas where security is needed. Though Videotelephony
Videotelephony
is seldom called "CCTV" one exception is the use of video in distance education, where it is an important tool.[3][4] Surveillance
Surveillance
of the public using CCTV is common in many areas around the world
[...More...]

"Closed-circuit Television" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Frank Gray (researcher)
Frank Gray (13 September 1887, Alpine, Indiana
Alpine, Indiana
– 23 May 1969) was a physicist and researcher at Bell Labs
Bell Labs
who made numerous innovations in television, both mechanical and electronic, and is remembered for the Gray code. The Gray code, or reflected binary code (RBC), appearing in Gray's 1953 patent,[1] is a binary numeral system often used in electronics, but with many applications in mathematics. Gray conducted pioneering research on the development of television; he proposed an early form of "flying spot scanner" for early TV systems in 1927,[2][3] and helped develop a two-way mechanically scanned TV system in 1930.[4] With Pierre Mertz, Gray wrote the classic paper on the mathematics of raster scan systems in 1934.[5] He later participated in the early days of the digital revolution, with Raymond W
[...More...]

"Frank Gray (researcher)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

First To Invent
First to file (FTF) and first to invent (FTI) are legal concepts that define who has the right to the grant of a patent for an invention. The first-to-file system is used in all countries,[1] including the United States, which switched to a first-inventor-to-file (FITF) system on March 16, 2013 after the enactment of the America Invents Act.[2] There is an important difference between the strict nature of the FTF under the European Patent
Patent
Office (EPO) and the FITF system of the United States Patent
Patent
and Trademark Office (USPTO)
[...More...]

"First To Invent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anthony William Fairbank Edwards
Anthony William Fairbank Edwards, FRS[2] (born 1935) is a British statistician, geneticist, and evolutionary biologist. He was the son of the surgeon Harold C. Edwards, and brother of the medical geneticist John H. Edwards. He has sometimes been called "Fisher's Edwards"[citation needed] to distinguish him from his brother, because he was mentored by Ronald Fisher. Contents1 Career and research1.1 Books 1.2 Selected papers2 Awards and honours 3 Personal life 4 ReferencesCareer and research[edit]6-set Edwards–Venn diagramEdwards is a Life Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge[3] and retired Professor of Biometry at the University of Cambridge, and holds both the ScD and LittD degrees. He has written several books and numerous scientific papers.[4] He is best known for his pioneering work, with L.L
[...More...]

"Anthony William Fairbank Edwards" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Johns Hopkins University Press
The Johns Hopkins University
Johns Hopkins University
Press (also referred to as JHU Press or JHUP) is the publishing division of Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins
University. It was founded in 1878 and is the oldest continuously running university press in the United States.[2] The Press publishes books, journals, and electronic databases. Considering all its units (books, journals, fulfillment, and electronic resources) it is a contender for America's largest university press. Its headquarters are in Charles Village, Baltimore.Contents1 Overview 2 Publications and divisions 3 References 4 External linksOverview[edit] Daniel Coit Gilman, the first president of the Johns Hopkins University, inaugurated the Press in 1878.[3] The Press began as the University's Publication Agency, publishing the American Journal of Mathematics in its first year and the American Chemical Journal in its second
[...More...]

"Johns Hopkins University Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Donald Ervin Knuth
Donald Ervin Knuth (/kəˈnuːθ/[4] kə-NOOTH; born January 10, 1938) is an American computer scientist, mathematician, and professor emeritus at Stanford University. He is the author of the multi-volume work The Art of Computer Programming. He contributed to the development of the rigorous analysis of the computational complexity of algorithms and systematized formal mathematical techniques for it. In the process he also popularized the asymptotic notation
[...More...]

"Donald Ervin Knuth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.