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Eldol
Eldol (Welsh: Eidol mab Arthmael) is a legendary king of Britain in Geoffrey of Monmouth's c. 1136 work Historia Regum Britanniae
Historia Regum Britanniae
("The History of the Kings of Britain"). A 6th century hero called Eidol is mentioned in The Gododdin but is unlikely to be the source for Geoffrey's Eldol. He should also not be confused with Eldol, Consul of Gloucester who lives generations later in Geoffrey's work. References[edit]Legendary titlesPreceded by Archmail King of Britain Succeeded by Redonv t eGeoffrey of MonmouthWorks Prophetiae Merlini
Prophetiae Merlini
(c. 1135) Historia Regum Britanniae
Historia Regum Britanniae
(c. 1136) Vita Merlini (c
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Welsh Language
All UK speakers: 700,000+ (2012)[1]Wales: 562,016 speakers (19.0% of the population of Wales),[2] (data from 2011 Census); All skills (speaking, reading, or writing): 630,062 language users[3] England: 110,000–150,000 (estimated) Argentina: 1,500-5,000[4][5](data not from 2011 census) Canada: L1,<3,885,[6] United States: ~2,235 (2009-2013) (2017)Language familyIndo-EuropeanCelticInsular CelticBrittonicWesternWelshEarly formsCommon BrittonicOld WelshMiddle WelshWriting systemLatin (Welsh alphabet) Welsh BrailleOfficial statusOfficial language inWalesRecognised minority language in United Kingdom
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Aeneas
In Greco-Roman
Greco-Roman
mythology, Aeneas
Aeneas
(/ɪˈniːəs/;[1] Greek: Αἰνείας, Aineías, possibly derived from Greek αἰνή meaning "praised") was a Trojan hero, the son of the prince Anchises and the goddess Aphrodite
Aphrodite
(Venus). His father was a first cousin of King Priam
Priam
of Troy
Troy
(both being grandsons of Ilus, founder of Troy), making Aeneas
Aeneas
a second cousin to Priam's children (such as Hector
Hector
and Paris). He is a character in Greek mythology
Greek mythology
and is mentioned in Homer's Iliad. Aeneas
Aeneas
receives full treatment in Roman mythology, most extensively in Virgil's Aeneid, where he is an ancestor of Romulus
Romulus
and Remus. He became the first true hero of Rome
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Carausius
Marcus Aurelius Mausaeus Valerius Carausius
Carausius
(died 293) was a military commander of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 3rd century. He was a Menapian from Belgic Gaul,[1] who usurped power in 286, during the Carausian Revolt, declaring himself emperor in Britain and northern Gaul (Imperium Britanniarum). He did this only 13 years after the Gallic Empire of the Batavian Postumus
Postumus
was ended in 273. He held power for seven years, fashioning the name "Emperor of the North" for himself, before being assassinated by his finance minister Allectus.Contents1 History 2 Legend 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Carausius
Carausius
was of humble origin, a Menapian who distinguished himself during Maximian's campaign against the Bagaudae rebels in northern Gaul
Gaul
in 286
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Caracalla
Caracalla
Caracalla
(/ˌkærəˈkælə/; Latin: Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius
Severus Antoninus Augustus;[1] 4 April 188 – 8 April 217), formally known as Antoninus, was a Roman emperor
Roman emperor
from AD 198 to 217. A member of the Severan Dynasty, he was the eldest son of Septimius Severus
Septimius Severus
and Julia Domna. Caracalla
Caracalla
reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. Caracalla
Caracalla
then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta, with whom he had a fraught relationship, until he had Geta murdered later that year
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Cadwaladr
Cadwaladr
Cadwaladr
ap Cadwallon (also spelled Cadwalader or Cadwallader in English) was king of Gwynedd in Wales
Wales
from around AD 655 to 682. Two devastating plagues happened during his reign, one in 664 and the other in 682; he himself was a victim of the second. Little else is known of his reign. Though little is known about the historical Cadwaladr, he became a mythical redeemer figure in Welsh culture. He is a prominent character in the romantic stories of Geoffrey of Monmouth, where he is portrayed as the last in an ancient line to hold the title King of Britain. In Geoffrey's account, he does not die of plague. He renounces his throne in 688 to become a pilgrim, in response to a prophecy that his sacrifice of personal power will bring about a future victory of the Britons over the Anglo-Saxons
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Ascanius
Ascanius
Ascanius
(/əˈskeɪniəs/) (said to have reigned 1176-1138 BC)[1] a legendary king of Alba Longa
Alba Longa
and is the son of the Trojan hero Aeneas and either Creusa, daughter of Priam, or Lavinia, daughter of Latinus. He is a character in Roman mythology, and has a divine lineage, being the son of Aeneas, who is the son of the goddess Venus and the hero Anchises, a relative of the king Priam; thus Ascanius
Ascanius
has divine ascendents by both parents, being descendant of god Jupiter, his wife Juno and Dardanus. He is also an ancestor of Romulus, Remus
Remus
and the Gens Julia
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Allectus
Allectus
Allectus
(died 296) was a Roman-Britannic usurper-emperor in Britain and northern Gaul
Gaul
from 293 to 296.[1] History[edit] Allectus
Allectus
was treasurer to Carausius, a Menapian officer in the Roman navy who had seized power in Britain and northern Gaul
Gaul
in 286. In 293 Carausius
Carausius
was isolated when the western Caesar, Constantius Chlorus, retook some of his Gallic territories, particularly the crucial port of Bononia (modern Boulogne), and defeated his Frankish allies in Batavia. Allectus
Allectus
assassinated Carausius
Carausius
and assumed command himself.Medal of Constantius I capturing London
London
(inscribed as LON) after defeating Allectus. Beaurains hoard.His reign has left little record, although his coin issues display a similar distribution to those of Carausius
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Alhfrith Of Deira
Alhfrith or Ealhfrith (c. 630 – c. 664) was King of Deira
King of Deira
under his father Oswiu, King of Bernicia, from 655 until sometime after 664. Appointed by Oswiu
Oswiu
as a subordinate ruler, Alhfrith apparently clashed with his father over religious policy, which came to a head at the Synod of Whitby
Synod of Whitby
in 664. After this, Alhfrith disappears from the historical record.Contents1 Life 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Alhfrith was the oldest son of Oswiu, who became King of Bernicia
King of Bernicia
in 642
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Saint Alban
Saint
Saint
Alban (/ˈɔːlbən, ˈæl-/; Latin: Albanus) is venerated as the first-recorded British Christian
Christian
martyr,[1] and he is considered to be the British protomartyr. Along with fellow Saints Julius and Aaron, Alban is one of three named martyrs recorded at an early date from Roman Britain
Roman Britain
("Amphibalus" was the name given much later to the priest he was said to have been protecting)
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Augustine Of Canterbury
Augustine of Canterbury
Canterbury
(born first third of the 6th century – died probably 26 May 604) was a Catholic
Catholic
Benedictine monk who became the first Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
in the year 597. He is considered the "Apostle to the English" and a founder of the Catholic
Catholic
Church in England.[3] Augustine was the prior of a monastery in Rome
Rome
when Pope Gregory the Great chose him in 595 to lead a mission, usually known as the Gregorian mission, to Britain to Christianize King Æthelberht and his Kingdom of Kent
Kent
from Anglo-Saxon paganism. Kent
Kent
was probably chosen because Æthelberht had married a Christian princess, Bertha, daughter of Charibert I
Charibert I
the King of Paris, who was expected to exert some influence over her husband
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Y Gododdin
Y Gododdin
Gododdin
(Welsh: [ə ɡɔˈdɔðɪn]) is a medieval Welsh poem consisting of a series of elegies to the men of the Brittonic kingdom of Gododdin
Gododdin
and its allies who, according to the conventional interpretation, died fighting the Angles
Angles
of Deira
Deira
and Bernicia
Bernicia
at a place named Catraeth in c. AD 600. It is traditionally ascribed to the bard Aneirin and survives only in one manuscript, the Book of Aneirin. The Book of Aneirin
Book of Aneirin
manuscript is from the later 13th century, but Y Gododdin
Gododdin
has been dated to anywhere between the 7th and the early 11th centuries. The text is partly written in Middle Welsh orthography and partly in Old Welsh
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Roman De Brut
Roman de Brut
Roman de Brut
(meaning "Novel of Brut") or "Brut" is a verse literary history of Britain by the poet Wace. Written in the Norman language, it consists of 14,866 lines. It is based on Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae, and was probably begun around 1150 and finished in 1155. It was intended for a Norman audience interested in the legends and history of the new territories of the Anglo-Norman realm, covering the story of King Arthur and taking the history of Britain all the way back to the mythical Brutus of Troy. The Brut was the most popular of Wace's works and survives in more than 30 manuscripts or fragments. It was used by Layamon as the basis for his Brut and inspired Robert de Boron's Merlin
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Cadoc
Saint Cadoc
Cadoc
or Cadog (Medieval Latin: Cadocus; also Welsh: Cattwg; born c. 497[1] or before) was a 5th–6th-century Abbot
Abbot
of Llancarfan, near Cowbridge
Cowbridge
in Glamorganshire, Wales, a monastery famous from the era of the British church as a centre of learning, where Illtud
Illtud
spent the first period of his religious life under Cadoc's tutelage. Cadoc
Cadoc
is credited with the establishment of many churches in Cornwall, Brittany[2] Dyfed
Dyfed
and Scotland. He is known as Cattwg Ddoeth, "the Wise", and a large collection of his maxims and moral sayings were included in Volume III of the Myvyrian Archaiology. He is listed in the 2004 edition of the Roman Martyrology under 21 September
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Bledudo
Bledudo (Welsh: Blaiddyd) was a legendary king of the Britons as accounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth and the second to bear this name. He was preceded by Merianus and succeeded by Cap. References[edit]Legendary titlesPreceded by Merianus King of Britain Succeeded by Capv t eGeoffrey of MonmouthWorks Prophetiae Merlini
Prophetiae Merlini
(c. 1135) Historia Regum Britanniae
Historia Regum Britanniae
(c. 1136) Vita Merlini (c
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Brennius
Brennius was a legendary king of Northumberland
Northumberland
and Allobroges, as recounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth. He was the son of Dunvallo Molmutius and brother of Belinus, probably based upon one or both of the historical Brenni.Contents1 Claimant to the throne of Britain 2 Duke of the Allobroges 3 Conqueror of Rome 4 Comments on historicity 5 ReferencesClaimant to the throne of Britain[edit] In an effort to win the crown of Britain, Brennius and Balinus waged war between each other to determine who should succeed their father. Many battles were fought between the two brothers until a time came when their friends intervened and a compromise was decided upon. Belinus became the King of the Britons with Brennius as King of Northumberland. Five years later, Brennius wed the daughter of the King of Norway without consulting Belinus
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