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Electronic Music
Electronic music
Electronic music
is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. In general, a distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music), and that produced using electronics only.[1] Electromechanical instruments include mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers, and so on, and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers, or other sound-producing mechanisms
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Hardstyle
Hardstyle
Hardstyle
is an electronic dance genre mixing influences from techno and hardcore. Hardstyle
Hardstyle
typically consists of a deep, hard-sounding kick drum, intense faded or reversed basslines accompanying the beat, a dissonant synth melody story telling, and detuned and distorted sounds
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Electropunk
Punk
Punk
rock (or "punk") is a rock music genre that developed in the mid-1970s in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Rooted in 1960s garage rock and other forms of what is now known as "proto-punk" music, punk rock bands rejected perceived excesses of mainstream 1970s rock. Punk
Punk
bands typically produced short or fast-paced songs, with hard-edged melodies and singing styles, stripped-down instrumentation, and often political, anti-establishment lyrics. Punk
Punk
embraces a DIY ethic; many bands self-produce recordings and distribute them through independent record labels and other informal channels. The term "punk rock" was first used by certain American rock critics in the early 1970s to describe 1960s garage bands and subsequent acts then perceived as stylistic inheritors. Between 1974 and 1976 the movement now bearing the name "punk rock" emerged
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Electro Swing
Electro swing is a music genre that combines the influence of vintage or modern swing and jazz mixed with house, hip hop, and EDM. Successful examples of the genre create a modern and dance-floor focused sound that is more readily accessible to the modern ear, but that also retains the energetic excitement of live brass and early swing recordings.Contents1 Notable artists 2 Chart performance 3 References 4 External linksNotable artistsProleteR Caravan Palace Parov Stelar Jamie Berry Yolanda Be Cool Caro Emerald Dimie Cat Boogie BelgiqueChart performance<°_°> (also known as Robot Face) by French band Caravan Palace placed #3 on the Billboard US Top Dance/Electronic Albums chart.[dead link]ReferencesExternal linksSampling the Swing Era: The Role and Function Vintage Music Plays W
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Psychedelic Music
Psychedelic filmAcid Western Stoner filmPsychedelic literatureCultureCounterculture Entheogen Smart shop Trip sitter Psychedelic microdosingDrugs25I-NBOMe 2C-B Ayahuasca Cannabis DMT Ibogaine Ketamine LSD Mescaline Peyote Psilocybin
Psilocybin
mushrooms Salvinorin A/Salvia San Pedro cactusList of psychedelic drugs List of psilocybin mushrooms Psychoactive cactusExperienceBad trip Ecology Ego death Serotonergic psychedelic TherapyHistoryAcid Tests Albert Hofmann History of lysergic acid diethylamide Owsley Stanley Psychedelic era Summer of Love Timothy Leary William Leonard
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Dubstep
Dubstep
Dubstep
is a genre of electronic dance music that originated in South London in the late 1990s. It is generally characterized by sparse, syncopated rhythmic patterns with bass lines that contain prominent sub-bass frequencies. The style emerged as an offshoot of UK garage, drawing on a lineage of related styles such as 2-step, dub reggae, jungle, broken beat, and grime.[1][2] In the United Kingdom the origins of the genre can be traced back to the growth of the Jamaican sound system party scene in the early 1980s.[2][3] The earliest dubstep releases date back to 1998, and were usually featured as B-sides of 2-step garage single releases. These tracks were darker, more experimental remixes with less emphasis on vocals, and attempted to incorporate elements of breakbeat and drum and bass into 2-step
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Modernism (music)
In music, modernism is a philosophical and aesthetic stance underlying the period of change and development in musical language that occurred around the turn of the 20th century, a period of diverse reactions in challenging and reinterpreting older categories of music, innovations that lead to new ways of organizing and approaching harmonic, melodic, sonic, and rhythmic aspects of music, and changes in aesthetic worldviews in close relation to the larger identifiable period of modernism in the arts of the time. The operative word most associated with it is "innovation" (Metzer 2009, 3). Its leading feature is a "linguistic plurality", which is to say that no one music genre ever assumed a dominant position (Morgan 1984, 443).Inherent within musical modernism is the conviction that music is not a static phenomenon defined by timeless truths and classical principles, but rather something which is intrinsically historical and developmental
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Breakbeat
Breakbeat is a broad style of electronic or dance-oriented music which utilizes breaks, often sampled from earlier recordings in funk, jazz, and R&B, for the main rhythm. Breakbeats have been used in styles such as hip hop, jungle, drum and bass, hardcore, UK garage (including 2-step, breakstep and dubstep), and even pop and rock.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Evolution 4 Sampled breakbeats4.1 The "Amen break" 4.2 Legal issues5 Subgenres5.1 Big beat 5.2 Progressive breaks 5.3 Acid breaks6 Notable breakbeat artists 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEtymology[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Futurism
Futurism
Futurism
(Italian: Futurismo) was an artistic and social movement that originated in Italy
Italy
in the early 20th century. It emphasized speed, technology, youth, and violence, and objects such as the car, the aeroplane, and the industrial city. Although it was largely an Italian phenomenon, there were parallel movements in Russia, England, Belgium and elsewhere
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Jungle Music
Multiple issuesThis article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)This article possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed
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Neo Soul
Neo soul
Neo soul
is a genre of popular music. The term was coined by music industry entrepreneur Kedar Massenburg during the late 1990s to market and describe a style of music that emerged from soul and contemporary R&B. Heavily based in soul music, neo soul is distinguished by a less conventional sound than its contemporary R&B counterpart, with incorporated elements ranging from jazz, funk, hip hop and electronic to pop, fusion, and African music. It has been noted by music writers for its traditional R&B influences, conscious-driven lyrics, and strong female presence. Neo soul
Neo soul
developed during the 1980s and early 1990s, in the United States and United Kingdom, as a soul revival movement. It earned mainstream success during the 1990s, with the commercial and critical breakthroughs of several artists, including D'Angelo, Erykah Badu, Lauryn Hill, and Maxwell
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Post-disco
Post-disco
Post-disco
is a term to describe an aftermath in popular music history circa late 1979–1986, imprecisely beginning with an unprecedented backlash against disco music in the United States, leading to civil unrest and a riot in Chicago
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Computer Music
Computer music
Computer music
is the application of computing technology in music composition, to help human composers create new music or to have computers independently create music, such as with algorithmic composition programs. It includes the theory and application of new and existing computer software technologies and basic aspects of music, such as sound synthesis, digital signal processing, sound design, sonic diffusion, acoustics, and psychoacoustics
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Experimental Music
Experimental music is a general label for any music that pushes existing boundaries and genre definitions (Anon. & n.d.(c)). Experimental compositional practice is defined broadly by exploratory sensibilites radically opposed to, and questioning of, institutionalized compositional, performing, and aesthetic conventions in music (Sun 2013). Elements of experimental music include indeterminate music, in which the composer introduces the elements of chance or unpredictability with regard to either the composition or its performance. Artists may also approach a hybrid of disparate styles or incorporate unorthodox and unique elements (Anon. & n.d.(c)). The practice became prominent in the mid-20th century, particularly in Europe and North America. John Cage
John Cage
was one of the earliest composers to use the term and one of experimental music's primary innovators, utilizing indeterminacy techniques and seeking unknown outcomes
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Post-punk
Post-punk
Post-punk
(originally called new musick[2]) is a broad type of rock music that emerged from the punk movement of the 1970s, in which artists departed from the simplicity and traditionalism of punk rock to adopt a variety of avant-garde sensibilities
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Electro (music)
Electro (or electro-funk)[3][4] is a genre of electronic music and early hip hop directly influenced by the use of the Roland TR-808
Roland TR-808
drum machines,[5][6] and funk.[7][8] Records in the genre typically feature drum machines and heavy electronic sounds, usually without vocals, although if vocals are present they are delivered in a deadpan manner, often through electronic distortion such as vocoding and talkboxing. This is the main distinction between electro and previously prominent genres such as disco, in which the electronic sound was only part of the instrumentation. It also palpably deviates from its predecessor boogie for being less vocal-oriented and more focused on electronic beats produced by drum machines. Following the decline of disco music in the United States, electro emerged as a fusion of funk and New York boogie
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