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Earl Of Devon
The title of Earl of Devon
Devon
was created several times in the English peerage, and was possessed first (after the Norman Conquest
Norman Conquest
of 1066) by the de Redvers (alias de Reviers, Revieres, etc.) family, and later by the Courtenays
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Roundel
A roundel is a circular disc used as a symbol. The term is used in heraldry, but also commonly used to refer to a type of national insignia used on military aircraft, generally circular in shape and usually comprising concentric rings of different colours. Other symbols also often use round shapes.Contents1 Heraldry 2 Military aircraft 3 Flags 4 In popular culture 5 Examples5.1 Military aircraft
Military aircraft
roundels 5.2 Other roundels6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesHeraldry[edit] Main article: Roundel
Roundel
(heraldry) In heraldry, a roundel is a circular charge. Roundels are among the oldest charges used in coats of arms, dating from at least the twelfth century
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Alfred The Great
Alfred the Great
Alfred the Great
(Old English: Ælfrēd,[a] Ælfrǣd[b], "elf counsel" or "wise elf"; 849 – 26 October 899) was King of Wessex
King of Wessex
from 871 to 899. Alfred was the youngest son of King Æthelwulf
Æthelwulf
of Wessex. Taking the throne after the death of his brother Æthelred, Alfred spent several years dealing with Viking
Viking
invasions. After a decisive victory in the Battle of Edington
Battle of Edington
in 878 Alfred made an agreement with the Vikings, creating what was known as Danelaw
Danelaw
in the North of England
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Devon
Devon
Devon
(/ˈdɛvən/), also known as Devonshire, which was formerly its common and official name, is a county of England, reaching from the Bristol Channel
Bristol Channel
in the north to the English Channel
English Channel
in the south. It is part of South West England, bounded by Cornwall
Cornwall
to the west, Somerset
Somerset
to the northeast, and Dorset
Dorset
to the east
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Starcross
Starcross
Starcross
/stɑːrˈkrɒs/ is a village with a population of 1,780[1] situated on the west shore of the Exe Estuary
Exe Estuary
in Teignbridge
Teignbridge
in the English county of Devon. The village is popular in summer with leisure craft, and is home to one of the United Kingdom's oldest sailing clubs. The A379 road
A379 road
and the London to Penzance railway line both run through the village along the banks of the estuary. Starcross
Starcross
railway station is situated on the railway, and the Starcross
Starcross
to Exmouth
Exmouth
Ferry, a small passenger ferry, operates across the estuary to Exmouth. A notable feature of Starcross
Starcross
is the Italianate
Italianate
pumping engine house, the best surviving building from Brunel's unsuccessful Atmospheric Railway
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River Exe
The River Exe
River Exe
(/ˈɛks/ EKS) in England
England
rises at Exe Head, near the village of Simonsbath, on Exmoor
Exmoor
in Somerset, 8.4 kilometres (5 mi) from the Bristol Channel
Bristol Channel
coast, but flows more or less directly due south, so that most of its length lies in Devon
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Courtesy Title
A courtesy title is a title that does not have legal significance but rather is used through custom or courtesy, particularly, in the context of nobility, the titles used by children of members of the nobility (c.f. substantive title).[1][2] In some contexts, courtesy title is used to mean the more general concept of a title or honorific such as Mr., Mrs., Ms., Dr., Miss, Sir, and Madam.[3]Contents1 Africa 2 France2.1 Ancien Régime2.1.1 Courtesy title as principal title 2.1.2 Courtesy title used by sons and daughters3 United Kingdom 4 See also 5 ReferencesAfrica[edit] In much of Africa, many of the surviving noble titles are social courtesies that are recognized by customary law and little else
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Ealdorman
An ealdorman (from Old English ealdorman, lit. "elder man"; plural: "ealdormen") was a high-ranking royal official and prior magistrate of an Anglo-Saxon shire or group of shires from about the ninth century to the time of King Cnut. The term "ealdorman" was rendered in Latin as dux in early West Saxon charters, and as præfectus (which is also the equivalent of gerefa, modern reeve, from which sheriff or shire reeve is derived)
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Odda, Ealdorman Of Devon
Odda, also known as Oddune,[1] was a ninth-century ealdorman of Devon. He is known for his victory at the Battle of Cynwit
Battle of Cynwit
in 878, where his West Saxon forces defeated a Viking army led by Ubba, brother of the Viking chiefs Ivar the Boneless
Ivar the Boneless
and Halfdan Ragnarsson. Biography[edit] Little is known of Odda's early life, but he became ealdorman of Devon sometime before 878, ultimately succeeding Karl, or Ceorle, the ealdorman in 851.[1][2] Throughout the 870s Odda's liege, Alfred the Great, King of Wessex, was engaged in constant war with the Vikings. They had begun their invasion of England in 865, and by Alfred's accession in 871 the Kingdom of Wessex
Wessex
was the only Anglo-Saxon realm opposing them.[3] By 878 the conflict was going poorly for Alfred
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Battle Of Cynwit
The Battle of Cynwit, also spelt Cynuit, was a battle between West Saxons and Vikings
Vikings
in 878 at a fort which Asser
Asser
calls Cynwit. The location of the battle is uncertain
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Attainder
In English criminal law, attainder or attinctura was the metaphorical "stain" or "corruption of blood" which arose from being condemned for a serious capital crime (felony or treason). It entailed losing not only one's life, property and hereditary titles, but typically also the right to pass them on to one's heirs. Both men and women condemned of capital crimes could be attainted. Attainder
Attainder
by confession resulted from a guilty plea at the bar before judges or before the coroner in sanctuary. Attainder
Attainder
by verdict resulted from conviction by jury. Attainder
Attainder
by process resulted from a legislative act outlawing a fugitive
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Ubba
Ubba, also known as Hubba, Ubbe, and Ubbi, was a mid-ninth-century Viking
Viking
chieftain and one of the commanders of the Great Army, a coalition of Norse warriors that in AD 865 invaded the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of Northumbria, Mercia, East Anglia and Wessex. According to a tradition recorded in Norse sagas, he was one of the sons of Ragnar Lothbrok. Contemporary English sources tend to describe the army's men as Danes and heathens, but there is evidence to suggest that a proportion of the force originated in Frisia, and one source describes Ubba
Ubba
as dux of the Frisians. In 865 the Great Army, apparently led by a man named Ivar, overwintered in East Anglia, before invading and destroying the kingdom of Northumbria. In 869, having been bought off by the Mercians, the Vikings conquered the East Angles, and in the process killed their king, Edmund, who was later regarded as a saint and martyr
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Edgar The Peaceable
Edgar (Old English: Ēadgār; c. 943—8 July 975), known as the Peaceful or the Peaceable, was King of England from 959 until his death. He was the younger son of Edmund I
Edmund I
and Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury, and came to the throne as a teenager, following the death of his older brother Eadwig. As king, Edgar further consolidated the political unity achieved by his predecessors, with his reign being noted for its relative stability. His most trusted advisor was Dunstan, whom he recalled from exile and made Archbishop of Canterbury
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Tavistock Abbey
Tavistock Abbey, also known as the Abbey
Abbey
of Saint Mary and Saint Rumon, is a ruined Benedictine
Benedictine
abbey in Tavistock, Devon.[1] Nothing remains of the abbey except the refectory, two gateways and a porch. The abbey church, dedicated to Our Lady and St Rumon, was destroyed by Danish raiders in 997[1] and rebuilt unde
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Ordwulf
Ordwulf (died after 1005) was the son of Ordgar, Ealdorman of Devon (died 971). His sister was Queen Ælfthryth, third wife of King Edgar (born 943, died 975; ruled 959-975) The Peaceful and mother of King Æthelred II (c.968-1016) The Unready, during whose reign Ordwulf was a major figure.[1] Ordwulf did not succeed his father as ealdorman but was however described by the chronicler John of Worcester
John of Worcester
as Dumnoniae Primus, that is "First in Devon"
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Henry I Of England
Henry I (c. 1068 – 1 December 1135), also known as Henry Beauclerc, was King of England
King of England
from 1100 to his death. Henry was the fourth son of William the Conqueror
William the Conqueror
and was educated in Latin
Latin
and the liberal arts. On William's death in 1087, Henry's elder brothers Robert Curthose
Robert Curthose
and William Rufus
William Rufus
inherited Normandy and England, respectively, but Henry was left landless. Henry purchased the County of Cotentin
Cotentin
in western Normandy from Robert, but William and Robert deposed him in 1091. Henry gradually rebuilt his power base in the Cotentin
Cotentin
and allied himself with William against Robert
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