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Edwin Maxwell Fry
Edwin Maxwell Fry, CBE, RA, FRIBA, FRTPI, known as Maxwell Fry
Maxwell Fry
(2 August 1899 – 3 September 1987), was an English modernist architect, writer and painter. Originally trained in the neo-classical style of architecture, Fry grew to favour the new modernist style, and practised with eminent colleagues including Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier
Le Corbusier
and Pierre Jeanneret. Fry was a major influence on a generation of young architects. Among the younger colleagues with whom he worked was Denys Lasdun. In the 1940s Fry designed buildings for West African countries that were then part of the British Empire, including Ghana and Nigeria. In the 1950s he and his wife, the architect Jane Drew, worked for three years on an ambitious development to create a new capital city of Punjab at Chandigarh. Fry's works in Britain range from railway stations to private houses to large corporate headquarters
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Kenneth Dike
Kenneth Onwuka Dike (17 December 1917 – 26 October 1983[1]) was an Igbo Nigerian
Nigerian
historian and the first Nigerian
Nigerian
Vice-Chancellor of the nation's premier college, the University of Ibadan.[2][3] During the Nigerian
Nigerian
civil war, he moved to Harvard University, Boston. He was a founder of the Ibadan School that dominated the writing of the History of Nigeria until the 1970s. He is credited with "having played the leading role in creating a generation of African historians who could interpret their own history without being influenced by Eurocentric approaches."[4] Career[edit] Born in Awka, eastern Nigeria, Kenneth Onwuka Dike was educated in West Africa, England and Scotland
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Gas Light And Coke Company
The Gas Light and Coke Company
Gas Light and Coke Company
(also known as the Westminster
Westminster
Gas Light and Coke Company, and the Chartered Gas Light and Coke Company),[1] was a company that made and supplied coal gas and coke. The headquarters of the company were located on Horseferry Road
Horseferry Road
in Westminster, London
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Congrès Internationaux D'Architecture Moderne
The Congrès internationaux d'architecture moderne (CIAM), or International Congresses of Modern Architecture, was an organization founded in 1928 and disbanded in 1959, responsible for a series of events and congresses arranged across Europe by the most prominent architects of the time, with the objective of spreading the principles of the Modern Movement focusing in all the main domains of architecture (such as landscape, urbanism, industrial design, and many others).Contents1 Formation and membership 2 Influence 3 CIRPAC 4 Conferences 5 Bibliography 6 References 7 See alsoFormation and membership[edit] The International Congresses of Modern Architecture
Modern Architecture
(CIAM) was founded in June 1928, at the Chateau de la Sarraz in Switzerland, by a group of 28 European architects organized by Le Corbusier, Hélène de Mandrot (owner of the castle), and Sigfried Giedion (the first secretary-general)
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MARS Group
The Modern Architectural Research Group, or MARS Group, was a British architectural think tank founded in 1933 by several prominent architects and architectural critics of the time involved in the British modernist movement. The MARS Group came after several previous but unsuccessful attempts at creating an organization to support modernist architects in Britain such as those that had been formed on continental Europe, like the Union des Artistes Modernes in France. The group first formed when Sigfried Giedion of the Congrès International d' Architecture
Architecture
Moderne asked Morton Shand
Morton Shand
to assemble a group that would represent Britain at their events. Shand, along with Wells Coates, chose Maxwell Fry
Maxwell Fry
and F. R. S. Yorke as the founding members
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John Nash (architect)
John Nash (18 January 1752 – 13 May 1835) was an English architect responsible for much of the layout of Regency London under the patronage of the Prince Regent, and during his reign as George IV. Nash was also a pioneer in the use of the Picturesque
Picturesque
in architecture. His best-known buildings are the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, and Buckingham Palace
Buckingham Palace
(though the facade facing The Mall is an early 20th-century remodelling by Aston Webb
Aston Webb
of an 1850s wing by Edward Blore, and thus is not Nash's work). Many of his buildings were built by the property developer James Burton, who also lent him financial assistance when he encountered financial problems during his projects on Regent Street
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Carlton House Terrace
Carlton House
Carlton House
Terrace is a street in the St James's
St James's
district of the City of Westminster
City of Westminster
in London. Its principal architectural feature is a pair of terraces of white stucco-faced houses on the south side of the street overlooking St. James's Park
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Bauhaus
Staatliches Bauhaus
Bauhaus
(German: [ˈʃtaːtlɪçəs ˈbaʊˌhaʊs] ( listen)), commonly known simply as Bauhaus, was a German art school operational from 1919 to 1933 that combined crafts and the fine arts, and was famous for the approach to design that it publicised and taught.[1] The Bauhaus
Bauhaus
was founded by Walter Gropius
Walter Gropius
in Weimar. The German term Bauhaus—literally "construction house"—was understood as meaning "School of Building", but in spite of its name and the fact that its founder was an architect, the Bauhaus
Bauhaus
did not have an architecture department during its first years of existence. Nonetheless, it was founded with the idea of creating a "total" work of art (Gesamtkunstwerk) in which all arts, including architecture, would eventually be brought together
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Impington
Histon and Impington
Histon and Impington
are villages in the County of Cambridgeshire, England. They are situated just north of Cambridge
Cambridge
with the main bulk of the settlements being separated from the city by the A14 road (England). Over the years the two villages have grown and entwined together, to such an extent that many villagers today do not know where one ends and the other begins. They contain a combined total of six pubs. They have nursery, infants', junior and secondary schools
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Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
(/ˈkeɪmbrɪdʒʃər/ or /-ʃɪər/; abbreviated Cambs.),[3] is an East Anglian county in England, bordering Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
to the north, Norfolk
Norfolk
to the north-east, Suffolk
Suffolk
to the east, Essex
Essex
and Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
to the south, and Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
and Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
to the west. The city of Cambridge
Cambridge
is the county town
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Henry Moore
Henry Spencer Moore OM CH FBA (30 July 1898 – 31 August 1986) was an English artist. He is best known for his semi-abstract monumental bronze sculptures which are located around the world as public works of art. As well as sculpture, Moore produced many drawings, including a series depicting Londoners sheltering from the Blitz during the Second World War, along with other graphic works on paper. His forms are usually abstractions of the human figure, typically depicting mother-and-child or reclining figures. Moore's works are usually suggestive of the female body, apart from a phase in the 1950s when he sculpted family groups. His forms are generally pierced or contain hollow spaces. Many interpreters liken the undulating form of his reclining figures to the landscape and hills of his birthplace, Yorkshire. Moore was born in Castleford, the son of a coal miner
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The Peckham Experiment
The Peckham
Peckham
Experiment took place between 1926 and 1950, initially generated by rising public concern over the health of the working class and an increasing interest in preventative social medicine.Contents1 Commencement 2 Subjects 3 Closure 4 The 21st century 5 References in literature 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksCommencement[edit] George Scott Williamson (1884–1953) and Innes Hope Pearse (1889–1978), two doctors who later married, opened the Pioneer Health Centre in an area – Peckham, south east London, which was chosen because "this populace roughly represents a cross-sect
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Peckham
Peckham
Peckham
(/ˈpɛkəm/) is a district of south-east London, England, 3.5 miles (5.6 km) south-east of Charing Cross.[1] At the 2001 Census the Peckham
Peckham
ward of the
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Grand Union Canal
The Grand Union Canal
Grand Union Canal
in England
England
is part of the British canal system. Its main line starts in London and ends in Birmingham, stretchin
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Wells Coates
Wells Wintemute Coates OBE (December 17, 1895 – June 17, 1958) was an architect, designer and writer
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Charles Kearley
Charles Hudson Kearley (11 June 1904–1989), was an English property developer and art collector.Contents1 Background and education 2 Career 3 War 4 Interests 5 Art Collection 6 ReferencesBackground and education[edit] Kearley was educated at Gresham's School, Norfolk. His father, C.F. Kearley, was the brother of Hudson Ewbanke Kearley, 1st Viscount Devonport, and head of the firm of Kearley & Tonge, tea importers and jam manufacturers. C.F. Kearley had also gone into business as a builder and property developer, and his son Charles joined the firm after leaving school. Career[edit] Kearley's influence appeared in the progressive buildings erected by the family firm. One important project was Fairacres at Roehampton, a group of modern flats. In 1936, Kearley asked the architect and artist Raymond Myerscough-Walker (1908–1984) to make drawings of a design by Minoprio & Spenceley
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