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Egalitarian Dialogue
Egalitarian dialogue
Egalitarian dialogue
is a dialogue in which contributions are considered according to the validity of their reasoning, instead of according to the status or position of power of those who make them. Although previously used widely in the social sciences and in reference to the Bakhtinian philosophy of dialogue,[1] it was first systematically applied to dialogical education by Ramón Flecha in his 2000 work Sharing Words. Theory and Practice of Dialogic Learning. Egalitarian dialogue
Egalitarian dialogue
is one of the seven principles of dialogic learning (Flecha, 2000), the others being cultural intelligence, equality of differences, creation of meaning, instrumental dimension, solidarity, and transformation
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Zone Of Proximal Development
The zone of proximal development, often abbreviated as ZPD, is the difference between what a learner can do without help, and what they can't do.[1] The concept was introduced, but not fully developed, by psychologist Lev Vygotsky
Lev Vygotsky
(1896–1934) during the last ten years of his life.[2] Vygotsky stated that a child follows an adult's example and gradually develops the ability to do certain tasks without help.[3] Vygotsky and some other educators believe that the role of education is to give children experiences that are within their zones of proximal development, thereby encouraging and advancing their individual learning such a
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Shimer College
Shimer College
College
(pronounced /ˈʃaɪmər/ ( listen) SHY-mər) was an American Great Books
Great Books
college located initially in Mount Carroll, then Waukegan and finally Chicago, Illinois. Founded in 1853 as the Mt. Carroll Seminary in Mount Carroll, Illinois, the school became affiliated with the University
University
of Chicago
Chicago
and was renamed the Frances Shimer
Frances Shimer
Academy in 1896. It was renamed Shimer College
College
in 1950, when it began offering a four-year curriculum based on the Hutchins Plan of the University
University
of Chicago. Although the University
University
of Chicago parted with Shimer (and the Hutchins Plan) in 1958, Shimer continued to use a version of that curriculum
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Social Solidarity
Solidarity
Solidarity
is unity (as of a group or class) which produces or is based on unities of interests, objectives, standards, and sympathies.[1][2] It refers to the ties in a society that bind people together as one. The term is generally employed in sociology and the other social sciences as well as in philosophy or in Catholic social teaching.[3] In addition, solidarity is a core concept in Christian democracy political ideology.[4] What forms the basis of solidarity varies between societies. In simple societies it may be mainly based on kinship and shared values
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Communicative Rationality
Communicative rationality, or communicative reason (German: kommunikative Rationalität), is a theory or set of theories which describes human rationality as a necessary outcome of successful communication. In particular, it is tied to the philosophy of Karl-Otto Apel, Jürgen Habermas, and their program of universal pragmatics, along with its related theories such as those on discourse ethics and rational reconstruction. This view of reason is concerned with clarifying the norms and procedures by which agreement can be reached, and is therefore a view of reason as a form of public justification. According to the theory of communicative rationality, the potential for certain kinds of reason is inherent in communication itself. Building from this, Habermas has tried to formalize that potential in explicit terms
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Elitism
Elitism is the belief or attitude that individuals who form an elite — a select group of people with a certain ancestry, intrinsic quality, high intellect, wealth, special skills, or experience — are more likely to be constructive to society as a whole, and therefore deserve influence or authority greater than that of others. In the United States, the term elitism often refers to the concentration of power in the Northeast Corridor and on the West Coast, where the typical American elite resides – lawyers, doctors, high-level civil servants (such as White House
White House
aides), businesspeople, university lecturers, entrepreneurs, and financial advisors in the quaternary sector, often in established technological or political catchments of their higher education alma mater.[1] Alternatively, the term elitism may be used to describe a situation in which power is concentrated in the hands of a limited number of people
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Intersubjectivity
Intersubjectivity, in philosophy, psychology, sociology, and anthropology, is the psychological relation between people. It is usually used in contrast to solipsistic individual experience, emphasizing our inherently social being.Contents1 Definition 2 In philosophy2.1 Phenomenology3 In psychology 4 In child development4.1 Across cultures5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading7.1 Psychoanalysis 7.2 Philosophy8 External linksDefinition[edit] "Intersubjectivity" is a term coined by social scientists as a short-hand description for a variety of human interactions. For example, social psychologists Alex Gillespie and Flora Cornish list at least six definitions of intersubjectivity (and other disciplines have additional definitions).[1] It is important to recognize that "intersubjectivity" has no inherent existence other than as a noun. "Intersubjectivity" has been used as a term of social science jargon to refer to agreement
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Habermas
Habermas is a surname. Notable people with the surname include: Jürgen Habermas
Jürgen Habermas
(born 1929), German sociologist and philosopher Rebekka Habermas
Rebekka Habermas
(born 1959), German historian Gary Habermas (born 1950), American philosophical theologianThis page lists people with the surname Habermas
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Lifeworld
Lifeworld (German: Lebenswelt) may be conceived as a universe of what is self-evident or given,[1] a world that subjects may experience together.[2] For Edmund Husserl, the lifeworld is the fundamental for all epistemological enquiries. The concept has its origin in biology and cultural Protestantism.[3][4] The lifeworld concept is used in philosophy and in some social sciences, particularly sociology and anthropology. The concept emphasizes a state of affairs in which the world is experienced, the world is lived (German erlebt)
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Meaning-making
In psychology, meaning-making is the process of how persons construe, understand, or make sense of life events, relationships, and the self.[1] Through meaning-making, persons are "retaining, reaffirming, revising, or replacing elements of their orienting system to develop more nuanced, complex and useful systems".[2] The term is widely used in constructivist approaches to counseling psychology and psychotherapy,[3] especially during bereavement in which persons attribute some sort of meaning to an experienced death or loss.[4] The term is also used in educational psychology.[5] In a broader sense, meaning-making is the main research object of semiotics.Contents1 History 2 Learning as meaning-making 3 In bereavement3.1 Family
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Paulo Freire
Paulo Reglus Neves Freire (/ˈfrɛəri/, Portuguese: [ˈpawlu ˈfɾeiɾi]; September 19, 1921 – May 2, 1997) was a Brazilian educator and philosopher who was a leading advocate of critical pedagogy. He is best known for his influential work, Pedagogy
Pedagogy
of the Oppressed, considered to be one of the foundational texts of the critical pedagogy movement.[1][2][3]Contents1 Biography 2 Theoretical contributions2.1 Banking model of education 2.2 Culture of silence3 Global impact3.1 Recognition4 Bibliography 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksBiography[edit] Freire was born September 19, 1921 to a middle-class family in Recife, Brazil. Freire became familiar with poverty and hunger during the Great Depression of the 1930s. In 1931, the family moved to the less expensive city of Jaboatão dos Guararapes
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Egalitarianism
Egalitarianism (from French égal, meaning 'equal') – or equalitarianism[1][2] – is a school of thought that prioritizes equality for all people.[3] According to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Egalitarian doctrines maintain that all humans are equal in fundamental worth or social status.[4] According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, the term has two distinct definitions in modern English:[5] either as a political doctrine that all people should be treated as equals and have the same political, economic, social and civil rights;[6] or as a social philosophy advocating the removal of economic inequalities among people, economic egalitarianism, or the decentralization of power
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Cultural Intelligence
Cultural intelligence or cultural quotient (CQ) is a term used in business, education, government and academic research. Cultural intelligence can be understood as the capability to relate and work effectively across cultures. Originally, the term cultural intelligence and the abbreviation "CQ" was developed by the research done by Soon Ang and Linn Van Dyne as a researched-based way of measuring and predicting intercultural performance. The term is relatively recent: early definitions and studies of the concepts were given by P. Christopher Earley and Soon Ang in the book Cultural Intelligence: Individual Interactions Across Cultures (2003) and more fully developed later by David Livermore in the book, Leading with Cultural Intelligence. The concept is related to that of cross-cultural competence.[1] but goes beyond that to actually look at intercultural capabilities as a form of intelligence that can be measured and developed
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Ramón Flecha
Ramón Flecha is a professor of sociology at the University of Barcelona, Doctor Honoris Causa from West University of Timişoara,[1] and a renowned researcher in social sciences in Europe. Alain Touraine commented about Flecha's contribution:[2]At times, as Ramón Flecha demonstrates, knowledge goes from bottom to top, when individuals without degrees produce and invent cultural analyses based on their own experience. Ulrich Beck
Ulrich Beck
has said that Flecha's book Contemporary Sociological Theory[3]combines rigorous research with facts, including the intention for a dialogical utopia. But this broad intention is presented in the book, joining theory with critique and empirical research with praxis, in such a charming way that it grabs its readers and captures them under its spell.Flecha’s investigations stand out[according to whom?] for their joint impact in the scientific, political and social domains
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Bakhtin
Mikhail Mikhailovich Bakhtin (/bɑːkˈtiːn, bɑːx-/;[2] Russian: Михаи́л Миха́йлович Бахти́н, pronounced [mʲɪxɐˈil mʲɪˈxajləvʲɪtɕ bɐxˈtʲin]; 16 November [O.S. 4 November] 1895 – 7 March[3] 1975) was a Russian philosopher, literary critic, semiotician[4] and scholar who worked on literary theory, ethics, and the philosophy of language. His writings, on a variety of subjects, inspired scholars working in a number of different traditions (Marxism, semiotics, structuralism, religious criticism) and in disciplines as diverse as literary criticism, history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology and psychology
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