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Early Music Revival
The general discussion of how to perform music from ancient or earlier times did not become an important subject of interest until the 19th century, when Europeans began looking to ancient culture generally, and musicians began to discover the musical riches from earlier centuries. The idea of performing early music more "authentically", with a sense of incorporating performance practice, was more completely established in the 20th century, creating a modern early music revival that continues today.Contents1 Study and performance of ancient music before the 19th century 2 19th century 3 Early 20th century 4 Footnotes 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksStudy and performance of ancient music before the 19th century[edit] Musicians working before 1800 were already beginning to study ancient music
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Das Alte Werk
The Teldec
Teldec
(Telefunken-Decca Schallplatten GmbH) is a German record label in Hamburg, Germany. Today the label is a property of Warner Music Group.Contents1 History1.1 TeD video disc 1.2 Direct Metal Mastering2 Record label2.1 Das Alte Werk3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Teldec
Teldec
was a producer of (first) shellac and (later) vinyl records. The Teldec
Teldec
manufacturing facility was located in Nortorf
Nortorf
near Kiel
Kiel
in Germany. The company was founded in 1950 as a co-operation between Telefunken
Telefunken
and Decca Records. The name Teldec
Teldec
is the result of taking the first three letters of both labels: Telefunken
Telefunken
and Decca
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Lute Songs
The lute song was a generic form of music in the late Renaissance and very early Baroque eras, generally consisting of a singer accompanying himself on a lute, though lute songs may often have been performed by a singer and a separate lutenist. A bass viol was very often used to support the bass line in performance. Many of the composers of lute songs were themselves lutenists, and performed the songs themselves; many were also madrigalists or composers of chansons. In general, lute songs were written from about 1550 to around 1650, though there is evidence that some music was performed this way much earlier (for instance, Baldassare Castiglione mentions that frottola were sometimes performed by solo voice and lute, presumably in the first decade or so of the 16th century.) The lute song flourished in England, France
France
and Italy; it had different styles and names in each location. In England, it was called the ayre (or air)
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Recorder (musical Instrument)
The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument in the group known as internal duct flutes—flutes with a whistle mouthpiece. A recorder can be distinguished from other duct flutes by the presence of thumb-hole for the upper hand and seven finger-holes: three for the upper hand and four for the lower. It is the most prominent duct flute in the western classical tradition.[1] Recorders are made in different sizes with names and compasses roughly corresponding to different vocal ranges. The sizes most commonly in use today are the soprano (aka "descant", lowest note C5), alto (aka "treble", lowest note F4), tenor (lowest note C4) and bass (lowest note F3). Recorders are traditionally constructed from wood and ivory, while most recorders made in recent years are constructed from molded plastic. The recorders' internal and external proportions vary, but the bore is generally reverse conical (i.e
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Harpsichord
A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard, a row of levers which the player presses. When the player presses one or more keys, a mechanism that plucks one or more strings with a small quill is triggered. "Harpsichord" designates the whole family of similar plucked-keyboard instruments, including the smaller virginals, muselar, and spinet. The harpsichord was widely used in Renaissance and Baroque music. During the late 18th century, it gradually disappeared from the musical scene, with the rise of the piano
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Smithsonian Institution
The Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Institution
(/smɪθˈsoʊniən/ smith-SOH-nee-ən), established on August 10, 1846 "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge," is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the United States.[1] The institution is named after its founding donor, British scientist James Smithson.[2] Originally organized as the "United States National Museum," that name ceased to exist as an administrative entity in 1967.[3] Termed "the nation's attic"[4] for its eclectic holdings of 154 million items,[2] the Institution's nineteen museums, nine research centers, and zoo include historical and architectural landmarks, mostly located in the District of Columbia.[5] Additional facilities are located in Arizona, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York City, Pittsburgh, Texas, Virginia, and Panama
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Kunsthistorisches Museum
The Kunsthistorisches Museum
Kunsthistorisches Museum
(lit. "Museum of Art History", also often referred to as the "Museum of Fine Arts") is an art museum in Vienna, Austria. Housed in its festive palatial building on Ringstraße, it is crowned with an octagonal dome. The term Kunsthistorisches Museum applies to both the institution and the main building. It is the largest art museum in the country. It was opened around 1891 at the same time as the Natural History Museum, Vienna, by Emperor Franz Joseph I
Franz Joseph I
of Austria-Hungary. The two museums have similar exteriors and face each other across Maria-Theresien-Platz
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Museum Of Fine Arts, Boston
The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts, is the fifth largest museum in the United States. It contains more than 450,000 works of art, making it one of the most comprehensive collections in the Americas. With more than one million visitors a year,[2] it is the 43rd most-visited art museum in the world as of 2016[update]. Founded in 1870, the museum moved to its current location in 1909
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Metropolitan Museum Of Art
www.metmuseum.orgThe Metropolitan Museum of ArtU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesU.S. National Historic LandmarkElevation by Simon FieldhouseBuilt 1874; 144 years ago (1874)Architect Richard Morris Hunt; also Calvert Vaux; Jacob Wrey MouldArchitectural style Beaux-ArtsNRHP reference # 86003556Significant datesAdded to NRHP January 29, 1972[5]Designated NHLJune 24, 1986[6] [7]The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Metropolitan Museum of Art
of New York, colloquially "the Met",[a] is the largest art museum in the United States. With 7.06 million visitors in 2016, it was the second most visited art museum in the world, and the fifth most visited museum of any kind. [8] Its permanent collection contains over two million works,[9] divided among seventeen curatorial departments
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Martin Skowroneck
(Franz Hermann) Martin Skowroneck
Martin Skowroneck
(21 December 1926, in Berlin – 14 May 2014, in Bremen)[1] was a German harpsichord builder, one of the pioneers of the modern movement of harpsichord construction on historical principles.Contents1 Life and career 2 Instruments 3 Writings 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesLife and career[edit] He completed his secondary education in 1947,[2] then embarked on musical training at the Musikschule in Bremen, from which he received his diploma in 1950 as a teacher of flute and recorder
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Festival Of Flanders
Festival of Flanders
Flanders
(Dutch: Festival van Vlaanderen) is an annual music event at different locations in Flanders. It started initially as a "Summer Festival", but now its activities are spread from January to May, with a peak in late summer and early autumn.[1] History [2][edit] The Festival of Flanders
Flanders
has its roots in Tongeren, Limburg, where Jan Briers organized the Basilica-concerts from 1958 in the basilica of Tongeren. At first there was played religiously inspired choral music, but soon it was extended to other classical music, instrumental music; and other locations
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Johann Pepusch
Johann Christoph Pepusch
Johann Christoph Pepusch
(1667 – 20 July 1752), also known as John Christopher Pepusch and Dr Pepusch, was a German-born composer who spent most of his working life in England. Pepusch was born in Berlin. At the age of 14, he was appointed to the Prussian court. About 1700, he settled in England
England
where he was one of the founders, in 1726, of The Academy of Vocal Music, which around 1730/1 was renamed The Academy of Ancient Music
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The New Grove Dictionary Of Music And Musicians
The New Grove Dictionary of Music
Music
and Musicians is an encyclopedic dictionary of music and musicians. Along with the German-language Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart, it is one of the largest reference works on western music. Originally published under the title A Dictionary of Music
Music
and Musicians, and later as Grove's Dictionary of Music
Music
and Musicians, it has gone through several editions since the 19th century and is widely used
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Nadia Boulanger
Juliette Nadia Boulanger
Nadia Boulanger
(French: [ʒy.ljɛt na.dja bu.lɑ̃.ʒe]; 16 September 1887 – 22 October 1979) was a French composer, conductor, and teacher. She is notable for having taught many of the leading composers and musicians of the 20th century. She also performed occasionally as a pianist and organist.[1] From a musical family, she achieved early honours as a student at the Paris Conservatoire
Paris Conservatoire
but, believing that she had no particular talent as a composer, she gave up writing music and became a teacher
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Claudio Monteverdi
Claudio Giovanni Antonio Monteverdi (Italian: [ˈklaudjo monteˈverdi] ( listen); 15 May 1567 (baptized) – 29 November 1643) was an Italian composer, string player and choirmaster. A composer of both secular and sacred music, and a pioneer in the development of opera, he is considered a crucial transitional figure between the Renaissance and the Baroque
Baroque
periods of music history. Born in Cremona, where he undertook his first musical studies and compositions, Monteverdi developed his career first at the court of Mantua
Mantua
(c. 1590–1613) and then until his death in the Republic of Venice where he was maestro di capella at the basilica of San Marco. His surviving letters give insight into the life of a professional musician in Italy of the period, including problems of income, patronage and politics. Much of Monteverdi's output, including many stage works, has been lost
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