HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Electroosmosis
Electroosmotic flow (or electro-osmotic flow, often abbreviated EOF; synonymous with electroosmosis or electroendosmosis) is the motion of liquid induced by an applied potential across a porous material, capillary tube, membrane, microchannel, or any other fluid conduit. Because electroosmotic velocities are independent of conduit size, as long as the electrical double layer is much smaller than the characteristic length scale of the channel, electroosmotic flow will have little effect. Electroosmotic flow is most significant when in small channels
[...More...]

"Electroosmosis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Electrical Double Layer
A double layer (DL, also called an electrical double layer, EDL) is a structure that appears on the surface of an object when it is exposed to a fluid. The object might be a solid particle, a gas bubble, a liquid droplet, or a porous body. The DL refers to two parallel layers of charge surrounding the object. The first layer, the surface charge (either positive or negative), consists of ions adsorbed onto the object due to chemical interactions. The second layer is composed of ions attracted to the surface charge via the Coulomb
Coulomb
force, electrically screening the first layer. This second layer is loosely associated with the object. It is made of free ions that move in the fluid under the influence of electric attraction and thermal motion rather than being firmly anchored
[...More...]

"Electrical Double Layer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Oxygen
Oxygen
Oxygen
is a chemical element with symbol O and atomic number 8. It is a member of the chalcogen group on the periodic table, a highly reactive nonmetal, and an oxidizing agent that readily forms oxides with most elements as well as with other compounds. By mass, oxygen is the third-most abundant element in the universe, after hydrogen and helium. At standard temperature and pressure, two atoms of the element bind to form dioxygen, a colorless and odorless diatomic gas with the formula O 2. Diatomic oxygen gas constitutes 20.8% of the Earth's atmosphere
[...More...]

"Oxygen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cohesion-tension Theory
Xylem
Xylem
is one of the two types of transport tissue in vascular plants, phloem being the other. The basic function of xylem is to transport water from roots to shoots and leaves, but it also transports some nutrients.[1][2] The word "xylem" is derived from the Greek word ξύλον (xylon), meaning "wood"; the best-known xylem tissue is wood, though it is found throughout the plant.[3] The term was introduced by Nägeli
Nägeli
in 1858.[4][5]Contents1 Structure 2 Primary and secondary xylem 3 Main function – upwards water transport3.1 Cohesion-tension theory 3.2 Measurement of pressure4 Evolution 5 Development5.1 Protoxylem and metaxylem 5.2 Patterns of protoxylem and metaxylem6 See also 7 References7.1 General referencesStructure[edit]Cross section of some xylem cellsThe most distinctive xylem cells are the long tracheary elements that transport water
[...More...]

"Cohesion-tension Theory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cytoplasmic Streaming
Cytoplasmic streaming, also called protoplasmic streaming and cyclosis, is the directed flow of cytosol (the liquid component of the cytoplasm) and organelles around fungal and plant cells. This movement aids in the delivery of organelles, nutrients, metabolites, genetic information, and other materials to all parts of the cell. Cytoplasmic streaming occurs as myosin-coated organelles move along actin filaments in the cytoskeleton of the cell, causing the cytosol to move as well.[1] Cytoplasmic streaming
Cytoplasmic streaming
was first discovered in the 1830s. The green alga genus Chara and other genera in the Division Charophyta, such as Coleochaete, are thought to be the closest relatives of land plants.[2] These haploid organisms contain some of the largest plant cells on earth, a single cell of which can reach up to 10 cm in length
[...More...]

"Cytoplasmic Streaming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Potential Difference
Voltage, electric potential difference, electric pressure or electric tension (formally denoted ∆V or ∆U, but more often simply as V or U, for instance in the context of Ohm's or Kirchhoff's circuit laws) is the difference in electric potential between two points. The voltage between two points is equal to the work done per unit of charge against a static electric field to move a test charge between two points
[...More...]

"Potential Difference" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

St Petersburg University
Saint Petersburg
Saint Petersburg
State University
University
(SPbU, Russian: Санкт-Петербургский государственный университет, СПбГУ) is a Russian federal state-owned higher education institution based in Saint Petersburg. It is the oldest and one of the largest universities in Russia. Founded in 1724 by a decree of Peter the Great, the University
University
from the very beginning has had a strong focus on fundamental research in science, engineering and humanities, and equipped its graduates with what it takes to contribute to Russia’s success. It is made up of 24 specialized faculties and institutes,the Academic Gymnasium, the Medical College, the College of Physical culture and Sports, Economics and Technology
[...More...]

"St Petersburg University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Electric Current
An electric current is a flow of electric charge.[1]:2 In electric circuits this charge is often carried by moving electrons in a wire. It can also be carried by ions in an electrolyte, or by both ions and electrons such as in an ionised gas (plasma).[2] The SI unit
SI unit
for measuring an electric current is the ampere, which is the flow of electric charge across a surface at the rate of one coulomb per second. Electric current
Electric current
is measured using a device called an ammeter.[3] Electric currents cause Joule
Joule
heating, which creates light in incandescent light bulbs. They also create magnetic fields, which are used in motors, inductors and generators. The moving charged particles in an electric current are called charge carriers. In metals, one or more electrons from each atom are loosely bound to the atom, and can move freely about within the metal
[...More...]

"Electric Current" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Faradaic Current
The faradaic current is the current generated by the reduction or oxidation of some chemical substance at an electrode.[1][2] The net faradaic current is the algebraic sum of all the faradaic currents flowing through an indicator electrode or working electrode.[3]Contents1 Limiting current 2 Migration current 3 See also 4 ReferencesLimiting current[edit] The limiting current in electrochemistry is the limiting value of a faradaic current that is approached as the rate of charge-transfer to an electrode is increased . The limiting current can be approached, for example, by increasing the electric potential or decreasing the rate of mass transfer to the electrode
[...More...]

"Faradaic Current" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Electrolysis Of Water
Electrolysis
Electrolysis
of water is the decomposition of water into oxygen and hydrogen gas due to an electric current passed through the water
[...More...]

"Electrolysis Of Water" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hydrogen Peroxide
Hydrogen
Hydrogen
peroxide is a chemical compound with the formula H 2O 2. In its pure form, it is a pale blue, clear liquid, slightly more viscous than water. Hydrogen
Hydrogen
peroxide is the simplest peroxide (a compound with an oxygen–oxygen single bond). It is used as an oxidizer, bleaching agent and antiseptic. Concentrated hydrogen peroxide, or "high-test peroxide", is a reactive oxygen species and has been used as a propellant in rocketry.[4] Its chemistry is dominated by the nature of its unstable peroxide bond. Hydrogen
Hydrogen
peroxide is unstable and slowly decomposes in the presence of base or a catalyst. Because of its instability, hydrogen peroxide is typically stored with a stabilizer in a weakly acidic solution. Hydrogen
Hydrogen
peroxide is found in biological systems including the human body
[...More...]

"Hydrogen Peroxide" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hydroxide
Hydroxide
Hydroxide
is a diatomic anion with chemical formula OH−. It consists of an oxygen and hydrogen atom held together by a covalent bond, and carries a negative electric charge. It is an important but usually minor constituent of water. It functions as a base, a ligand, a nucleophile and a catalyst. The hydroxide ion forms salts, some of which dissociate in aqueous solution, liberating solvated hydroxide ions. Sodium hydroxide
Sodium hydroxide
is a multi-million-ton per annum commodity chemical. A hydroxide attached to a strongly electropositive center may itself ionize,[citation needed] liberating a hydrogen cation (H+), making the parent compound an acid. The corresponding electrically neutral compound •HO is the hydroxyl radical. The corresponding covalently-bound group –OH of atoms is the hydroxyl group
[...More...]

"Hydroxide" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hydrogen
Hydrogen
Hydrogen
is a chemical element with symbol H and atomic number 1. With a standard atomic weight of 7000100800000000000♠1.008, hydrogen is the lightest element on the periodic table. Its monatomic form (H) is the most abundant chemical substance in the Universe, constituting roughly 75% of all baryonic mass.[7][note 1] Non-remnant stars are mainly composed of hydrogen in the plasma state. The most common isotope of hydrogen, termed protium (name rarely used, symbol 1H), has one proton and no neutrons. The universal emergence of atomic hydrogen first occurred during the recombination epoch. At standard temperature and pressure, hydrogen is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, non-toxic, nonmetallic, highly combustible diatomic gas with the molecular formula H2. Since hydrogen readily forms covalent compounds with most nonmetallic elements, most of the hydrogen on Earth exists in molecular forms such as water or organic compounds
[...More...]

"Hydrogen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cathode
A cathode is the electrode from which a conventional current leaves a polarized electrical device. (This definition can be recalled by using the mnemonic CCD for cathode current departs.) A conventional current describes the direction in which positive electronic charges move. Electrons have a negative electrical charge, so the movement of electrons is opposite to that of the conventional current flow (consequently, the mnemonic cathode current departs also means that electrons flow into the device's cathode). Cathode
Cathode
polarity with respect to the anode can be positive or negative depending on how the device is being operated
[...More...]

"Cathode" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Microfluidics
Microfluidics
Microfluidics
deals with the behaviour, precise control and manipulation of fluids that are geometrically constrained to a small, typically sub-millimeter, scale
[...More...]

"Microfluidics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.