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Edisto Island, South Carolina
Edisto Island is one of South Carolina's Sea Islands, the larger part of which lies in Charleston County, with its southern tip in Colleton County. The town of Edisto Beach
Edisto Beach
is in Colleton County, while the Charleston County part of the island is unincorporated. The island, town, and Edisto River
Edisto River
are named after the historic Edistow people, a Native American sub-tribe of the Cusabo Indians, who inhabited the island as well as nearby mainland areas.Contents1 History1.1 Civil war 1.2 Historic preservation2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Notable people 5 See also 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksHistory[edit] Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples
often had fishing camps on the islands, using them seasonally
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Edisto, Orangeburg County, South Carolina
Edisto is an unincorporated community and census-designated place in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, United States. Its population was 2,559 as of the 2010 census.[1] U.S. Route 601 passes through the community. Geography[edit] According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the community has an area of 5.458 square miles (14.14 km2); 5.418 square miles (14.03 km2) of its area is land, and 0.040 square miles (0.10 km2) is water.[1] References[edit]^ a b c d "2010 Census Gazetteer Files - Places: South Carolina". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved October 22, 2017.  ^ "Edisto". Geographic Names Information System
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Edisto River
The Edisto River
Edisto River
is one of the longest free-flowing blackwater rivers in North America,[1] flowing over 250[1] meandering miles from its sources in Saluda and Edgefield counties, to its Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
mouth at Edisto Beach, South Carolina. It rises in two main tributaries (North Fork & South Fork) from springs under the Sandhills region of West Central South Carolina, just to the south of the Piedmont Fall Line. It is the longest and largest river system completely contained by the borders of South Carolina. Its name comes from the Edisto subtribe of the Cusabo Indians. Near the coast, part of the river was once known as the Ponpon River. The Dawhoo River (sometimes Dawho, or Dawhoe) connects the Edisto to the North Edisto River, also the confluence of the Wadmalaw and the Toogoodoo rivers, where they meet the Atlantic Ocean
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Old House Plantation
Old House Plantation, also known as Daniel Heyward Plantation, is a historic plantation site and grave located near Ridgeland, Jasper County, South Carolina. The plantation was first settled in 1743 and was likely active through the first quarter of the 19th century. It was the birthplace and burial site of Thomas Heyward, Jr., one of South Carolina’s four signers of the Declaration of Independence. The plantation site includes a variety of plantation structures including the main house, two probable flanking outbuildings (one of which is likely a kitchen), a tidal mill, stable and likely slave quarters. Associated with the plantation is the Heyward family cemetery and surrounding brick wall.[2] It was added to the National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
in 1997.[1] References[edit]^ a b National Park Service
National Park Service
(2010-07-09). "National Register Information System"
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Brick House Ruins
The Paul Hamilton House, commonly referred to as the Brick House Ruins, is the ruin of a 1725 plantation house on Edisto Island, South Carolina, that burned in 1929. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1970 for the unusual architecture of the surviving walls, which is based on part on French Huguenot architecture of the period.[3]Contents1 Construction1.1 Materials2 Architecture 3 History 4 Currently 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksConstruction[edit] The house was constructed about 1725 for Paul Hamilton, a wealthy South Carolina planter, on Edisto Island, one of the Sea Islands in what was then the Province of South Carolina.[2] Materials[edit] The two-story house was constructed with exterior walls of brick imported from Boston, such brick being harder and denser than the local kind. The interior of the home was primarily constructed of locally produced lumber which had been aged seven years
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Battle Of Secessionville
The Battle of Secessionville (or the First Battle of James Island) was fought on June 16, 1862, during the American Civil War. Confederate forces defeated the Union's only attempt to capture Charleston, South Carolina, by land.Contents1 Prelude 2 Battle 3 Aftermath 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPrelude[edit] The importance of Charleston to the Confederate cause, after the Union implemented their Anaconda Plan, can be summarized in the words of Gen. Robert E
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Edisto Island During The Civil War
An island or isle is any piece of sub-continental land that is surrounded by water.[2] Very small islands such as emergent land features on atolls can be called islets, skerries, cays or keys. An island in a river or a lake island may be called an eyot or ait, and a small island off the coast may be called a holm. A grouping of geographically or geologically related islands is called an archipelago, such as the Philippines, for example. An island may be described as such, despite the presence of an artificial land bridge; examples are Singapore
Singapore
and its causeway, and the various Dutch delta islands, such as IJsselmonde. Some places may even retain "island" in their names for historical reasons after being connected to a larger landmass by a land bridge or landfill, such as Coney Island
Coney Island
and Coronado Island, though these are, strictly speaking, tied islands
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Gullah Language
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era
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Africans
The population of Africa
Africa
has grown rapidly over the past century,[2] and consequently shows a large youth bulge, further reinforced by a low life expectancy of below 50 years in some African countries.[3] Total population as of 2017 is estimated at more than 1.25 billion, with a growth rate of more than 2.5% p.a.Contents1 Population growth 2 Health 3 Ethnicity 4 Major languages4.1 Central Africa 4.2 Horn of Africa 4.3 North Africa 4.4 Southeast Africa 4.5 Southern Africa 4.6 West Africa 4.7 Immigrants5 List of African countries by population 6 See also
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Unincorporated Area
In law, an unincorporated area is a region of land that is not governed by a local municipal corporation; similarly an unincorporated community is a region of land that is not governed by its own local municipal corporation, but rather is administered as part of larger administrative divisions, such as a township, parish, borough, county, city, canton, state, province or country. Occasionally, municipalities dissolve or disincorporate, which may happen if they become fiscally insolvent, and services become the responsibility of a higher administration. In some countries, such as in Brazil, Japan, France or the United Kingdom, all areas of the country are incorporated
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Wassamassaw
The Wassamassaw Tribe of Varnertown Indians, is a small state recognized tribe of Native Americans descended from historic tribes of the Colonial Era. Located in Berkeley County in the Low Country, in 2005 the people were granted recognition as an Indian group by the State of South Carolina, the first stage in recognition as a tribe. The tribe is headquartered in Berkeley County, South Carolina. The tribe is one of six that were recognized in the early 21st century by South Carolina, including the Waccamaw- Siouan
Siouan
Tribe, the Chaloklowa Chickasaw, some Pee Dee bands, and a composite group known as "The Eastern Cherokee, Southern Iroquois, and United Tribes." The Catawba Indian Nation is the only one in South Carolina
South Carolina
that is federally recognized by the U.S
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Catawba People
The Catawba, also known as Issa or Essa or Iswä but most commonly Iswa (Catawba: iswa - "people of the river"), are a federally recognized tribe of Native Americans, known as the Catawba Indian Nation. They live in the Southeast United States, along the border of North Carolina
North Carolina
near the city of Rock Hill, South Carolina. The Catawba were once considered one of the most powerful Southeastern Siouan-speaking tribes in the Carolina Piedmont. The Catawba and other Siouan
Siouan
peoples are believed to have coalesced as individual tribes in the Southeast. Living along the Catawba River
Catawba River
they were named one of the most powerful tribes in the south. Primarily involved in agriculture, the Catawba were friendly toward early European colonists
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Indigenous Peoples
Indigenous peoples, also known as first peoples, aboriginal peoples or native peoples, are ethnic groups who are the original inhabitants of a given region, in contrast to groups that have settled, occupied or colonized the area more recently. Groups are usually described as indigenous when they maintain traditions or other aspects of an early culture that is associated with a given region. Not all indigenous peoples share this characteristic, usually having adopted substantial elements of a colonising culture, such as dress, religion or language. Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples
may be settled in a given region (sedentary) or exhibit a nomadic lifestyle across a large territory, but they are generally historically associated with a specific territory on which they depend
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Cusabo
The Cusabo or Corsaboy were a group of historic Native American tribes who lived along the coast of the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
in what is now South Carolina, approximately between present-day Charleston and south to the Savannah River, at the time of European encounter. English colonists often referred to them as one of the Settlement Indians of South Carolina, tribes who settled among the colonists. Five of the groups were recorded by the settlers as having spoken a common language, although one distinctly different from the major language families known nearby, such as Algonquian, Iroquoian, Muskogean, and Siouan. With the English settling on their land at Charleston beginning in the 17th century, the Cusabo developed a relationship of accommodation with the colony that persisted through the early 18th century
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Native Americans In The United States
American Indian and Alaska
Alaska
Native (2010 Census Bureau)[1] One race: 2,932,248 are registered In combination with one or more of the other races listed: 2,288,331 Total: 5,220,579 ~ 1.6% of the total U.S
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Berkeley County, South Carolina
Berkeley County is a county in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of South Carolina. As of the 2010 census, its population was 177,843.[1] Its county seat is Moncks Corner.[2] After two previous incarnations of Berkeley County, the current county was created in 1882.[3] Berkeley County is included in the Charleston-North Charleston, SC Metropolitan Statistical Area.Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Adjacent counties 2.2 National protected areas3 Demographics3.1 2000 census 3.2 2010 census4 Public safety4.1 Law enforcement 4.2 Emergency medical services 4.3 Fire protection5 Politics 6 Attractions 7 Communities7.1 Cities 7.2 Towns 7.3 Census-designated places 7.4 Other unincorporated communities8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] Berkeley County was established in 1682. It was named after John and William Berkeley, co-owners of the Province of Carolina. It became part of the Charleston District in 1769
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