HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Earth’s Atmosphere
The atmosphere of Earth
Earth
is the layer of gases, commonly known as air, that surrounds the planet Earth
Earth
and is retained by Earth's gravity. The atmosphere of Earth
Earth
protects life on Earth
Earth
by creating pressure allowing for liquid water to exist on the Earth's surface, absorbing ultraviolet solar radiation, warming the surface through heat retention (greenhouse effect), and reducing temperature extremes between day and night (the diurnal temperature variation). By volume, dry air contains 78.09% nitrogen, 20.95% oxygen,[2] 0.93% argon, 0.04% carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases. Air also contains a variable amount of water vapor, on average around 1% at sea level, and 0.4% over the entire atmosphere
[...More...]

"Earth’s Atmosphere" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Air (other)
Air
Air
is the name given to the Earth's atmosphere. Air
Air
may also refer to:Contents1 Places 2 People 3 Arts, entertainment, and media3.1 Art 3.2 Films 3.3 Musi
[...More...]

"Air (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aerosol
An aerosol is a suspension of fine solid particles or liquid droplets, in air or another gas.[1] Aerosols can be natural or anthropogenic. Examples of natural aerosols are fog, dust, forest exudates and geyser steam. Examples of anthropogenic aerosols are haze, particulate air pollutants and smoke.[1] The liquid or solid particles have diameter mostly smaller than 1 μm or so; larger particles with a significant settling speed make the mixture a suspension, but the distinction is not clear-cut. In general conversation, aerosol usually refers to an aerosol spray that delivers a consumer product from a can or similar container
[...More...]

"Aerosol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Outer Space
Outer space, or just space, is the expanse that exists beyond the Earth
Earth
and between celestial bodies. Outer space
Outer space
is not completely empty—it is a hard vacuum containing a low density of particles, predominantly a plasma of hydrogen and helium as well as electromagnetic radiation, magnetic fields, neutrinos, dust, and cosmic rays
[...More...]

"Outer Space" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kármán Line
The Kármán line, or Karman line, lies at an altitude of 100 km (62 mi; 330,000 ft) above Earth's sea level and commonly represents the boundary between Earth's atmosphere
Earth's atmosphere
and outer space.[2] This definition is accepted by the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI), which is an international standard-setting and record-keeping body for aeronautics and astronautics. The line is named after Theodore von Kármán
Theodore von Kármán
(1881–1963), a Hungarian American
Hungarian American
engineer and physicist, who was active primarily in aeronautics and astronautics
[...More...]

"Kármán Line" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Atmospheric Reentry
Atmospheric entry
Atmospheric entry
is the movement of an object from outer space into and through the gases of an atmosphere of a planet, dwarf planet or natural satellite. There are two main types of atmospheric entry: uncontrolled entry, such as the entry of astronomical objects, space debris or bolides; and controlled entry (or reentry) of a spacecraft capable of being navigated or following a predetermined course. Technologies and procedures allowing the controlled atmospheric entry, descent and landing of spacecraft are collectively abbreviated as EDL.Animated illustration of different phases as a meteoroid enters the Earth's atmosphere to become visible as a meteor and land as a meteoriteAtmospheric drag and aerodynamic heating can cause atmospheric breakup capable of completely disintegrating smaller objects
[...More...]

"Atmospheric Reentry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Atmospheric Stratification
The atmosphere of Earth
Earth
is the layer of gases, commonly known as air, that surrounds the planet Earth
Earth
and is retained by Earth's gravity. The atmosphere of Earth
Earth
protects life on Earth
Earth
by creating pressure allowing for liquid water to exist on the Earth's surface, absorbing ultraviolet solar radiation, warming the surface through heat retention (greenhouse effect), and reducing temperature extremes between day and night (the diurnal temperature variation). By volume, dry air contains 78.09% nitrogen, 20.95% oxygen,[2] 0.93% argon, 0.04% carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases. Air also contains a variable amount of water vapor, on average around 1% at sea level, and 0.4% over the entire atmosphere
[...More...]

"Atmospheric Stratification" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Atmospheric Sciences
Atmospheric physics Atmospheric dynamics (category) Atmospheric chemistry
Atmospheric chemistry
(category)Meteorology Weather
Wea

[...More...]

"Atmospheric Sciences" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Léon Teisserenc De Bort
Léon Philippe Teisserenc de Bort (5 November 1855 in Paris, France – 2 January 1913 in Cannes, France) was a French meteorologist and a pioneer in the field of aerology. Together with Richard Assmann (1845-1918), he is credited as co-discoverer of the stratosphere, as both men announced their discovery during the same time period in 1902.[1] Teisserenc de Bort pioneered the use of unmanned instrumented balloons and was the first to identify the region in the atmosphere around 8-17 kilometers of height where the lapse rate reaches zero, known today as the tropopause.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Instrumented balloons pioneer 3 Troposphere
Troposphere
and stratosphere 4 Additional investigations 5 Named after him 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEarly life and career[edit] He was the son of an engineer
[...More...]

"Léon Teisserenc De Bort" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Richard Assmann
Richard Assmann
Richard Assmann
(Anglicized spelling of the German name Richard Aßmann); (13 April 1845 – 28 May 1918) was a German meteorologist and physician who was a native of Magdeburg. He made numerous contributions in high altitude research of the Earth's atmosphere. He was a pioneer of scientific aeronautics and considered a co-founder of aerology.[1] In 1868 he received his medical doctorate in Berlin, and from 1870 to 1879 was a general practitioner in Bad Freienwalde. In 1879 he returned to Magdeburg
Magdeburg
to practice medicine. In 1885 he earned a doctorate in secondary studies at the Faculty of Philosophy at the University of Halle, and subsequently became a scientific officer at the Royal Meteorological Institute at Berlin-Grünau
[...More...]

"Richard Assmann" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Atmospheric Chemistry
Atmospheric physics Atmospheric dynamics (category) Atmospheric chemistry
Atmospheric chemistry
(category)Meteorology Weather
Weather
(category) · (portal) Tropical cyclone
Tropical cyclone
(category)Climatology Climate
Climate
(category) Climate
Climate
change (category) Global warming
Global warming
(category) · (portal)v t e Atmospheric chemistry
Atmospheric chemistry
is a branch of atmospheric science in which the chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere
Earth's atmosphere
and that of other planets is studied. It is a multidisciplinary approach of research and draws on environmental chemistry, physics, meteorology, computer modeling, oceanography, geology and volcanology and other disciplines
[...More...]

"Atmospheric Chemistry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Greenhouse Gas
A greenhouse gas is a gas in an atmosphere that absorbs and emits radiant energy within the thermal infrared range. This process is the fundamental cause of the greenhouse effect.[1] The primary greenhouse gases in Earth's atmosphere are water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and ozone
[...More...]

"Greenhouse Gas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chemical Compound
A chemical compound is a chemical substance composed of many identical molecules (or molecular entities) composed of atoms from more than one element held together by chemical bonds. There are four types of compounds, depending on how the constituent atoms are held together:molecules held together by covalent bonds ionic compounds held together by ionic bonds intermetallic compounds held together by metallic bonds certain complexes held together by coordinate covalent bonds.Many chemical compounds have a unique numerical identifier assigned by the Chemical Abstracts Service
Chemical Abstracts Service
(CAS): its CAS number. A chemical formula is a way of expressing information about the proportions of atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound, using the standard abbreviations for the chemical elements, and subscripts to indicate the number of atoms involved
[...More...]

"Chemical Compound" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dust
Dust
Dust
are fine particles of matter.[1] It generally consists of particles in the atmosphere that come from various sources such as soil, dust lifted by weather (an aeolian process), volcanic eruptions, and pollution
[...More...]

"Dust" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Troposphere
The troposphere is the lowest layer of Earth's atmosphere, and is also where nearly all weather conditions take place. It contains approximately 75% of the atmosphere's mass and 99% of the total mass of water vapor and aerosols.[2] The average depths of the troposphere are 20 km (12 mi) in the tropics, 17 km (11 mi) in the mid latitudes, and 7 km (4.3 mi) in the polar regions in winter. The lowest part of the troposphere, where friction with the Earth's surface influences air flow, is the planetary boundary layer. This layer is typically a few hundred meters to 2 km (1.2 mi) deep depending on the landform and time of day. Atop the troposphere is the tropopause, which is the border between the troposphere and stratosphere
[...More...]

"Troposphere" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pollen
Pollen
Pollen
is a fine to coarse powdery substance comprising pollen grains which are male microgametophytes of seed plants, which produce male gametes (sperm cells). Pollen
Pollen
grains have a hard coat made of sporopollenin that protects the gametophytes during the process of their movement from the stamens to the pistil of flowering plants, or from the male cone to the female cone of coniferous plants. If pollen lands on a compatible pistil or female cone, it germinates, producing a pollen tube that transfers the sperm to the ovule containing the female gametophyte. Individual pollen grains are small enough to require magnification to see detail
[...More...]

"Pollen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.