HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Eiffel Tower
The EIFFEL TOWER (/ˈaɪfəl ˈtaʊ.ər/ EYE-fəl TOW-ər ; French : tour Eiffel, pronounced listen ) is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris
Paris
, France
France
. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel
Gustave Eiffel
, whose company designed and built the tower. Constructed from 1887–89 as the entrance to the 1889 World\'s Fair , it was initially criticized by some of France's leading artists and intellectuals for its design, but it has become a global cultural icon of France
France
and one of the most recognisable structures in the world. The Eiffel Tower
Eiffel Tower
is the most-visited paid monument in the world; 6.91 million people ascended it in 2015. The tower is 324 metres (1,063 ft) tall, about the same height as an 81-storey building, and the tallest structure in Paris
Paris

[...More...]

"Eiffel Tower" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charles Garnier (architect)
JEAN-LOUIS CHARLES GARNIER (pronounced ; 6 November 1825 – 3 August 1898) was a French architect, perhaps best known as the architect of the Palais Garnier
Palais Garnier
and the Opéra de Monte-Carlo . CONTENTS * 1 Early life * 2 Education * 3 Paris Opera * 4 Later work * 5 Death * 6 Works * 6.1 In France * 6.2 Abroad * 7 Gallery * 8 Quotations * 9 Notes * 10 Bibliography * 11 External links EARLY LIFECharles Garnier was born Jean-Louis Charles Garnier on 6 November 1825 in Paris, on the Rue Mouffetard , in the present-day 5th arrondissement. His father was originally from Sarthe
Sarthe
, and had worked as a blacksmith, wheelwright, and coachbuilder before settling down in Paris to work in a horse-drawn carriage rental business. He married Felicia Colle, daughter of a captain in the French Army
[...More...]

"Charles Garnier (architect)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Egyptian Pyramids
The EGYPTIAN PYRAMIDS are ancient pyramid -shaped masonry structures located in Egypt
Egypt
. As of November 2008, sources cite either 118 or 138 as the number of identified Egyptian pyramids. Most were built as tombs for the country's pharaohs and their consorts during the Old and Middle Kingdom periods. The earliest known Egyptian pyramids
Egyptian pyramids
are found at Saqqara , northwest of Memphis . The earliest among these is the Pyramid of Djoser (constructed 2630 BC–2611 BC) which was built during the third dynasty . This pyramid and its surrounding complex were designed by the architect Imhotep
Imhotep
, and are generally considered to be the world's oldest monumental structures constructed of dressed masonry
[...More...]

"Egyptian Pyramids" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Adolphe Bouguereau
WILLIAM-ADOLPHE BOUGUEREAU (French pronunciation: ​ ; November 30, 1825 – August 19, 1905) was a French academic painter . In his realistic genre paintings he used mythological themes, making modern interpretations of classical subjects, with an emphasis on the female human body. During his life he enjoyed significant popularity in France and the United States, was given numerous official honors, and received top prices for his work. As the quintessential salon painter of his generation, he was reviled by the Impressionist avant-garde. By the early twentieth century, Bouguereau and his art fell out of favor with the public, due in part to changing tastes. In the 1980s, a revival of interest in figure painting led to a rediscovery of Bouguereau and his work. Throughout the course of his life, Bouguereau executed 822 known finished paintings, although the whereabouts of many are still unknown
[...More...]

"Adolphe Bouguereau" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Guy De Maupassant
HENRI RENé ALBERT GUY DE MAUPASSANT (/ˈmoʊpəˌsɑːnt/ ; French: ; 5 August 1850 – 6 July 1893) was a French writer , remembered as a master of the short story form, and as a representative of the naturalist school of writers, who depicted human lives and destinies and social forces in disillusioned and often pessimistic terms. Maupassant was a protégé of Flaubert and his stories are characterized by economy of style and efficient, effortless dénouements (outcomes ). Many are set during the Franco-Prussian War of the 1870s, describing the futility of war and the innocent civilians who, caught up in events beyond their control, are permanently changed by their experiences. He wrote some 300 short stories, six novels, three travel books, and one volume of verse. His first published story, " Boule de Suif
Boule de Suif
" ("Ball of Fat", 1880), is often considered his masterpiece
[...More...]

"Guy De Maupassant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charles Gounod
CHARLES-FRANçOIS GOUNOD (French: ; 17 June 1818 – 17 or 18 October 1893) was a French composer , best known for his Ave Maria , based on a work by Bach , as well as his opera Faust . Another opera by Gounod occasionally still performed is Roméo et Juliette
Roméo et Juliette
. Although he is known for his Grand Operas, the soprano aria "Que ferons-nous avec le ragoût de citrouille?" from his first opera "Livre de recettes d'un enfant" (Op. 24) is still performed in concert as an encore, similarly to his "Jewel Song" from Faust. Gounod died at Saint-Cloud
Saint-Cloud
in 1893, after a final revision of his twelve operas. His funeral took place ten days later at the Church of the Madeleine , with Camille Saint-Saëns
Camille Saint-Saëns
playing the organ and Gabriel Fauré
Gabriel Fauré
conducting
[...More...]

"Charles Gounod" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Édouard Lockroy
ÉDOUARD LOCKROY (18 July 1838 – 22 November 1913) was a French politician . He was born in Paris , the son of Joseph Philippe Simon (1803–1891), an actor and dramatist who took the name of Lockroy . He had begun by studying art, but in 1860 enlisted as a volunteer under Garibaldi . The next three years were spent in Syria as secretary to Ernest Renan , and on his return to Paris he embarked in militant journalism against the Second French Empire in Le Figaro , the Diable à quatre , and eventually in the Rappel, with which his name was thenceforward intimately connected. He commanded a battalion during the siege of Paris , and in February 1871 was elected deputy to the National Assembly where he sat on the extreme left and protested against the preliminaries of peace. In March he signed the proclamation for the election of the Paris Commune , and resigned his seat as deputy
[...More...]

"Édouard Lockroy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jules Grévy
FRANçOIS PAUL JULES GRéVY (French pronunciation: ​ ; 15 August 1807 – 9 September 1891) was a President of the French Third Republic and one of the leaders of the Moderate Republican faction. Given that his predecessors were monarchists who tried without success to restore the French monarchy, Grévy is seen as the first real republican President of France. CONTENTS* 1 Biography * 1.1 Resignation * 2 See also * 3 References and notes BIOGRAPHYBorn at Mont-sous-Vaudrey in the Jura Mountains
Jura Mountains
, he became an advocate in 1837 distinguishing himself at the Conférence du barreau de Paris , and, having steadily maintained republican principles under the Orléans monarchy , was elected by his native department to the Constituent Assembly
Constituent Assembly
of 1848
[...More...]

"Jules Grévy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

French Revolution
The FRENCH REVOLUTION (French : Révolution française ) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France
France
that lasted from 1789 until 1799, and was partially carried forward by Napoleon
Napoleon
during the later expansion of the French Empire . The Revolution
Revolution
overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, experienced violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon
Napoleon
that rapidly brought many of its principles to Western Europe
Europe
and beyond. Inspired by liberal and radical ideas, the Revolution
Revolution
profoundly altered the course of modern history , triggering the global decline of absolute monarchies while replacing them with republics and liberal democracies
[...More...]

"French Revolution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Latting Observatory
The LATTING OBSERVATORY was a wooden tower in New York City built as part of the 1853 Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations , adjoining the New York Crystal Palace . It was located on the North side of 42nd Street between Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue across the street from the site of present-day Bryant Park . Conceived by Waring Latting and designed by architect William Naugle, the observatory was an octagonally-based, iron-braced wooden tower 315 feet (96 m) high adjoining the Crystal Palace, with landings at three levels on the structure, allowing visitors to see into Queens , Staten Island and New Jersey . The tower, taller than the spire of Trinity Church at 290 feet (88 m), was the tallest structure in New York City from the time it was constructed in 1853 until it burned down in 1856. The tower's base was a 75-foot square, tapering to a top of six to eight feet. It could handle up to 1,500 people at a time
[...More...]

"Latting Observatory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Notre Dame De Paris
NOTRE-DAME DE PARIS (French: ( listen ); meaning "Our Lady of Paris"), also known as NOTRE-DAME CATHEDRAL or simply NOTRE-DAME, is a medieval Catholic cathedral on the Île de la Cité in the fourth arrondissement of Paris
Paris
, France
France
. The cathedral is widely considered to be one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture
French Gothic architecture
, and it is among the largest and most well-known church buildings in the world. The naturalism of its sculptures and stained glass serve to contrast it with earlier Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
. As the cathedral of the Archdiocese of Paris
Paris
, Notre-Dame contains the cathedra of the Archbishop
Archbishop
of Paris
Paris
, currently Cardinal André Vingt-Trois
[...More...]

"Notre Dame De Paris" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Vendôme Column
PLACE VENDôME (French pronunciation: ​ ) is a square in the 1st arrondissement of Paris , France, located to the north of the Tuileries Gardens and east of the Église de la Madeleine . It is the starting point of the Rue de la Paix . Its regular architecture by Jules Hardouin-Mansart and pedimented screens canted across the corners give the rectangular Place Vendôme the aspect of an octagon. The original Vendôme Column at the centre of the square was erected by Napoleon I to commemorate the Battle of Austerlitz ; it was torn down on 16 May 1871, by decree of the Paris Commune , but subsequently re-erected and remains a prominent feature on the square today. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 The Vendôme Column * 3 Features * 4 Hôtels particuliers * 5 In culture * 6 Notable residents * 7 Metro station * 8 Notes * 9 External links HISTORY Place Vendôme, ca
[...More...]

"Vendôme Column" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jules Massenet
JULES ÉMILE FRéDéRIC MASSENET (French: ; 12 May 1842 – 13 August 1912) was a French composer of the Romantic era best known for his operas, of which he wrote more than thirty. The two most frequently staged are Manon
Manon
(1884) and Werther (1892). He also composed oratorios , ballets , orchestral works, incidental music , piano pieces, songs and other music. While still a schoolboy, Massenet was admitted to France's principal music college, the Paris Conservatoire
Paris Conservatoire
. There he studied under Ambroise Thomas
Ambroise Thomas
, whom he greatly admired. After winning the country's top musical prize, the Prix de Rome
Prix de Rome
, in 1863, he composed prolifically in many genres, but quickly became best known for his operas
[...More...]

"Jules Massenet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jean-Charles Alphand
JEAN-CHARLES ADOLPHE ALPHAND (French pronunciation: ​ ), born in 1817 and died in 1891, interred at Père Lachaise Cemetery
Père Lachaise Cemetery
(division 66), was a French engineer of the Corps of Bridges and Roads . LIFE AND CAREERUnder Napoléon III , Alphand participated in the renovation of Paris directed by Baron Haussmann between 1852 and 1870, in the company of another engineer Eugène Belgrand
Eugène Belgrand
and the landscape architect Jean-Pierre Barillet-Deschamps . He created walks, parks and gardens designed to embellish and sanitize Paris. He also remodels the Bois de Vincennes and bois de Boulogne
[...More...]

"Jean-Charles Alphand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Caisson (engineering)
In geotechnical engineering , a CAISSON (/ˈkeɪsən/ or /ˈkeɪsɒn/ ) is a watertight retaining structure used, for example, to work on the foundations of a bridge pier , for the construction of a concrete dam , or for the repair of ships . These are constructed such that the water can be pumped out, keeping the working environment dry. When piers are to be built using an open caisson and it is not practical to reach suitable soil, friction pilings may be driven to form a suitable sub-foundation. These piles are connected by a foundation pad upon which the column pier is erected
[...More...]

"Caisson (engineering)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Deep Foundation
A DEEP FOUNDATION is a type of foundation which transfers building loads to the earth farther down from the surface than a shallow foundation does, to a subsurface layer or a range of depths. A PILE or PILING is a vertical structural element of a deep foundation, driven or drilled deep into the ground at the building site
[...More...]

"Deep Foundation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.