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Eglinton Castle
Eglinton Castle
Eglinton Castle
was a large Gothic castellated mansion in Kilwinning, North Ayrshire, Scotland.Contents1 History1.1 The castle1.1.1 Covenating times 1.1.2 Ley tunnels1.2 The Pleasure gardens1.2.1 Notable trees1.3 The Eglinton Tournament 1.4 The demise of the castle2 Eglinton family micro-history2.1 Eglinton Country Park3 The castle and estate prior to the establishment of the country park3.1 The intact castle – exterior 3.2 The castle interior 3.3 Castle ruins 3.4 Estate features3.4.1 Lady Susan
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North Ayrshire
North Ayrshire
North Ayrshire
(Scottish Gaelic: Siorrachd Àir a Tuath, pronounced [ʃirˠəxk aːɾʲ ə t̪ʰuə]) is one of 32 council areas in Scotland. It has a population of roughly 135,900 people.[1] It is located in the southwest of Scotland, and borders the areas of Inverclyde
Inverclyde
to the north, Renfrewshire
Renfrewshire
to the northeast and East Ayrshire and South Ayrshire
South Ayrshire
to the east and south respectively. North Ayrshire Council is a hung Council. North Ayrshire
North Ayrshire
also forms part of the east coast of the Firth of Clyde.[2]Contents1 History and formation 2 Government 3 Towns and villages 4 Places of interest 5 References 6 External linksHistory and formation[edit] The area was created in 1996 as a successor to the district of Cunninghame. The council headquarters are located in Irvine, which is the largest town
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British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
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Sir William Brereton, 1st Baronet
Sir William Brereton, 1st Baronet
Sir William Brereton, 1st Baronet
(13 September 1604 – 7 April 1661) was an English writer and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1628 and 1659. He was a commander in the Parliamentary army in the English Civil War.Contents1 Early life 2 Parliamentary career 3 Military career 4 Later career 5 Family 6 References 7 FootnotesEarly life[edit] Brereton was the son of William Brereton and was baptised at Collegiate Church, Manchester, in 1604. He matriculated at Brasenose College, Oxford on 2 November 1621, aged 18 and was a student of Gray's Inn
Gray's Inn
in 1623. He was then of Handforth Hall, Cheshire.[1] He worked hard to increase the value of his estates. For example, he was interested in field sports and built a duck decoy at Dodleston
Dodleston
which became something of a commercial operation
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Medieval
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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Tournament
A tournament is a competition involving a relatively large number of competitors, all participating in a sport or game. More specifically, the term may be used in either of two overlapping senses:One or more competitions held at a single venue and concentrated into a relatively short time interval. A competition involving a number of matches, each involving a subset of the competitors, with the overall tournament winner determined based on the combined results of these individual matches. These are common in those sports and games where each match must involve a small number of competitors: often precisely two, as in most team sports, racket sports and combat sports, many card games and board games, and many forms of competitive debating. Such tournaments allow large numbers to compete against each other in spite of the restriction on numbers in a single match.These two senses are distinct
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Archibald Montgomerie, 13th Earl Of Eglinton
Archibald William Montgomerie, 13th Earl of Eglinton, 1st Earl of Winton, KT, PC (29 September 1812 – 4 October 1861), styled Lord Montgomerie from 1814 to 1819, was a British Conservative politician. He was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in 1852 and again from 1858 to 1859.Contents1 Background and education 2 Political career 3 Horse racing 4 The Eglinton Tournament 5 Family 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksBackground and education[edit] Eglinton was born in Palermo, Sicily, the son of Major-General Archibald Montgomerie, Lord Montgomerie (30 July 1773 – 4 January 1814), the eldest son of Hugh Montgomerie, 12th Earl of Eglinton. His mother was Lady Mary Montgomerie (d. 1848), daughter of General Archibald Montgomerie, 11th Earl of Eglinton. He was educated at Eton.[1] As a pastime he enjoyed playing golf. One of his playing partners was James Ogilvie Fairlie.[2] Political career[edit] Eglinton was a staunch Tory
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Jousting
Jousting
Jousting
is a martial game or hastilude between two horsemen wielding lances with blunted tips, often as part of a tournament. The primary aim was to replicate a clash of heavy cavalry, with each participant trying hard to strike the opponent while riding towards him at high speed, if possible breaking the lance on the opponent's shield or jousting armour, or unhorsing him. The joust became an iconic characteristic of the knight in Romantic medievalism. The participants experience close to three and a quarter times their body weight in G-forces when the lances collide with their armor.[1] The term is derived from Old French joster, ultimately from Latin iuxtare "to approach, to meet". The word was loaned into Middle English around 1300, when jousting was a very popular sport among the Anglo-Norman knighthood. The synonym tilt dates ca
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Emperor Of The French
Emperor
Emperor
of the French (French: Empereur des Français) was the title used by the House of Bonaparte
House of Bonaparte
starting when Napoleon
Napoleon
Bonaparte was given the title of Emperor
Emperor
on 14 May 1804 by the French Senate
French Senate
and was crowned emperor of the French on 2 December 1804 at the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris, in Paris, with the Crown of Napoleon. The title emphasized that the emperor ruled over "the French people" (the nation) and not over France (the republic). The old formula of "King of France" indicated that the king owned France as a personal possession
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Napoléon III Of France
Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte (born Charles-Louis Napoléon Bonaparte; 20 April 1808 – 9 January 1873) was the President of France
President of France
from 1848 to 1852 and, as Napoleon
Napoleon
III, the Emperor of the French
Emperor of the French
from 1852 to 1870. He was the only president of the French Second Republic
French Second Republic
and the head of the Second French Empire. The nephew and heir of Napoleon
Napoleon
I, he was the first Head of State
Head of State
of France
France
to hold the title of President, the first elected by a direct popular vote, and the youngest until the election of Emmanuel Macron in 2017
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Second World War
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Largs
Largs
Largs
(Scottish Gaelic: An Leargaidh Ghallda) is a town on the Firth of Clyde in North Ayrshire, Scotland, about 33 miles (53 km) from Glasgow. The original name means "the slopes" (An Leargaidh) in Scottish Gaelic. A popular seaside resort with a pier, the town markets itself on its historic links with the Vikings and an annual festival is held each year in early September. In 1263 it was the site of the Battle of Largs
Largs
between the Norwegian and the Scottish armies. The National Mòd has also been held here in the past.Contents1 History 2 Culture 3 Places of interest 4 Twin towns 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] Largs
Largs
evolved from the estates of North Cunninghame over which the Montgomeries of Skelmorlie
Skelmorlie
became temporal lords in the seventeenth century
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Corsehill
The old Barony and castle of Corsehill lay within the feudal Baillerie of Cunninghame, near Stewarton, now East Ayrshire, Scotland.Contents1 The Lands of Corsehill1.1 Old Corsehill Castle, Ravenscraig Castle and Corsehill House 1.2 Templehouse fortalice 1.3 The Baron-Court book 1.4 King's Kitchen2 Corsehill Castle and King Malcolm Canmore 3 Micro-history 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksThe Lands of Corsehill[edit]William Aiton's 1811 map showing Stewarton, Corsehill and the lands around.Godfrey de Ross was an early holder of the castle and lands of Corsehill, moving his seat here from the castle at Boarland (also 'Borland') or Dunlop hill. The De Ross family are now represented by the Earls of Glasgow. Andrew Cunningham, second son of William Cunningham, 4th Earl of Glencairn, was the first of the House of Corsehill in 1532.[1] In 1532 his father had granted to him the lands of Doura, Potterton, Little Robertland, and the two Corsehills
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Merks
The merk was a Scottish silver coin. Originally the same word as a money mark of silver, the merk was in circulation at the end of the 16th century and in the 17th century. It was originally valued at 13s 4d (exactly ​2⁄3 of a pound Scots, or about one English shilling), later raised to 14s Scots.[1] In addition to merks, half-merk and quarter-merk coins were produced with values of, respectively, 7s and 3s 6d, as well as a four-merk coin of 56s (£2 16s). The first issue weighed 103.8 grains (6.73 g) and was 50% silver and 50% base metals,[2] thus it contained 0.108125 troy ounces (3.3631 g) of silver, worth about £1.45 ($2.27) at August 2013 prices. "Markland" or "Merkland" was used to describe an amount of land in Scottish deeds and legal papers
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Holyrood Abbey
Holyrood Abbey
Abbey
is a ruined abbey of the Canons Regular
Canons Regular
in Edinburgh, Scotland. The abbey was founded in 1128 by King David I. During the 15th century, the abbey guesthouse was developed into a royal residence, and after the Scottish Reformation
Scottish Reformation
the Palace of Holyroodhouse was expanded further. The abbey church was used as a parish church until the 17th century, and has been ruined since the 18th century. The remaining walls of the abbey lie adjacent to the palace, at the eastern end of Edinburgh's Royal Mile
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Charles I Of Great Britain
Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649)[a] was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. Charles was born into the House of Stuart as the second son of King James VI of Scotland, but after his father inherited the English throne in 1603, he moved to England, where he spent much of the rest of his life. He became heir apparent to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland on the death of his elder brother, Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales, in 1612. An unsuccessful and unpopular attempt to marry him to the Spanish Habsburg princess Maria Anna culminated in an eight-month visit to Spain in 1623 that demonstrated the futility of the marriage negotiations. Two years later, he married the Bourbon princess Henrietta Maria of France instead. After his succession, Charles quarrelled with the Parliament of England, which sought to curb his royal prerogative
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