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Elevator
An elevator (US and Canada) or lift (UK, Australia,[1][2][3] Ireland,[4][5] New Zealand,[6][7] and South Africa, Nigeria
Nigeria
[8]) is a type of vertical transportation that moves people or goods between floors (levels, decks) of a building, vessel, or other structure. Elevators are generally powered by electric motors that either drive traction cables and counterweight systems like a hoist, or pump hydraulic fluid to raise a cylindrical piston like a jack. In agriculture and manufacturing, an elevator is any type of conveyor device used to lift materials in a continuous stream into bins or silos. Several types exist, such as the chain and bucket elevator, grain auger screw conveyor using the principle of Archimedes' screw, or the chain and paddles or forks of hay elevators
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Al-Muradi
Alī Ibn Khalaf al-Murādī, (11th century) was an Andalusi mathematician and astronomer who belonged to the scientific circle of Ṣāʿid al- Andalusī.[1] He was the author of the technological manuscript entitled Kitāb al-asrār fī natā'ij al-afkār (The Book of Secrets in the Results of Thoughts or The Book of Secrets in the Results of Ideas).[2] It was copied and used at the court of Alfonso VI of León and Castile
Alfonso VI of León and Castile
in Christian Spain in the 11th century.[citation needed] The manuscript provides information abo
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Arkhangelskoye Palace
Arkhangelskoye (Russian: Арха́нгельское) is a historical estate in Krasnogorsky District, Moscow
Moscow
Oblast, Russia, located around 20 km to the west of Moscow
Moscow
and 2 km southwest of Krasnogorsk.Contents1 History 2 Arkhangelskoye today 3 Image gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]The unfinished "Colonnade" mausoleumFrom 1703 to 1810, Arkhangelskoye belonged to the Golitsyns. In 1810, Prince Nikolai Yusupov bought the estate, which stayed in the Yusupov family until the Russian Revolution. In 1917, the Yusupovs' property was nationalized by the Bolsheviks. Today, Arkhangelskoye is a state museum. The estate is built in a neoclassical style by Jacob Guerne, with the prominent palace facing the Moscow
Moscow
river and a regular terraced park decorated with many antique statues
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Hemp
Hemp, or industrial hemp (from Old English
Old English
hænep),[1] typically found in the northern hemisphere, is a variety of the Cannabis
Cannabis
sativa pla
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Al-Andalus
Al-Andalus
Al-Andalus
(Arabic: الأنْدَلُس‎, trans. al-ʼAndalus; Spanish: al-Ándalus; Portuguese: al-Ândalus; Catalan: al-Àndalus; Berber: Andalus), also known as Muslim Spain, Muslim Iberia, or Islamic Iberia, was a medieval Muslim territory and cultural domain occupying at its peak most of what are today Spain and Portugal. At its greatest geographical extent in the 8th century, a part of southern France—Septimania—was briefly under its control
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Louis XV Of France
Louis XV (15 February 1710 – 10 May 1774), known as Louis the Beloved,[1] was a monarch of the House of Bourbon
House of Bourbon
who ruled as King of France
France
from 1 September 1715 until his death in 1774. He succeeded his great-grandfather Louis XIV
Louis XIV
at the age of five. Until he reached maturity in 1723, his kingdom was ruled by Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, as Regent of France. Cardinal Fleury was his chief minister from 1726 until the Cardinal's death in 1743, at which time the young king took sole control of the kingdom. His reign of more than 58 years was the second-longest in the history of France, exceeded only by his predecessor and great-grandfather, Louis XIV.[2] In 1748, Louis returned the Austrian Netherlands, territory won at the Battle of Fontenoy
Battle of Fontenoy
of 1745
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Chateau De Versailles
The Palace of Versailles
Palace of Versailles
(French: Château
Château
de Versailles), or simply Versailles (English: /vɛərˈsaɪ/ vair-SY or /vərˈsaɪ/ vər-SY; French: [vɛʁsaj]), is a royal château in Versailles in the Île-de-France
Île-de-France
region of France. It is now open as a museum and is a very popular tourist attraction. When the château was built, the community of Versailles was a small village dating from the 11th century. Today, however, it is a wealthy suburb of Paris, some 20 kilometres (12 mi) southwest of the centre of the French capital.[1] Versailles was the seat of political power in the Kingdom of France
France
from 1682, when King Louis XIV
Louis XIV
moved the royal court from Paris, until the royal family was forced to return to the capital in October 1789, within three months after the beginning of the French Revolution
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Windlass
The windlass /ˈwɪndləs/ is an apparatus for moving heavy weights. Typically, a windlass consists of a horizontal cylinder (barrel), which is rotated by the turn of a crank or belt. A winch is affixed to one or both ends, and a cable or rope is wound around the winch, pulling a weight attached to the opposite end. The oldest depiction of a windlass for raising water can be found in the Book of Agriculture published in 1313 by the Chinese official Wang Zhen of the Yuan Dynasty (fl
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Leadscrew
A leadscrew (or lead screw), also known as an ice screw[1] or translation screw,[2] is a screw used as a linkage in a machine, to translate turning motion into linear motion. Because of the large area of sliding contact between their male and female members, screw threads have larger frictional energy losses compared to other linkages
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Winter Palace
The Winter Palace
Winter Palace
(Russian: Зимний дворец, IPA: [ˈzʲimnʲɪj dvɐˈrʲɛts], Zimnij dvorets) in Saint Petersburg, Russia, was, from 1732 to 1917, the official residence of the Russian monarchs. Today, the restored palace forms part of a complex of buildings housing the Hermitage Museum. Situated between the Palace Embankment and the Palace Square, adjacent to the site of Peter the Great's original Winter Palace, the present and fourth Winter Palace
Winter Palace
was built and altered almost continuously between the late 1730s and 1837, when it was severely damaged by fire and immediately rebuilt.[1] The storming of the palace in 1917 as depicted in Soviet paintings and Eisenstein's 1927 film October
October
became an iconic symbol of the Russian Revolution. The palace was constructed on a monumental scale that was intended to reflect the might and power of Imperial Russia
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Coal
Coal
Coal
is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock, formed as rock strata called coal seams
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Water Pressure
Pressure
Pressure
(symbol: p or P) is the force applied perpendicular to the surface of an object per unit area over which that force is distributed. Gauge pressure
Gauge pressure
(also spelled gage pressure)[a] is the pressure relative to the ambient pressure. Various units are used to express pressure. Some of these derive from a unit of force divided by a unit of area; the SI unit
SI unit
of pressure, the pascal (Pa), for example, is one newton per square metre; similarly, the pound-force per square inch (psi) is the traditional unit of pressure in the imperial and US customary systems. Pressure may also be expressed in terms of standard atmospheric pressure; the atmosphere (atm) is equal to this pressure, and the torr is defined as ​1⁄760 of this
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Lumber
Lumber
Lumber
(American English; used only in North America) or timber (used in the rest of the English speaking world) is a type of wood that has been processed into beams and planks, a stage in the process of wood production. Lumber
Lumber
is mainly used for structural purposes but has many other uses as well. There are two main types of lumber. It may be supplied either rough-sawn, or surfaced on one or more of its faces. Besides pulpwood, rough lumber is the raw material for furniture-making and other items requiring additional cutting and shaping
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Steam Power
A steam engine is a heat engine that performs mechanical work using steam as its working fluid. Steam
Steam
engines are external combustion engines,[2] where the working fluid is separated from the combustion products. Non-combustion heat sources such as solar power, nuclear power or geothermal energy may be used. The ideal thermodynamic cycle used to analyze this process is called the Rankine cycle. In the cycle, water is heated and changes into steam in a boiler operating at a high pressure. When expanded using pistons or turbines mechanical work is done. The reduced-pressure steam is then exhausted to the atmosphere, or condensed and pumped back into the boiler. In general usage, the term steam engine can refer to either complete steam plants (including boilers etc.) such as railway steam locomotives and portable engines, or may refer to the piston or turbine machinery alone, as in the beam engine and stationary steam engine
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Architect
An architect is a person who plans, designs, and reviews the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to provide services in connection with the design of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the buildings, that have as their principal purpose human occupancy or use.[1] Etymologically, architect derives from the Latin architectus, which derives from the Greek (arkhi-, chief + tekton, builder), i.e., chief builder.[2] Professionally, an architect's decisions affect public safety, and thus an architect must undergo specialized training consisting of advanced education and a practicum (or internship) for practical experience to earn a license to practice architecture
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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