HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Edwardian Era
The Edwardian era
Edwardian era
or Edwardian period of British history covers the brief reign of King Edward VII, 1901 to 1910, and is sometimes extended in both directions to capture long-term trends from the 1890s to the First World War. The death of Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
in January 1901 marked the end of the Victorian era. The new king Edward VII
Edward VII
was already the leader of a fashionable elite that set a style influenced by the art and fashions of continental Europe
[...More...]

"Edwardian Era" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edward I Of England
Edward
Edward
I (17/18 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots (Latin: Malleus Scotorum), was King of England
King of England
from 1272 to 1307. Before his accession to the throne, he was commonly referred to as The Lord Edward.[1] He spent much of his reign reforming royal administration and common law. Through an extensive legal inquiry, Edward
Edward
investigated the tenure of various feudal liberties, while the law was reformed through a series of statutes regulating criminal and property law. Increasingly, however, Edward's attention was drawn towards military affairs. As the first son of Henry III, Edward
Edward
was involved early in the political intrigues of his father's reign, which included an outright rebellion by the English barons. In 1259, he briefly sided with a baronial reform movement, supporting the Provisions of Oxford
[...More...]

"Edward I Of England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Conservative Party (UK)
The Conservative Party, officially the Conservative and Unionist Party,[11] is a centre-right political party in the United Kingdom. It is currently the governing party, having been so since the 2010 general election, where a coalition government with the Liberal Democrats was formed. In 2015, the Conservatives led by David Cameron won a surprise majority and formed the first Conservative majority government since 1992.[12] However, the 2017 snap election on Thursday 8 June resulted in a hung parliament, and the party lost its parliamentary majority.[13] It is reliant on the support of a Northern Irish political party, the Democratic Unionist Party
Democratic Unionist Party
(DUP), in order to command a majority in the House of Commons through a confidence-and-supply deal. The party leader, Theresa May,[14] has served as both Leader of the Conservative Party and Prime Minister since 13 July 2016
[...More...]

"Conservative Party (UK)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Queen Victoria
Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom
Queen of the United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. On 1 May 1876, she adopted the additional title of Empress of India. Victoria was the daughter of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, the fourth son of King George III. Both the Duke of Kent and King George III
King George III
died in 1820, and Victoria was raised under close supervision by her German-born mother, Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. She inherited the throne at the age of 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died, leaving no surviving legitimate children. The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
was already an established constitutional monarchy, in which the sovereign held relatively little direct political power
[...More...]

"Queen Victoria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Samuel Hynes
Samuel Lynn Hynes (born August 29, 1924) is an author. He won a Robert F. Kennedy Book Award for The Soldiers' Tale in 1998. Samuel Hynes was born in Chicago. He attended the University of Minnesota and Columbia University.[1] Hynes served as a Marine Corps pilot from 1943 until 1946 and in 1952 and 1953. He received the Distinguished Flying Cross.[1] He discussed his experiences as a pilot in the documentary series The War by Ken Burns (2007).[2] Burns interviewed Hynes again for The Vietnam War (2017), where Hynes discussed his experiences at Northwestern University during its anti-Vietnam War protests. Hynes is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature emeritus at Princeton University
[...More...]

"Samuel Hynes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United Kingdom General Election, 1906
Henry Campbell-Bannerman LiberalAppointed Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman LiberalThe 1906 United Kingdom
United Kingdom
general election was held from 12 January to 8 February 1906. The Liberals, led by Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman, won a landslide majority at the election. The Conservatives led by Arthur Balfour, who had been in government until the month before the election, lost more than half their seats, including party leader Balfour's own seat in Manchester East, leaving them with their lowest ever number of seats
[...More...]

"United Kingdom General Election, 1906" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

British Empire
The British Empire
Empire
comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states. It originated with the overseas possessions and trading posts established by England
England
between the late 16th and early 18th centuries. At its height, it was the largest empire in history and, for over a century, was the foremost global power.[1] By 1913, the British Empire
Empire
held sway over 412 million people, 7001230000000000000♠23% of the world population at the time,[2] and by 1920, it covered 35,500,000 km2 (13,700,000 sq mi),[3] 7001240000000000000♠24% of the Earth's total land area.[4] As a result, its political, legal, linguistic and cultural legacy is widespread
[...More...]

"British Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Great War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
[...More...]

"Great War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lawrence James
Edwin James Lawrence[1] (born 26 May 1943, Bath, England), most commonly known as Lawrence James, is an English historian and writer.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] James graduated with a BA in English & History from the University of York in 1966,[2][3] and subsequently undertook a research degree at Merton College, Oxford.[2] Following a career as a teacher, James became a full-time writer in 1985.[2] James has written several works of popular history about the British Empire, and has contributed pieces for Daily Mail, The Times
The Times
and the Literary Review.[4] His wife Mary James was headmis
[...More...]

"Lawrence James" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Working-class
The working class (also labouring class and proletariat) are the people employed for wages, especially in manual-labour occupations and industrial work.[1] Working-class occupations include blue-collar jobs, some white-collar jobs, and most pink-collar jobs
[...More...]

"Working-class" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Trade Unions
A trade union or trades union, also called a labour union (Canada) or labor union (US), is an organization of workers who have come together to achieve common goals; such as protecting the integrity of its trade, improving safety standards, and attaining better wages, benefits (such as vacation, health care, and retirement), and working conditions through the increased bargaining power wielded by the creation of a monopoly of the workers.[1] The trade union, through its leadership, bargains with the employer on behalf of union members (rank and file members) and negotiates labour contracts (collective bargaining) with employers
[...More...]

"Trade Unions" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Labour Movement
The labour movement or labor movement[1] consists of two main wings, the trade union movement (British English) or labor union movement (American English), also called trade unionism or labor unionism[a] on the one hand, and the political labour movement on the other.The trade union movement consists of the collective organisation of working people developed to represent and campaign for better working conditions and treatment from their employers and, by the implementation of labour and employment laws, from their governments. The standard unit of organisation is the trade union.The political labour movement in many countries includes a political party that represents the interests of employees, often known as a "labour party" or "workers' party"
[...More...]

"Labour Movement" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

History Of The Conservative Party (UK)
The Conservative Party (also known as Tories) is the oldest political party in the United Kingdom[1] and arguably the world.[2] The current party was first organized in the 1830s and the name "Conservative" was officially adopted, but the party is still often referred to as the Tory party (not least because newspaper editors find it a convenient shorthand when space is limited). The Tories had been a coalition that more often than not formed the government from 1760 until the Reform Act 1832. Modernizing reformers said the traditionalistic party of "Throne, Altar and Cottage" was obsolete, but in the face of an expanding electorate 1830s–1860s it held its strength among royalists, devout Anglicans and landlords and their tenants.[3] Widening of the franchise in the 19th century led the party to popularise its approach, especially under Benjamin Disraeli, whose Reform Act of 1867 greatly increased the electorate
[...More...]

"History Of The Conservative Party (UK)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

1906 UK General Election
Henry Campbell-Bannerman LiberalAppointed Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman LiberalThe 1906 United Kingdom general election was held from 12 January to 8 February 1906. The Liberals, led by Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman, won a landslide majority at the election. The Conservatives led by Arthur Balfour, who had been in government until the month before the election, lost more than half their seats, including party leader Balfour's own seat in Manchester East, leaving them with their lowest ever number of seats
[...More...]

"1906 UK General Election" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Imperialism
Imperialism
Imperialism
is an action that involves a nation extending its power by the acquisition of inhabited territory. It may also include the exploitation of these territories, an action that is linked to colonialism. Colonialism
Colonialism
is generally regarded as an expression of imperialism. It is different from New Imperialism, as the term imperialism is usually applied to the colonization of the Americas between the 15th and 19th centuries, as opposed to the expansion of Western Powers (and Japan) during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. However, both are examples of imperialism.Contents1 Etymology and usage 2 Colonialism
Colonialism
vs
[...More...]

"Imperialism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Periodization
Periodization
Periodization
is the process or study of categorizing the past into discrete, quantified named blocks of time[1] in order to facilitate the study and analysis of history. This results in descriptive abstractions that provide convenient terms for periods of time with relatively stable characteristics. However, determining the precise beginning and ending to any "period" is often arbitrary. It has changed over time in history. To the extent that history is continuous and ungeneralizable, all systems of periodization are more or less arbitrary
[...More...]

"Periodization" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.