HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Edward Lhuyd
Edward Lhuyd
Edward Lhuyd
(pronounced [ˈɬʊɨd]; occasionally written as Llwyd in recent times, in accordance with Modern Welsh orthography) (1660 – 30 June 1709) was a Welsh naturalist, botanist, linguist, geographer and antiquary. He is also known by the Latinized form of his name, Eduardus Luidius.Contents1 Life 2 Pioneering linguist 3 Legacy 4 Further reading 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Lhuyd was born in Loppington, Shropshire, the illegitimate son of Edward Lloyd of Llanforda, Oswestry
Oswestry
and Bridget Pryse of Llansantffraid, near Talybont, Cardiganshire, and was a pupil and later a master at Oswestry
Oswestry
Grammar School. His family belonged to the gentry of south-west Wales; though well-established, his family was not well-off, and his father experimented with agriculture and industry in a manner that brought him into contact with the new science of the day
[...More...]

"Edward Lhuyd" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aberystwyth
Aberystwyth
Aberystwyth
(Mouth of the Ystwyth, /ˌæbəˈrɪstwɪθ/, Welsh: [abɛɾˈəstʊɨθ]) is a historic market town, administrative centre, and holiday resort within Ceredigion, West Wales, often colloquially known as Aber. It is located near the confluence of the rivers Ystwyth and Rheidol. Historically part of Cardiganshire, since the late 19th century, Aberystwyth
Aberystwyth
has also been a major Welsh educational centre, with the establishment of a university college there in 1872. At the 2001 census, the town's population was 15,935;[3] it was reduced to 13,040 at the 2011 Census
[...More...]

"Aberystwyth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Honoris Causa
An honorary degree,[1] in Latin
Latin
a degree honoris causa ("for the sake of the honor") or ad honorem ("to the honor"), is an academic degree for which a university (or other degree-awarding institution) has waived the usual requirements, such as matriculation, residence, a dissertation and the passing of comprehensive examinations. The degree is typically a doctorate or, less commonly, a master's degree, and may be awarded to someone who has no prior connection with the academic institution[2] or no previous postsecondary education. An example of identifying a recipient of this award is as follows: Doctorate
Doctorate
in Business Administration (Hon
[...More...]

"Honoris Causa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen); Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain
Great Britain
to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland
Ireland
is the third-largest island in Europe. Politically, Ireland
Ireland
is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the population of Ireland
Ireland
was about 6.6 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe
Europe
after Great Britain
[...More...]

"Ireland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Brittany
Brittany
Brittany
(/ˈbrɪtəni/; French: Bretagne [bʁətaɲ] ( listen); Breton: Breizh, pronounced [bʁɛjs] or [bʁɛχ];[1] Gallo: Bertaèyn, pronounced [bəʁtaɛɲ]) is a cultural region in the northwest of France, covering the western part of what was known as Armorica
[...More...]

"Brittany" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Isle Of Man
The Isle of Man
Isle of Man
(Manx: Ellan Vannin [ˈɛlʲən ˈvanɪn]), also known simply as Mann (/mæn/; Manx: Mannin [ˈmanɪn]), is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
between the islands of Great Britain and Ireland. The head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who holds the title of Lord of Mann
Lord of Mann
and is represented by a Lieutenant Governor. Defence is the responsibility of the United Kingdom. Ranked by the World Bank
World Bank
as the 5th richest nation in the world by GDP per capita,[6] the largest sectors are insurance and eGaming with 17% of GNP each, followed by ICT and banking with 9% each.[7] The island has been inhabited since before 6500 BC. Gaelic cultural influence began in the 5th century and the Manx language, a branch of the Gaelic languages, emerged
[...More...]

"Isle Of Man" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Isaac Newton
Sir Isaac Newton
Isaac Newton
PRS (/ˈnjuːtən/;[6] 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1726/27[1]) was an English mathematician, astronomer, theologian, author and physicist (described in his own day as a "natural philosopher") who is widely recognised as one of the most influential scientists of all time, and a key figure in the scientific revolution. His book Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica ("Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy"), first published in 1687, laid the foundations of classical mechanics. Newton also made pathbreaking contributions to optics, and he shares credit with Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
for developing the infinitesimal calculus. Newton's Principia formulated the laws of motion and universal gravitation that dominated scientists' view of the physical universe for the next three centuries
[...More...]

"Isaac Newton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fossil
A fossil (from Classical Latin
Latin
fossilis; literally, "obtained by digging")[1] is any preserved remains, impression, or trace of any once-living thing from a past geological age. Examples include bones, shells, exoskeletons, stone imprints of animals or microbes, hair, petrified wood, oil, coal, and DNA
DNA
remnants. The totality of fossils is known as the fossil record. Paleontology
Paleontology
is the study of fossils: their age, method of formation, and evolutionary significance. Specimens are usually considered to be fossils if they are over 10,000 years old.[2] The oldest fossils are from around 3.48 billion years old[3][4][5] to 4.1 billion years old.[6][7] The observation in the 19th century that certain fossils were associated with certain rock strata led to the recognition of a geological timescale and the relative ages of different fossils
[...More...]

"Fossil" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
[...More...]

"England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Master's Degree
A master's degree[fn 1] (from Latin
Latin
magister) is usually a second-cycle academic degree awarded by universities or colleges upon completion of a course of study demonstrating mastery or a high-order overview of a specific field of study or area of professional practice.[1] A master's degree normally requires previous study at the bachelor's level, either as a separate degree or as part of an integrated course
[...More...]

"Master's Degree" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Royal Society
The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
of London for Improving Natural Knowledge,[1] commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded in November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society".[1] It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world.[2] The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences
Academy of Sciences
and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement. The society is governed by its Council, which is chaired by the Society's President, according to a set of statutes and standing orders
[...More...]

"Royal Society" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Flora
Flora
Flora
is the plant life occurring in a particular region or time, generally the naturally occurring or indigenous—native plant life. The corresponding term for animal life is fauna. Flora, fauna and other forms of life such as fungi are collectively referred to as biota. Sometimes bacteria and fungi are also referred to as flora, as in the terms gut flora or skin flora.[1][2][3]Contents1 Etymology 2 Flora
Flora
classifications 3 Documentation of floras 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The word "flora" comes from the Latin
Latin
name of Flora, the goddess of plants, flowers, and fertility in Roman mythology.[4][citation needed] The distinction between vegetation (the general appearance of a community) and flora (the taxonomic composition of a community) was first made by Jules Thurmann
Jules Thurmann
(1849)
[...More...]

"Flora" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pleurisy
Pleurisy, also known as pleuritis, is inflammation of the membranes (pleurae) that surround the lungs and line the chest cavity.[1] This can result in a sharp chest pain with breathing.[1] Occasionally the pain may be a constant dull ache.[6] Other symptoms may include shortness of breath, cough, fever or weight loss, depending on the underlying cause.[6] The most common cause is a viral infection.[2] Other causes include pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, autoimmune disorders, lung cancer, following heart surgery, pancreatitis, chest trauma, and asbestosis.[2] Occasionally the cause remains unknown.[2] The underlying mechanism involves the rubbing together of the pleurae instead of smooth gliding.[1] Other conditions that can produce similar symptoms include pericarditis, heart attack, cholecystitis, and pneumothorax.[3] Diagnosis may include a chest X-ray, electrocardiogram (ECG), and blood tests.[3][7] Treatment depends on the underlying cause.[3] Paracetamol (acetaminophen) and ibuprof
[...More...]

"Pleurisy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tooth
A tooth (plural teeth) is a hard, calcified structure found in the jaws (or mouths) of many vertebrates and used to break down food. Some animals, particularly carnivores, also use teeth for hunting or for defensive purposes. The roots of teeth are covered by gums. Teeth are not made of bone, but rather of multiple tissues of varying density and hardness. The cellular tissues that ultimately become teeth originate from the embryonic germ layer, the ectoderm. The general structure of teeth is similar across the vertebrates, although there is considerable variation in their form and position. The teeth of mammals have deep roots, and this pattern is also found in some fish, and in crocodilians. In most teleost fish, however, the teeth are attached to the outer surface of the bone, while in lizards they are attached to the inner surface of the jaw by one side
[...More...]

"Tooth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mousehole
Mousehole
Mousehole
(/ˈmaʊzəl/; Cornish: Porthenys) is a village and fishing port in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom.[1] It is situated about 2.5 miles (4 km) south of Penzance
Penzance
on the shore of Mount's Bay.[2] The village is in the civil parish of Penzance. An islet called St Clement's Isle lies about 350 metres (380 yd) offshore from the harbour entrance. Mousehole
Mousehole
lies within the Cornwall
Cornwall
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Almost a third of Cornwall
Cornwall
has AONB designation, with the same status and protection as a National Park.Contents1 History1.1 20th century 1.2 Local government2 Notable residents 3 Literary associations 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Mousehole, along with Marazion, was until the 16th century one of the principal ports of Mount's Bay
[...More...]

"Mousehole" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

William Jones (philologist)
Sir William Jones FRS FRSE
FRSE
(28 September 1746 – 27 April 1794) was an Anglo-Welsh
Anglo-Welsh
philologist, a puisne judge on the Supreme Court of Judicature at Fort William in Bengal, and a scholar of ancient India, particularly known for his proposition of the existence of a relationship among European and Indian languages, which would later be known as Indo-European languages
[...More...]

"William Jones (philologist)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.