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Edna Ferber
Edna Ferber
Edna Ferber
(August 15, 1885[1] – April 16, 1968) was an American novelist, short story writer and playwright. Her novels included the Pulitzer Prize-winning So Big (1924), Show Boat
Show Boat
(1926; made into the celebrated 1927 musical), Cimarron (1929; made into the 1931 film which won the Academy Award for Best Picture), Giant (1952; made into the 1956 Hollywood movie) and Ice Palace (1958), filmed in 1960.Contents1 Life and career1.1 Early years 1.2 Career 1.3 Personal life2 Legacy2.1 Art, entertainment, and media 2.2 Structures3 Bibliography3.1 Novels 3.2 Plays 3.3 Screenplays 3.4 Essays and reporting 3.5 Musical adaptations4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Kalamazoo, Michigan
Kalamazoo /ˌkæləməˈzuː/ is a city in the southwest region of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Michigan. It is the county seat of Kalamazoo County. As of the 2010 census, Kalamazoo had a population of 74,262. Kalamazoo is the major city of the Kalamazoo-Portage Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of 335,340 as of 2015.[6] Kalamazoo is equidistant from the major American cities of Chicago
Chicago
and Detroit, each less than 150 miles away. One of Kalamazoo's most notable features is the Kalamazoo Mall, an outdoor pedestrian shopping mall
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Colleen Moore
Colleen Moore
Colleen Moore
(August 19, 1899 – January 25, 1988)[1] was an American film actress who began her career during the silent film era.[2] Moore became one of the most fashionable (and highly-paid) stars of the era and helped popularize the bobbed haircut. A huge star in her day, approximately half of Moore's films are now considered lost, including her first talking picture from 1929. What was perhaps her most celebrated film during her lifetime, Flaming Youth (1923), is now mostly lost as well, with only one reel surviving. Moore took a brief hiatus from acting between 1929 and 1933, just as sound was being added to motion pictures
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1920 Democratic National Convention
The 1920 Democratic National Convention
Democratic National Convention
was held at the Civic Auditorium in San Francisco, California
California
from June 28 to July 6, 1920. It resulted in the nomination of Governor James M. Cox
James M. Cox
of Ohio
Ohio
for President and Assistant Secretary of the Navy
Assistant Secretary of the Navy
Franklin D
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New York City, New York
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de
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Protagonist
A protagonist (from Ancient Greek πρωταγωνιστής (protagonistes), meaning 'player of the first part, (chief actor)' is the main character in any story, such as a literary work or drama.[1][2] The protagonist is at the center of the story, makes the key decisions, and experiences the consequences of those decisions. The protagonist affects the main characters' circumstances as well, as they are often the primary actor propelling the story forward. If a story contains a subplot, or is a narrative made up of several stories, then the character who is interpreted as the protagonist of each subplot or individual story.[3] The word protagonist is used notably in stories and forms of literature and culture that contain stories, which would include dramas, novels, operas and films
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Academy Awards
MoonlightBest Picture The Shape of WaterThe Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars,[1] are a set of 24 awards for artistic and technical merit in the American film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", which has become commonly known by its nickname "Oscar". The sculpture was created by George Stanley.[2] The awards, first presented in 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, are overseen by AMPAS.[3][4] The awards ceremony was first broadcast on radio in 1930 and televised for the first time in 1953. It is now seen live in more than 200 countries and can be streamed live online.[5] The Academy Awards ceremony is the oldest worldwide entertainment awards ceremony
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Musical Theatre
Musical theatre
Musical theatre
is a form of theatrical performance that combines songs, spoken dialogue, acting and dance. The story and emotional content of a musical – humor, pathos, love, anger – are communicated through the words, music, movement and technical aspects of the entertainment as an integrated whole. Although musical theatre overlaps with other theatrical forms like opera and dance, it may be distinguished by the equal importance given to the music as compared with the dialogue, movement and other elements. Since the early 20th century, musical theatre stage works have generally been called, simply, musicals. Although music has been a part of dramatic presentations since ancient times, modern Western musical theatre emerged during the 19th century, with many structural elements established by the works of Gilbert and Sullivan in Britain and those of Harrigan and Hart in America
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Oscar Hammerstein II
Oscar Greeley Clendenning Hammerstein II (/ˈhæmərstaɪn/; July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was an American librettist, theatrical producer, and (usually uncredited) theatre director of musicals for almost forty years. Hammerstein won eight Tony Awards and two Academy Awards for Best Original Song. Many of his songs are standard repertoire for vocalists and jazz musicians. He co-wrote 850 songs. Hammerstein was the lyricist and playwright in his partnerships; his collaborators wrote the music. Hammerstein collaborated with numerous composers, such as Jerome Kern, with whom he wrote Show Boat, Vincent Youmans, Rudolf Friml, Richard A. Whiting
Richard A

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Silent Film
A silent film is a film with no synchronized recorded sound (and in particular, no spoken dialogue). In silent films for entertainment, dialogue is conveyed by the use of muted gestures and mime in conjunction with title cards, written indications of the plot and key dialogue lines. The idea of combining motion pictures with recorded sound is nearly as old as film itself, but because of the technical challenges involved, the introduction of synchronized dialogue became practical only in the late 1920s in film with the perfection of the Audion amplifier tube
Audion amplifier tube
and the advent of the Vitaphone
Vitaphone
system
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Barbara Stanwyck
Barbara Stanwyck
Barbara Stanwyck
(born Ruby Catherine Stevens; July 16, 1907 – January 20, 1990) was an American actress, model and dancer. She was a film and television star, known during her 60-year career as a consummate and versatile professional with a strong, realistic screen presence, and a favorite of directors including Cecil B. DeMille, Fritz Lang, and Frank Capra. After a short but notable career as a stage actress in the late 1920s, she made 85 films in 38 years in Hollywood, before turning to television. Orphaned at the age of four and partially raised in foster homes, by 1944 Stanwyck had become the highest-paid woman in the United States. She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress
Academy Award for Best Actress
four times, for Stella Dallas (1937), Ball of Fire
Ball of Fire
(1941), Double Indemnity (1944) and Sorry, Wrong Number (1948)
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Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
The Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Journal Sentinel is a daily morning broadsheet printed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It is the primary newspaper in Milwaukee, the largest newspaper in Wisconsin
Wisconsin
and is distributed widely throughout the state
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George Brent
George Brent
George Brent
(born George Patrick Nolan, 15 March 1904 – 26 May 1979) was an Irish-born American stage, film, and television actor.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Filmography4.1 Feature films 4.2 Short subjects5 Radio appearances 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Brent was born in Ballinasloe, County Galway, in 1904[2] to John J. and Mary (née McGuinness) Nolan. His mother was a native of Clonfad, Moore, County Roscommon.[4] During the Irish War of Independence (1919–1922), Brent was involved in the Irish Republican Army.[5][6] He fled Ireland
Ireland
with a bounty set on his head by the British government, although he later claimed only to have been a courier for guerrilla leader and tactician Michael Collins
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Bette Davis
Ruth Elizabeth Davis (/ˈbɛti/; April 5, 1908 – October 6, 1989) was an American actress of film, television, and theater. Regarded as one of the greatest actresses in Hollywood history,[2] she was noted for her willingness to play unsympathetic, sardonic characters and was famous for her performances in a range of film genres, from contemporary crime melodramas to historical and period films, suspense horror and occasional comedies, although her greatest successes were her roles in romantic dramas.[3] After appearing in Broadway plays, Davis moved to Hollywood in 1930. However, her early films for Universal Studios
Universal Studios
(and as a loanout to other studios) were unsuccessful. She joined Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
in 1932 and established her career with several critically acclaimed performances. In 1937, she attempted to free herself from her contract
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Remake
A remake is a film or television series that is based on an earlier work and tells the same, or a very similar, story.[1] A reimagining, however, is a remake that is not directly identical to the original.Contents1 Film 2 Television 3 Video games 4 Reimagine or renovate 5 Re-version 6 See also 7 ReferencesFilm[edit] The term "remake" is generally used in reference to a movie which uses an earlier movie as the main source material, rather than in reference to a second, later movie based on the same source. For example, 2001's Ocean's Eleven
Ocean's Eleven
is a remake of Ocean's 11, while 1989's Batman is a re-interpretation of the comic book source material which also inspired 1966's Batman. In 1998, Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
produced an almost shot-for-shot remake of Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 film Psycho. With the exception of shot-for-shot remakes, most remakes make significant character, plot, genre and theme changes
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Alexander Woollcott
Alexander Humphreys Woollcott (January 19, 1887 – January 23, 1943) was an American critic and commentator for The New Yorker
The New Yorker
magazine and a member of the Algonquin Round Table. He was the inspiration for Sheridan Whiteside, the main character in the play The Man Who Came to Dinner
The Man Who Came to Dinner
(1939) by George S. Kaufman
George S. Kaufman
and Moss Hart,[1] and for the far less likable character Waldo Lydecker in the film Laura (1944)
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