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Edward N. Zalta
Edward N. Zalta[a] (born March 16, 1952) is a senior research scholar at the Center for the Study of Language and Information. He received his PhD in philosophy from the University of Massachusetts Amherst
University of Massachusetts Amherst
in 1980.[3] Zalta has taught courses at Stanford University, Rice University, the University of Salzburg, and the University of Auckland. Zalta is also the Principal Editor of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.[4]Contents1 Research 2 Notes 3 References3.1 Citations 3.2 Works cited4 External linksResearch[edit]Play mediaEdward N. Zalta. "The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Issues Faced by Academic Reference Works That May Be of Interest to Wikipedians", Wikimania 2015, Mexico CityZalta's most notable philosophical position is descended from the position of Alexius Meinong
Alexius Meinong
and Ernst Mally,[5] who suggested that there are many non-existent objects
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University Of Massachusetts Amherst
The University of Massachusetts
University of Massachusetts
Amherst (abbreviated UMass Amherst and colloquially referred to as UMass or Massachusetts) is a public research and land-grant university in Amherst, Massachusetts, United States, and the flagship campus of the University of Massachusetts system. With approximately 1,300 faculty members and more than 29,000 students, UMass Amherst is the largest public university in New England[10] and is tied for 27th best public university in the nation.[11] The university offers bachelor's degrees, master's degrees, and doctoral degrees in 111 undergraduate, 75 master's and 47 doctoral programs in nine schools and colleges.[5] The main campus is situated north of downtown Amherst. In a 2009 article for MSN.com, Amherst was ranked first in Best College Towns in the United States.[12] In 2012, U.S. News and World Report
U.S

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Editing
Editing
Editing
is the process of selecting and preparing written, visual, audible, and film media used to convey information. The editing process can involve correction, condensation, organization, and many other modifications performed with an intention of producing a correct, consistent, accurate and complete work.[1] The editing process often begins with the author's idea for the work itself, continuing as a collaboration between the author and the editor as the work is created. As such, editing can involve creative skills, human relations and a precise set of methods.[2][3]Editors work on producing an issue of Bild, West Berlin, 1977. Previous front pages are affixed to the wall behind them.There are various editorial positions in publishing. Typically, one finds editorial assistants reporting to the senior-level editorial staff and directors who report to senior executive editors
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University Of Salzburg
The University of Salzburg, also known as the Paris Lodron University of Salzburg
Salzburg
(German: Paris-Lodron-Universität Salzburg, PLUS), named after its founder, Prince-Archbishop Paris Lodron, is a public university located in Salzburg
Salzburg
city, Austria. It is divided into four faculties:Catholic Theology Law Cultural and Social Sciences Natural SciencesEstablished in 1622, the university was closed in 1810 and re-established in 1962. Today, it has around 18,000 students and 2,800 employees and is the largest educational institution in Salzburg state.Contents1 Benedictine University 2 University of Salzburg 3 Locations 4 Alumni 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBenedictine University[edit] On 23 July 1622 Archbishop Paris Lodron appointed the scholar Albert Keuslin first rector of the Benedictine university
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Rice University
Rice University, officially William Marsh Rice University, is a private research university located on a 295-acre campus in Houston, Texas, United States. The university is situated near the Houston Museum District and is adjacent to the Texas
Texas
Medical Center. Rice is generally considered the foremost university and the most selective institution of higher education in the state of Texas.[10][11][12] Opened in 1912 after the murder of its namesake William Marsh Rice, Rice is now a research university with an undergraduate focus
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Stanford University
Stanford University
University
(officially Leland Stanford
Leland Stanford
Junior University,[11] colloquially the Farm) is a private research university in Stanford, California. Because of its academic strength, wealth, and proximity to Silicon Valley, Stanford is often cited as one of the world's most prestigious universities.[12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19] The university was founded in 1885 by Leland and Jane Stanford
Jane Stanford
in memory of their only child, Leland Stanford
Leland Stanford
Jr., who had died of typhoid fever at age 15 the previous year. Stanford was a former Governor of California
California
and U.S. Senator; he made his fortune as a railroad tycoon
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Philosophy
Philosophy
Philosophy
(from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom"[1][2][3][4]) is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.[5][6] The term was probably coined by Pythagoras
Pythagoras
(c. 570–495 BCE)
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Center For The Study Of Language And Information
Information
Information
is any entity or form that resolves uncertainty or provides the answer to a question of some kind. It is thus related to data and knowledge, as data represents values attributed to parameters, and knowledge signifies understanding of real things or abstract concepts.[1] As it regards data, the information's existence is not necessarily coupled to an observer (it exists beyond an event horizon, for example), while in the case of knowledge, the information requires a cognitive observer.[citation needed] Information
Information
is conveyed either as the content of a message or through direct or indirect observation
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Wikimania 2015
Wikimania
Wikimania
is the official annual conference of the Wikimedia Foundation
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Gottlob Frege
Friedrich Ludwig Gottlob Frege
Gottlob Frege
(/ˈfreɪɡə/;[10] German: [ˈɡɔtloːp ˈfreːɡə]; 8 November 1848 – 26 July 1925) was a German philosopher, logician, and mathematician. He is understood by many to be the father of analytic philosophy, concentrating on the philosophy of language and mathematics. Though largely ignored during his lifetime, Giuseppe Peano
Giuseppe Peano
(1858–1932) and Bertrand Russell (1872–1970) introduced his work to later generations of logicians and philosophers. His contributions include the development of modern logic in the Begriffsschrift
Begriffsschrift
and work in the foundations of mathematics. His book the Foundations of Arithmetic
Foundations of Arithmetic
is the seminal text of the logicist project, and is cited by Michael Dummett
Michael Dummett
as where to pinpoint the linguistic turn
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20th-century Philosophy
20th-century philosophy
20th-century philosophy
saw the development of a number of new philosophical schools— including logical positivism, analytic philosophy, phenomenology, existentialism, and poststructuralism. In terms of the eras of philosophy, it is usually labelled as contemporary philosophy (succeeding modern philosophy, which runs roughly from the time of Descartes until the twentieth-century). As with other academic disciplines, philosophy increasingly became professionalized in the twentieth century, and a split emerged between philosophers who considered themselves part of either the "analytic" or "continental" traditions
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Intentionality
Intentionality is a philosophical concept and is defined by the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Philosophy
as "the power of minds to be about, to represent, or to stand for, things, properties and states of affairs".[1] The once obsolete term dates from medieval scholastic philosophy, but in more recent times it has been resurrected by Franz Brentano and adopted by Edmund Husserl. The earliest theory of intentionality is associated with St
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Philosophy Of Logic
Following the developments in formal logic with symbolic logic in the late nineteenth century and mathematical logic in the twentieth, topics traditionally treated by logic not being part of formal logic have tended to be termed either philosophy of logic or philosophical logic if no longer simply logic. Compared to the history of logic the demarcation between philosophy of logic and philosophical logic is of recent coinage and not always entirely clear. Characterisations include Philosophy
Philosophy
of logic is the area of philosophy devoted to examining the scope and nature of logic.[1] Philosophy
Philosophy
of logic is the investigation, critical analysis and intellectual reflection on issues arising in logic
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Philosophy Of Language
Philosophy
Philosophy
of language explores the relationship between language and reality, in particular, philosophy of language studies issues that cannot be addressed by other fields, like linguistics, or psychology. Major topics in philosophy of language include the nature of meaning, intentionality, reference, the constitution of sentences, concepts, learning, and thought. The topic that has received the most attention in philosophy of language has been the nature of meaning, to explain what "meaning" is, and what we mean when we talk about meaning. Within this area, issues include: the nature of synonymy, the origins of meaning itself, and our apprehension of meaning
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Doctoral Advisor
A doctoral advisor (also dissertation director or dissertation advisor) is a member of a university faculty whose role is to guide graduate students who are candidates for a doctorate, helping them select coursework, as well as shaping, refining and directing the students' choice of sub-discipline in which they will be examined or on which they will write a dissertation.[1] Students generally choose advisors based on their areas of interest within their discipline, their desire to work closely with particular graduate faculty, and the willingness and availability of those faculty to work with them. In some countries, the student's advisor serves as the chair of the doctoral examination or dissertation committees. In some cases, though, the person who serves those roles may be different from the faculty member who has most closely advised the student
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