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Earl Reece Stadtman
Earl Reece Stadtman (1919–2008) was an American biochemist,[1][2] notable for his research of enzymes[3] and anaerobic bacteria.[4] Stadtman received the National Medal of Science
National Medal of Science
from President Jimmy Carter in 1979 "for seminal contributions to understanding of the energy metabolism of anaerobic bacteria and for elucidation of major mechanisms whereby the rates of metabolic processes are finely matched to the requirements of the living cell".[4] Stadtman was Chief of the Laboratory of Biochemistry at the National Heart Institute.[2] Stadtman was also a member of the National Academy of Sciences.[1] The Washington Post
Washington Post
called Stadtman a "revered biochemist".[1] He was the husband of Thressa Stadtman, who discovered selenocysteine. Chronology[edit]1919: born in Carrizozo, New Mexico 1942: B.S
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Enzymes
Enzymes /ˈɛnzaɪmz/ are macromolecular biological catalysts. Enzymes accelerate chemical reactions. The molecules upon which enzymes may act are called substrates and the enzyme converts the substrates into different molecules known as products. Almost all metabolic processes in the cell need enzyme catalysis in order to occur at rates fast enough to sustain life.[1]:8.1 Metabolic pathways depend upon enzymes to catalyze individual steps. The study of enzymes is called enzymology and a new field of pseudoenzyme analysis has recently grown up, recognising that during evolution, some enzymes have lost the ability to carry out biological catalysis, which is often reflected in their amino acid sequences and unusual 'pseudocatalytic' properties.[2][3] Enzymes are known to catalyze more than 5,000 biochemical reaction types.[4] Most enzymes are proteins, although a few are catalytic RNA molecules. The latter are called ribozymes
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Selenocysteine
Selenocysteine
Selenocysteine
(symbol Sec or U,[2] in older publications also as Se-Cys)[3] is the 21st proteinogenic amino acid. Selenocysteine
Selenocysteine
<

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Minor J. Coon
Minor Jesser (Jud) Coon (born July 29, 1921) is an American biochemist and Victor V Vaughan Distinguished University Professor Emeritus at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.[1] He is best known for his research on cytochrome P-450[2][3][4] and as the co-discoverer of HMG-CoA, along with Bimal Kumar Bachhawat.[5][6][7][8]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Academic career 3 Awards and honors 4 ReferencesEarly life and education[edit] Coon was born in Englewood, Colorado
Englewood, Colorado
in 1921. He was an undergraduate student at the University of Colorado
University of Colorado
and received his bachelor's degree in 1943. He received his Ph.D.
Ph.D.
from the University of Illinois in 1946, supervised by William Cumming Rose
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Robert Schimke
Robert Tod Schimke (October 25, 1932 – September 6, 2014[1]) was an American biochemist and cancer researcher. He was born in Spokane, Washington, the son of a dentist and a homemaker.[2] Schimke studied at Stanford University, where he graduated in 1954 and attained his MD degree as a physician in 1958. From 1958 to 1960 he received specialist training (residency) at Massachusetts General Hospital. From 1960 to 1966 he was at the National Institutes of Health, where he worked on the way dietary changes affect the enzymes controlling the urea cycle in rats.[3] In 1966 he returned to Stanford, where from 1969 to 1972 he was on the board of the Faculty of Pharmacology, and from 1978 to 1982 he was chairman of the Department of Biology. At Stanford he examined the effects of steroid hormones on the synthesis of certain proteins, leading to new techniques in genetic engineering
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University Of California, Berkeley
Urban Total 1,232 acres (499 ha) Core Campus 178 acres (72 ha)[5] Total land owned 6,679 acres (2,703 ha)[6]Colors Berkeley Blue, California
California
Gold[7]          Athletics NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
FBS – Pac-12Nickname Golden BearsSporting affiliationsAm. East MPSFMascot Oski the BearWebsite www.berkeley.eduThe University of California, Berkeley
University of California, Berkeley
(UC Berkeley, Berkeley, Cal, or California[8][9]) is a public research university in Berkeley, California.[9] Founded in 1868, Berkeley is the flagship institution of the ten research universities affiliated with the University of California
California
system
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Eric T. Kool
Eric T. Kool is an American chemist, focusing in chemistry of RNA and DNA; probe design and imaging; synthetic biology, currently the George A. and Hilda M. Daubert Professor in Chemistry at Stanford University and is an Elected Fellow at the American Association for the Advancement of Science.[1][2][3][4] References[edit]^ "Eric Kool". aaas.org. Retrieved May 12, 2017.  ^ "Eric Kool". stanford.edu. Retrieved May 12, 2017.  ^ "Eric Kool". stanford.edu. Retrieved May 12, 2017.  ^ "Eric T. Kool". scholar.google.com. Retrieved May 12, 2017. This biographical article about an American chemist is a stub
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Anaerobic Bacteria
An anaerobic organism or anaerobe is any organism that does not require oxygen for growth. It may react negatively or even die if oxygen is present. (In contrast, an aerobic organism (aerobe) is an organism that can survive and grow in an oxygenated environment.) An anaerobic organism may be unicellular (e.g
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National Academy Of Sciences
The National Academy of Sciences
National Academy of Sciences
(NAS) is a United States
United States
nonprofit, non-governmental organization. NAS is part of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, along with the National Academy of Engineering
Engineering
(NAE) and the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). As a national academy, new members of the organization are elected annually by current members, based on their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Election to the National Academies is one of the highest honors in the scientific field. Members serve pro bono as "advisers to the nation" on science, engineering, and medicine
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National Heart Institute
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
(NHLBI) is the third largest Institute of the National Institutes of Health, located in Bethesda, Maryland, United States. It is tasked with allocating about $3.0  billion in tax revenue per year (fiscal year 2015 estimate) to advancing the understanding of the following issues: development and progression of disease, diagnosis of disease, treatment of disease, disease prevention, reduction of health care disparities within the American population, and advancing the effectiveness of the US medical system. NHLBI's Director is[when?] Gary H. Gibbons.Contents1 Operation 2 See also 3 Notes and references 4 External linksOperation[edit] The Institute plans, conducts, fosters, and supports an integrated and coordinated program of basic research, clinical investigations and trials, observational studies, and demonstration and education projects
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Jimmy Carter
Governor of Georgia1970 Georgia gubernatorial campaign1972 presidential campaignConvention1976 Presidential Race1976 presidential campaignElectionPresident of the United StatesPresidencyTimelineInaugurationCamp David AccordsEgypt- Israel
Israel
Peace TreatyTorrijos-Carter Treaties Iran
Iran
Hostage CrisisOperation Eagle ClawMoral Equivalent of War speech 1979 Energy Crisis Carter Doctrine Diplomatic Relations with ChinaAppointmentsCabinet JudiciaryPost-PresidencyPresidential Library Activities Carter Center One America Appealv t eJames Earl Carter Jr. (born October 1, 1924) is an American politician who served as the 39th President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1977 to 1981
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Washington Post
The Washington Post
Washington Post
(sometimes abbreviated as WaPo) is a major American daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C., with a particular emphasis on national politics and the federal government. It has the largest circulation in the Washington metropolitan area. Its slogan "Democracy Dies in Darkness" began appearing on its masthead in 2017.[6] Daily broadsheet editions are printed for the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. The newspaper has won 47 Pulitzer Prizes. This includes six separate Pulitzers awarded in 2008, second only to The New York Times' seven awards in 2002 for the highest number ever awarded to a single newspaper in one year.[7] Post journalists have also received 18 Nieman Fellowships and 368 White House
White House
News Photographers Association awards
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Dorothee Kern
Dorothee Kern, (born 1966) is a professor of Biochemistry
Biochemistry
at Brandeis University[1] and former player for the East German
East German
national basketball team.[2] She has published papers on, and continues to research, protein folding, especially using NMR
NMR
techniques.[3]Dorothee KernAcademic backgroundAlma mater Martin Luther UniversityAcademic workDiscipline BiochemistryInstitutions Brandeis UniversityReferences[edit]^ "Life Sciences Faculty - Dorothee Kern". www.bio.brandeis.edu. Retrieved 2018-03-25.  ^ Curry, Andrew: "Big Dreams Come True", Science, 326:792 ^ Eisenmesser, Elan Zohar; Bosco, Daryl A.; Akke, Mikael; Kern, Dorothee (2002). "Enzyme Dynamics during Catalysis". Science. 295 (5559): 1520–1523. External Links[edit]group websitev t ePfizer Award in Enzyme ChemistryFormerly the Paul-Lewis Award in Enzyme Chemistry David E
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Paul Schimmel
Paul Reinhard Schimmel (born 1940) is an American biophysical chemist and translational medicine pioneer.Contents1 Summary 2 Honors 3 Contributions to Translational Medicine 4 Education 5 Academic and Research Appointments 6 References 7 External linksSummary[edit] Paul Schimmel
Paul Schimmel
is an Ernest and Jean Hahn Professor of Molecular Biology and Chemistry[2] at The Scripps Research Institute.[3][better source needed] Prior to joining The Scripps Research Institute, he was a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Professor of Biochemistry
Biochemistry
and Biophysics at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
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William J. Rutter
William J. Rutter
William J. Rutter
(born August 28, 1928)[1] is an American biochemist who cofounded the early biotechnology company Chiron Corporation together with Edward Penhoet and Pablo DT Valenzuela. As Chairman of the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics of the University of California, San Francisco, Rutter helped establish that department as a leader in the academic side of the biotechnology during the San Francisco Bay Area biotech boom of the 1980s.[2] Rutter spent a short time in the United States
United States
Navy and one year Brigham Young University, before completing a B.A. (1949) in biochemistry at Harvard University. He earned an M.S. (1950) from University of Utah
University of Utah
and a PhD (1952) from the University of Illinois with a dissertation on galactosemia
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Neil Kelleher (scientist)
Neil L. Kelleher is the Walter and Mary Elizabeth Glass Professor of Chemistry, Molecular Biosciences, and Medicine
Medicine
at Northwestern University. His research focuses on mass spectrometry, primarily its application to proteomics. He is known mainly for top-down proteomics and the development of the fragmentation technique of electron-capture dissociation with Roman Zubarev while in Fred McLafferty's lab at Cornell University.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Research interests 3 Awards 4 External linksEarly life and education[edit]B.S. Pacific Lutheran University M.S. and Ph.D. Cornell UniversityResearch interests[edit]Mass spectrometry Electron-capture dissociation ProteomicsTop-down proteomicsAwards[edit]Biemann Medal, 2009 Pittsburgh Conference Achievement Award, 2008 Pfizer Award in Enzyme Chemistry
Chemistry
(American Chemical Society, Division of Biological Chemistry), 2006 A.F
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