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Edmunds–Tucker Act
Latter Day Saints portal  Bookv t eThe Edmunds–Tucker Act
Edmunds–Tucker Act
of 1887 was an Act of Congress
Act of Congress
that focused on restricting some practices of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). It was passed in response to the dispute between the United States Congress
United States Congress
and the LDS Church regarding polygamy. The act is found in US Code Title 48 & 1461, full text as 24 Stat. 635, with this annotation to be interpreted as Volume 24, page 635 of United States Statutes at Large. The act is named after its congressional sponsors, Senator George F. Edmunds
George F

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Act Of Congress
An Act of Congress
Congress
is a statute enacted by the United States Congress. It can either be a Public Law, relating to the general public, or a Private Law, relating to specific institutions or individuals. The term can be used in other countries with a legislature named "Congress", such as the Congress
Congress
of the Philippines.Contents1 Public law, private law, designation 2 Usage 3 Promulgation
Promulgation
(United States) 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPublic law, private law, designation[edit]Private Law 86-407Public Law 86-90 (STATUTE-073-1-2), Page 212In the United States, Acts of Congress
Congress
are designated as either public laws, relating to the general public, or private laws, relating to specific institutions or individuals
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United States House Committee On The Judiciary
The U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, also called the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. It is charged with overseeing the administration of justice within the federal courts, administrative agencies and Federal law enforcement entities. The Judiciary Committee is also the committee responsible for impeachments of federal officials. Because of the legal nature of its oversight, committee members usually have a legal background, but this is not required. In the 115th Congress, the chairman of the committee is Republican Bob Goodlatte of Virginia, and the ranking minority member was Democrat John Conyers
John Conyers
of Michigan. On November 26, 2017, Conyers stepped down from his position as ranking member, while he faces an ethics investigation.[1] On November 28, 2017, Jerrold Nadler
Jerrold Nadler
of New York was named as acting ranking member
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Celestial Marriage
Celestial marriage
Celestial marriage
(also called the New and Everlasting Covenant of Marriage, Eternal Marriage, Temple Marriage or The Principle) is a doctrine of Mormonism, particularly The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and branches of Mormon fundamentalism.Contents1 In the LDS Church 2 New Testament view 3 Sealing 4 Relationship to plural marriage 5 Swedenborg 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksIn the LDS Church[edit] Within the LDS Church, celestial marriage is an ordinance associated with a covenant that usually takes place inside temples by those authorized to hold the sealing power. The only people allowed to enter the temple, be married there, or attend these weddings are those who hold an official temple recommend. Obtaining a temple recommend requires one to abide by LDS Church doctrine and be interviewed and considered worthy by their bishop and stake president
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United States Statutes At Large
The United States Statutes at Large, commonly referred to as the Statutes at Large and abbreviated Stat., are an official record of Acts of Congress and concurrent resolutions passed by the United States Congress. Each act and resolution of Congress is originally published as a slip law, which is classified as either public law (abbreviated Pub.L.) or private law (Pvt.L.), and designated and numbered accordingly. At the end of a Congressional session, the statutes enacted during that session are compiled into bound books, known as "session law" publications. The session law publication for U.S. Federal statutes is called the United States Statutes at Large. In that publication, the public laws and private laws are numbered and organised in chronological order.[1] U.S
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Legal Status Of Polygamy
The legality of polygamy varies widely around the world. Polygamy
Polygamy
is legal in 58 out of nearly 200 sovereign states, the vast majority of them being Muslim-majority countries
Muslim-majority countries
situated in Africa and Asia. In most of these states, polygyny is allowed and legally sanctioned. Polyandry
Polyandry
is illegal in virtually every state in the world
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Joseph Smith
Joseph Smith
Joseph Smith
Jr. (December 23, 1805 – June 27, 1844) was an American religious leader and founder of Mormonism
Mormonism
and the Latter Day Saint movement. When he was twenty-four, Smith published the Book
Book
of Mormon. By the time of his death fourteen years later, he had attracted tens of thousands of followers and founded a religious culture that continues to the present. Smith was born in Sharon, Vermont. By 1817, he had moved with his family to what became known as the burned-over district of western New York, an area of intense religious revivalism during the Second Great Awakening. According to Smith, he experienced a series of visions, including one in which he saw "two personages" (presumably God the Father and Jesus Christ) and others in which an angel directed him to a buried book of golden plates inscribed with a Judeo-Christian history of an ancient American civilization
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Grover Cleveland
Stephen Grover Cleveland
Grover Cleveland
(March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was an American politician and lawyer who was the 22nd and 24th president of the United States, the only president in American history to serve two non-consecutive terms in office (1885–89 and 1893–97).[1] He won the popular vote for three presidential elections – in 1884, 1888, and 1892 – and was one of two Democrats (with Woodrow Wilson) to be elected president during the era of Republican political domination dating from 1861 to 1933. Cleveland was the leader of the pro-business Bourbon Democrats
Bourbon Democrats
who opposed high tariffs, Free Silver, inflation, imperialism, and subsidies to business, farmers, or veterans on libertarian philosophical grounds
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United States Senate Committee On The Judiciary
The United States Senate
United States Senate
Committee on the Judiciary, informally the Senate Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of 21 U.S. Senators whose role is to oversee of the Department of Justice (DOJ), consider executive nominations, and review pending legislation.[1][2] The Judiciary Committee's oversight of the DOJ includes all of the agencies under the DOJ's jurisdiction, such as the FBI
FBI
and the Department of Homeland Security
Department of Homeland Security
(DHS). The Committee considers presidential nominations for positions in the DOJ, the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the State Justice Institute, and certain positions in the Department of Commerce
Department of Commerce
and DHS. It is also in charge of holding hearings and investigating judicial nominations to the Supreme Court, the U.S. court of appeals, the U.S
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Vermont
Vermont
Vermont
(/vərˈmɒnt, vɜːr-/ ( listen))[8][a] is a state in the New England
New England
region of the Northeastern United States. It borders the U.S. states of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
to the south, New Hampshire to the east and New York to the west, and the Canadian province of Quebec
Quebec
to the north. Lake Champlain
Lake Champlain
forms half of Vermont's western border with New York. The Green Mountains
Green Mountains
run north-south for the length of the state. Vermont
Vermont
is the second smallest by population and the sixth smallest by area of the 50 U.S. states. The state capital is Montpelier, the least populous state capital in the United States. The most populous city, Burlington, is the least populous city to be the most populous city in a state
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Republican Party (United States)
The Republican Party, commonly referred to as the GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being its historic rival, the Democratic Party. The party is named after republicanism, the dominant value during the American Revolution. Founded by anti-slavery activists, economic modernizers, ex Whigs and ex Free Soilers in 1854, the Republicans dominated politics nationally and in the majority of northern states for most of the period between 1860 and 1932.[16] The Republican Party originally championed classical liberal ideas, including anti-slavery and economic reforms.[17][18] The party was usually dominant over the Democrats during the Third Party System
Third Party System
and Fourth Party System. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
formed the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party after being rejected by the GOP and ran as a candidate
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Book
A book is a series of pages assembled for easy portability and reading, as well as the composition contained in it. The book's most common modern form is that of a codex volume consisting of rectangular paper pages bound on one side, with a heavier cover and spine, so that it can fan open for reading. Books have taken other forms, such as scrolls, leaves on a string, or strips tied together; and the pages have been of parchment, vellum, papyrus, bamboo slips, palm leaves, silk, wood, and other materials.[1] The contents of books are also called books, as are other compositions of that length. For instance, Aristotle's Physics, the constituent sections of the Bible, and even the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Book of the Dead
are called books independently of their physical form. Conversely, some long literary compositions are divided into books of varying sizes, which typically do not correspond to physically bound units
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United States Code
The Code of Laws of the United States
United States
of America[1] (variously abbreviated to Code of Laws of the United States, United States
United States
Code, U.S. Code, U.S.C., or USC) is the official compilation and codification of the general and permanent federal statutes of the United States
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Title 48 Of The United States Code
Title 48 of the United States Code outlines the role of United States territories and insular areas in the United States Code.Chapter 1: Bureau of Insular Affairs Chapter 2: Alaska Chapter 3: Hawaii Chapter 4: Puerto Rico Chapter 5: Philippine Islands Chapter 6: Panama Canal Zone Chapter 7: Virgin Islands Chapter 8: Guano Islands Chapter 8a: Guam Chapter 9: Samoa, Tutuila, Manua, Swains Island, and Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands Chapter 10: Territorial Provisions of a General Nature Chapter 11: Alien Owners of Land Chapter 12: Virgin Islands Chapter 13: Eastern Samoa Chapter 14: Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands Chapter 15: Conveyance of Submerged Lands to Territories Chapter 16: Delegates to Congress Chapter 17: Northern Mariana Islands Chapter 18: Micronesia, Marshall Islands, and Palau Chapter 19: Pacific Policy ReportsExternal links[edit]Wikisource has original text related to this article: United States Code/Title 48U.S
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Timeline Of Civil Marriage In The United States
Many laws in the history of the United States
United States
have addressed marriage and the rights of married people. Common themes addressed by these laws include polygamy, interracial marriage, divorce, and same-sex marriage.Contents1 1800–1899 2 1900–1999 3 2000–present 4 See also 5 References1800–1899[edit]1830 – Married women are granted the right to own property in their own name, instead of being owned exclusively by the husband, in Mississippi. 1848 – Married women are granted the right to own property in their own name in New York. 1856 – The platform of the Republican Party refers to polygamy as one of the "twin relics of barbarism" (alongside slavery).[1] At the time, polygamy was a practice of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church)
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