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Electric Boat
Coordinates: 41°20′40″N 72°04′46″W / 41.344343°N 72.079526°W / 41.344343; -72.079526 General Dynamics
General Dynamics
Electric BoatTypeSubsidiaryIndustry ShipbuildingFounded 1899Founder Isaac RiceHeadquarters Groton, Connecticut, U.S.Number of locationsGroton, CT, Quonset Point, RI, New London, CTKey peopleJeff GeigerParent General DynamicsWebsite www.gdeb.com General Dynamics
General Dynamics
Electric Boat[1] (GDEB) is a subsidiary of General Dynamics Corporation
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Japanese Destroyer Yamakaze
Yamakaze (山風, ”Mountain Wind”)[1] was the eighth of ten Shiratsuyu-class destroyers, and the second to be built for the Imperial Japanese Navy
Imperial Japanese Navy
under the Circle Two Program (Maru Ni Keikaku).[2]Contents1 History 2 Operational history 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The Shiratsuyu-class destroyers were modified versions of the Hatsuharu class, and were designed to accompany the Japanese main striking force and to conduct both day and night torpedo attacks against the
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Nuclear Power
2012 World [civil] electricity generation by fuels (IEA, 2014)[4]   Coal/Peat (40.4%)   Natural Gas (22.5%)   Hydro (16.2%)    Nuclear fission
Nuclear fission
(10.9%)   Oil (5.0%)   Others (Renew.) (5.0%) Nuclear power
Nuclear power
is the use of nuclear reactions that release nuclear energy[5] to generate heat, which most frequently is then used in steam turbines to produce electricity in a nuclear power plant. The term includes nuclear fission, nuclear decay and nuclear fusion. Presently, the nuclear fission of elements in the actinide series of the periodic table produce the vast majority of nuclear energy in the direct service of humankind, with nuclear decay processes, primarily in the form of geothermal energy, and radioisotope thermoelectric generators, in niche uses making up the rest
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Submarine Chaser
A submarine chaser is a small and fast naval vessel that is specifically intended for anti-submarine warfare. Although similar vessels were designed and used by many nations, this designation was most famously used for ships built by the U.S.[citation needed] Many of the American submarine chasers used in World War I
World War I
found their way to Allied nations by way of Lend-Lease
Lend-Lease
in World War II.Contents1 Submarine
Submarine
chaser variants1.1 War service 1.2 Post-war 1.3 Survivors2 See also 3 References 4 External links Submarine
Submarine
chaser variants[edit] U.S. Navy submarine chasers were designed specifically to destroy German submarines in World War I, and Japanese and German submarines in World War II
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Motor Launch
A motor launch (ML) is a small military vessel in Royal Navy
Royal Navy
service. It was designed for harbour defence and submarine chasing or for armed high speed air-sea rescue.Contents1 World War I service 2 World War II types 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksWorld War I service[edit] Although small by naval standards, it was larger than the preceding Coastal Motor Boats of 40 and 55 ft length. The first motor launches entered service in the First World War. These were 580 80-foot-long (24 m) vessels built by the US Elco company for the Admiralty, receiving the designations ML-1 to ML-580. They served between 1916 and the end of the war with the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
defending the British coast from German submarines.[1] Some of the earliest examples, including ML 1, also served in the Persian Gulf from June 1916 onwards
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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PT Boat
A PT boat
PT boat
(short for Patrol Torpedo
Torpedo
boat) was a torpedo-armed fast attack craft used by the United States Navy
United States Navy
in World War II. It was small, fast, and inexpensive to build, valued for its maneuverability and speed but hampered at the beginning of the war by ineffective torpedoes, limited armament, and comparatively fragile construction that limited some of the variants to coastal waters. The PT boat
PT boat
was very different from the first generation of torpedo boat, which had been developed at the end of the 19th century and featured a displacement hull form
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Convair
Convair
Convair
was an American aircraft manufacturing company which later expanded into rockets and spacecraft. The company was formed in 1943 by the merger of Consolidated Aircraft
Consolidated Aircraft
and Vultee Aircraft, and went on to produce aircraft such as the Convair B-36
Convair B-36
Peacemaker, the F-102 Delta Dagger, the F-106 Delta Dart, the B-58 Hustler
B-58 Hustler
bomber, as well as the Convair 880
Convair 880
and Convair 990
Convair 990
jet airliners. It also manufactured the first Atlas rockets, including the rockets that were used for the manned orbital flights of Project Mercury. The company's subsequent Atlas-Centaur
Atlas-Centaur
design continued this success and derivatives of the design remain in use as of 2017
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Ballistic Missile Submarine
A ballistic missile submarine is a submarine capable of deploying submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs) with nuclear warheads. The United States
United States
Navy's hull classification symbols for ballistic missile submarines are SSB and SSBN – the SS denotes submarine (or submersible ship), the B denotes ballistic missile, and the N denotes that the submarine is nuclear powered. These submarines became a major weapon system in the Cold War
Cold War
because of their nuclear deterrence capability. They can fire missiles thousands of kilometers from their targets, and acoustic quieting makes them difficult to detect (see acoustic signature), thus making them a survivable deterrent in the event of a first strike and a key element of the mutual assured destruction policy of nuclear deterrence
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Royal Netherlands Navy
10,500 active duty personnel 850 reserve personnel6 frigates 4 offshore patrol vessels 6 minehunters 1 Joint Support Ship 2 landing platform docks 4 submarines 40 other ships20 helicoptersPart of Ministry of DefenceHeadquarters Den HelderMotto(s) "Veiligheid op en vanuit zee." Security on and from the sea.March Royal Netherlands
Netherlands
Navy
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Welding Defect
A welding defect is any flaw that compromises the usefulness of a weldment. There is a great variety of welding defects
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John Lehman
John Francis Lehman Jr. (born September 14, 1942) is an American investment banker and writer who served as Secretary of the Navy (1981-1987) in the Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan
administration where he promoted the creation of a 600-ship Navy.[1] From 2003 to 2004 he was a member of the 9/11 Commission. Lehman currently serves on the National Security Advisory Council for the Center for Security Policy (CSP), and on the board of trustees for the think tank Foreign Policy Research Institute
Foreign Policy Research Institute
(FPRI). Lehman is also a member of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States
United States
and has signed some policy letters produced by the Project for the New American Century. He also served as an advisor to Sen
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Kickback (bribery)
A kickback is a form of negotiated bribery in which a commission is paid to the bribe-taker in exchange for services rendered. Generally speaking, the remuneration (money, goods, or services handed over) is negotiated ahead of time
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Greece
Greece
Greece
(Greek: Ελλάδα), officially the Hellenic Republic (Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), historically also known as Hellas, is a country located in Southern Europe,[10] with a population of approximately 11 million as of 2016. Athens
Athens
is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki. Greece
Greece
is located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Situated on the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, it shares land borders with Albania
Albania
to the northwest, the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the north, and Turkey
Turkey
to the northeast
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Diesel-electric
A diesel–electric transmission, or diesel–electric powertrain, is used by a number of vehicle and ship types for providing locomotion. A diesel–electric transmission system includes a diesel engine connected to an electrical generator, creating electricity that powers electric traction motors. No clutch is required. Before diesel engines came into widespread use, a similar system, using a petrol (gasoline) engine and called petrol–electric or gas–electric, was sometimes used. Diesel–electric transmission
Diesel–electric transmission
is used on railways by diesel electric locomotives and diesel electric multiple units, as electric motors are able to supply full torque at 0 RPM
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