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Ein Dor
Ein Dor
Ein Dor
(Hebrew: עֵין דּוֹר‬, lit. "Spring of a Generation") is a kibbutz in northern Israel. Located in the Lower Galilee, it falls under the jurisdiction of Jezreel Valley Regional Council. In 2016 it had a population of 1,021.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Economy 4 Notable residents 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The kibbutz is named for Endor, a village mentioned in the Bible
Bible
- an accordance with the common Zionist practice of bestowing Biblical names on modern communities and towns. After the death of the prophet Samuel, King Saul comes to Endor to meet a woman medium (the Witch of Endor) who helps him to contact the spirit of Samuel. The prophecy he receives is that his army will be vanquished and that he and his sons would die in battle. (Samuel 28:3-19). However, it is by no means certain that the kibbutz's location is anywhere near to where the Biblical village stood
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Bible
Bible
(from Koine Greek
Koine Greek
τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, "the books")[1] is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures that Jews
Jews
and Christians consider to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans. Many different authors contributed to the Bible
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Moshav
Moshav
Moshav
(Hebrew: מוֹשָׁב‬, plural מוֹשָׁבִים‬ moshavim, lit. settlement, village) is a type of Israeli town or settlement, in particular a type of cooperative agricultural community of individual farms pioneered by the Labour Zionists during the second wave of aliyah. A resident or a member of a moshav can be called a "moshavnik" (מוֹשַׁבְנִיק‬). The moshavim are similar to kibbutzim with an emphasis on community labour. They were designed as part of the Zionist state-building programme following the green revolution Yishuv
Yishuv
("settlement") in the British Mandate of Palestine
British Mandate of Palestine
during the early 20th century, but in contrast to the collective kibbutzim, farms in a moshav tended to be individually owned but of fixed and equal size
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Districts Of Israel
There are six main administrative districts of Israel, known in Hebrew as mehozot (מחוזות; singular: mahoz מָחוֹז‬) and Arabic as mintaqah and fifteen sub-districts (also referred to as counties) known as nafot (נפות‬; singular: nafa נָפָה‬). Each sub-district is further divided into Cities, municipalities, and Regional councils it contains. The figures in this article are based on numbers from the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics and so include all places under Israeli civilian rule including those Israeli-occupied territories
Israeli-occupied territories
where this is the case. Therefore, the Golan sub-district and its four natural regions are included in the number of sub-districts and natural regions even though it is not recognized by the United Nations
United Nations
or the international community as Israeli territory
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South America
South America
South America
is a continent located in the western hemisphere, mostly in the southern hemisphere, with a relatively small portion in the northern hemisphere. It may also be considered a subcontinent of the Americas,[3][4] which is how it is viewed in the Spanish and Portuguese-speaking regions of the Americas. The reference to South America instead of other regions (like Latin America
Latin America
or the Southern Cone) has increased in the last decades due to changing geopolitical dynamics (in particular, the rise of Brazil).[5] It is bordered on the west by the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
and on the north and east by the Atlantic
Atlantic
Ocean; North America
North America
and the Caribbean Sea
Caribbean Sea
lie to the northwest
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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Hungary
Coordinates: 47°N 20°E / 47°N 20°E / 47; 20Hungary Magyarország  (Hungarian)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Himnusz" (Hungarian)[1] "Hymn"Location of  Hungary  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Budapest 47°26′N 19°15′E / 47.433°N 19.250°E / 47.433; 19.250Official language and national language Hungarian[2]Ethnic groups (2011)80.7% Hungarians 14.7% not declared 3.1% Roma 1.3% Germans[3]Religion52.9% Christianity –38.9% Catholicism –13.7% Protestantism –0.1% Orthodox Church 0.1% Judaism 1.7% other 18.2% not religious 27.2% unanswered[4]Demonym HungarianGovernment Unitary parliamentary constitutional republic• PresidentJános Áder• Prime MinisterViktor O
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Books Of Samuel
The Books of Samuel,[a] 1 Samuel
Samuel
and 2 Samuel, form part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im
Nevi'im
or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, and are considered by many biblical scholars to belong to the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel
Samuel
and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites
Israelites
and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.[1] According to Jewish tradition, the book was written by Samuel, with additions by the prophets Gad and Nathan;[2] modern scholarly thinking is that the entire Deuteronomistic history was composed in the period c. 630–540 BC by combining a number of independent texts of various ages.[3][4] Samuel
Samuel
begins with the prophet Samuel's birth[5] and God's call to him as a boy
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Saul The King
Saul
Saul
(/sɔːl/; Hebrew: שָׁאוּל‬, Modern Ša’ul, Tiberian Šā’ul, meaning "asked for, prayed for"; Latin: Saul; Arabic: طالوت‎, Ṭālūt or شاؤل, Ša'ūl), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel
Israel
and Judah. His reign, traditionally placed in the late 11th century BCE,[1] marked a transition from a tribal society to statehood.[2] Saul's life and reign are described in the Hebrew Bible. He was anointed by the prophet Samuel
Samuel
and reigned from Gibeah. He fell on his sword (committing suicide) to avoid capture in the battle against the Philistines
Philistines
at Mount Gilboa, during which three of his sons were also killed. The succession to his throne was contested by Ish-bosheth, his only surviving son, and his son-in-law David, who eventually prevailed
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Samuel (Bible)
Samuel
Samuel
is a figure in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
who plays a key role in the narrative, in the transition from the period of the biblical judges to the institution of a kingdom under Saul, and again in the transition from Saul
Saul
to David. He is venerated as a prophet by Jews, Christians, and Muslims
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Zionism
Zionism
Zionism
(Hebrew: צִיּוֹנוּת‬ Tsiyyonut Hebrew pronunciation: [t͡sijo̞ˈnut] after Zion) is the national movement of the Jewish people
Jewish people
that supports the
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Witch Of Endor
In the Hebrew Bible, the Witch of Endor
Witch of Endor
was a woman who summoned the prophet Samuel's spirit, at the demand of King Saul of the Kingdom of Israel in the First Book of Samuel.[1] The witch is absent from the version of that event recounted in the deuterocanonical Book of Sirach (46:19–20). Witch of Endor
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Israel
Coordinates: 31°N 35°E / 31°N 35°E / 31; 35State of Israelמְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל (Hebrew) دَوْلَة إِسْرَائِيل (Arabic)FlagEmblemAnthem: "Hatikvah" (Hebrew for "The Hope")(pre-) 1967 border (Green Line)Capital and largest city Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(limited recognition)[fn 1] 31°47′N 35°13′E / 31.783°N 35.217°E / 31.783; 35.217Official languagesHebrew ArabicEthnic
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Kibbutz
A kibbutz (Hebrew: קִבּוּץ‬ / קיבוץ‬, lit. "gathering, clustering"; regular plural kibbutzim קִבּוּצִים‬ / קיבוצים‬) is a collective community in Israel
Israel
that was traditionally based on agriculture. The first kibbutz, established in 1909, was Degania.[1] Today, farming has been partly supplanted by other economic branches, including industrial plants and high-tech enterprises.[2] Kibbutzim began as utopian communities, a combination of socialism and Zionism.[3] In recent decades, some kibbutzim have been privatized and changes have been made in the communal lifestyle. A member of a kibbutz is called a kibbutznik (Hebrew: קִבּוּצְנִיק‬ / קיבוצניק‬; plural kibbutznikim or kibbutzniks). In 2010, there were 270 kibbutzim in Israel
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Hebrew Language
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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