HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

E1203
Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH, PVA, or PVAl) is a water-soluble synthetic polymer. It has the idealized formula [CH2CH(OH)]n. It is used in papermaking, textiles, and a variety of coatings. It is white (colourless) and odorless. It is sometimes supplied as beads or as solutions in water.[2]Contents1 Uses1.1 Fishing2 Preparation 3 Structure and properties 4 Tradenames of Polyvinyl Alcohol 5 Safety 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksUses[edit]Polyvinyl acetals: Polyvinyl acetals are prepared by reacting aldehydes with polyvinyl alcohol. Polyvinyl butyral
Polyvinyl butyral
(PVB) and polyvinyl formal (PVF) are examples of this family of polymers. They are prepared from polyvinyl alcohol by reaction with butyraldehyde and formaldehyde, respectively. Preparation of polyvinyl butyral is the largest use for polyvinyl alcohol in the U.S
[...More...]

"E1203" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

CAS Registry Number
A CAS Registry Number,[1] also referred to as CASRN or CAS Number, is a unique numerical identifier assigned by the Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) to every chemical substance described in the open scientific literature (currently including all substances described from 1957 through the present, plus some substances from the early or mid 1900s), including organic and inorganic compounds, minerals, isotopes, alloys and nonstructurable materials (UVCBs, of unknown, variable composition, or biological origin).[2] The Registry maintained by CAS is an authoritative collection of disclosed chemical substance information. It currently identifies more than 129 million organic and inorganic substances and 67 million protein and DNA sequences,[3] plus additional information about each substance
[...More...]

"CAS Registry Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Epoxy
Epoxy
Epoxy
is either any of the basic components or the cured end products of epoxy resins, as well as a colloquial name for the epoxide functional group.[1] Epoxy
Epoxy
resins, also known as polyepoxides, are a class of reactive prepolymers and polymers which contain epoxide groups. Epoxy
Epoxy
resins may be reacted (cross-linked) either with themselves through catalytic homopolymerisation, or with a wide range of co-reactants including polyfunctional amines, acids (and acid anhydrides), phenols, alcohols and thiols. These co-reactants are often referred to as hardeners or curatives, and the cross-linking reaction is commonly referred to as curing. Reaction of polyepoxides with themselves or with polyfunctional hardeners forms a thermosetting polymer, often with favorable mechanical properties and high thermal and chemical resistance
[...More...]

"Epoxy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Polyvinyl Acetate
Poly(vinyl acetate) (PVA, PVAc, poly(ethenyl ethanoate): commonly referred to as wood glue, white glue, carpenter's glue, school glue, Elmer's glue in the US, or PVA glue) is an aliphatic rubbery synthetic polymer with the formula (C4H6O2)n. It belongs to the polyvinyl esters family, with the general formula -[RCOOCHCH2]-. It is a type of thermoplastic.[1]Contents1 Properties 2 Discovery 3 Preparation 4 Applications 5 See also 6 ReferencesProperties[edit] The degree of polymerization of poly(vinyl acetate) is typically 100 to 5000, while its ester groups are sensitive to base hydrolysis and slowly convert PVAc into polyvinyl alcohol and acetic acid. PVAc emulsions such as Elmer's Glue-All
Elmer's Glue-All
contain polyvinyl alcohol as a protective colloid
[...More...]

"Polyvinyl Acetate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Vinylon
Vinylon, also known as Vinalon, is a synthetic fiber produced from polyvinyl alcohol, using anthracite and limestone as raw materials. Vinylon
Vinylon
was first developed in Japan in 1939 by Ichiro Sakurada, Ri Sung Gi, and H. Kawakami.[1] Production of this fiber was delayed for World War II. Trial production began in 1954 and in 1961 the massive February 8 Vinylon
Vinylon
Complex was built in Hamhung, North Korea.[2] Vinylon's widespread usage in North Korea is often pointed to as an example of the success of the juche philosophy, and it is known as the juche fiber.[3] Vinylon
Vinylon
has become the national fiber of North Korea and is used for the majority of textiles, outstripping fiber such as cotton or nylon, which is produced only in small amounts in North Korea
[...More...]

"Vinylon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Boric Acid
Boric acid, also called hydrogen borate, boracic acid, orthoboric acid and acidum boricum, is a weak, monobasic Lewis acid
Lewis acid
of boron, which is often used as an antiseptic, insecticide, flame retardant, neutron absorber, or precursor to other chemical compounds
[...More...]

"Boric Acid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sizing
Sizing
Sizing
or size is any one of numerous substances that is applied to, or incorporated into, other materials — especially papers and textiles — to act as a protective filler or glaze. Sizing
Sizing
is used in papermaking and textile manufacturing to change the absorption and wear characteristics of those materials. Sizing
Sizing
is used for oil-based surface preparation for gilding (also known as mordant in this context)
[...More...]

"Sizing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Coated Paper
Coated paper is paper which has been coated by a compound or polymer to impart certain qualities to the paper, including weight, surface gloss, smoothness or reduced ink absorbency. Various materials, including Kaolinite, calcium carbonate, Bentonite, and talc[1] can be used to coat paper for high quality printing used in packaging industry and in magazines. The chalk or china clay is bound to the paper with synthetic viscosifiers, such as styrene-butadiene latexes and natural organic binders such as starch. The coating formulation may also contain chemical additives as dispersants, resins, PE: to give water resistance and wet strength to the paper,[2] or to protect against ultraviolet radiation.Contents1 Varieties1.1 Machine-finished coated paper 1.2 Coated fine paper 1.3 Others2 See also 3 References 4 Further readingVarieties[edit] Machine-finished coated paper[edit] Machine-finished coated paper (MFC) has a basis weight of 48–80 g/m2
[...More...]

"Coated Paper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Release Liner
A release liner is a paper or plastic-based film sheet (usually applied during the manufacturing process) used to prevent a sticky surface from prematurely adhering. It is coated on one or both sides with a release agent, which provides a release effect against any type of a sticky material such as an adhesive or a mastic. Release liners are available in different colors, with or without printing under the low surface energy coating or on the backside of the liner. Release is separation of the liner from a sticky material; liner is the carrier for the release agent.Contents1 Industry segmentation1.1 Liner producer 1.2 In-house producer2 Liner materials2.1 Paper 2.2 Plastic film 2.3 Others3 Release agents 4 Applications 5 See also 6 ReferencesIndustry segmentation[edit] Globally there are between 400 and 500 companies involved in making or dealing with release liner products on an industrial scale
[...More...]

"Release Liner" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Biodegradable
Biodegradation
Biodegradation
is the disintegration of materials by bacteria, fungi, or other biological means.[a] The term is often used in relation to: biomedicine, waste management, ecology, and the bioremediation of the natural environment. It is now commonly associated with environmentally-friendly products, capable of decomposing back into natural elements. Although often conflated, biodegradable is distinct in meaning from: compostable. While biodegradable simply means can be consumed by microorganisms, compostable makes the further specific demand that the object break down under composting conditions. Organic material can be degraded aerobically (with oxygen) or anaerobically (without oxygen). Decomposition
Decomposition
of biodegradable substances may include both biological and abiotic steps. Biodegradable matter is generally organic material that provides a nutrient for microorganisms
[...More...]

"Biodegradable" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Carbon Dioxide
Carbon
Carbon
dioxide (chemical formula CO2) is a colorless gas with a density about 60% higher than that of dry air. Carbon
Carbon
dioxide consists of a carbon atom covalently double bonded to two oxygen atoms. It occurs naturally in Earth's atmosphere
Earth's atmosphere
as a trace gas. The current concentration is about 0.04% (405 ppm) by volume, having risen from pre-industrial levels of 280 ppm. Natural sources include volcanoes, hot springs and geysers, and it is freed from carbonate rocks by dissolution in water and acids. Because carbon dioxide is soluble in water, it occurs naturally in groundwater, rivers and lakes, ice caps, glaciers and seawater. It is present in deposits of petroleum and natural gas
[...More...]

"Carbon Dioxide" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Polyethylene Terephthalate
Polyethylene
Polyethylene
terephthalate (sometimes written poly(ethylene terephthalate)), commonly abbreviated PET, PETE, or the obsolete PETP or PET-P, is the most common thermoplastic polymer resin of the polyester family and is used in fibres for clothing, containers for liquids and foods, thermoforming for manufacturing, and in combination with glass fibre for engineering resins. It may also be referred to by the brand name Dacron; in Britain, Terylene;[4] or, in Russia and the former Soviet Union, Lavsan. The majority of the world's PET production is for synthetic fibres (in excess of 60%), with bottle production accounting for about 30% of global demand.[5] In the context of textile applications, PET is referred to by its common name, polyester, whereas the acronym PET is generally used in relation to packaging
[...More...]

"Polyethylene Terephthalate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hydrographics (printing)
Hydrographics or HydroGraphics, also known as immersion printing, water transfer printing, water transfer imaging, hydro dipping or cubic printing, is a method of applying printed designs to three-dimensional surfaces. The hydrographic process can be used on metal, plastic, glass, hard woods, and various other materials.[1]Contents1 History 2 Process 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The exact origin of the water transfer printing process is unclear. However, the first hydrographic apparatus registered for a US patent was by Motoyasu Nakanishi of Kabushiki Kaisha Cubic Engineering on Jul 26, 1982
[...More...]

"Hydrographics (printing)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Practical Effect
A practical effect is a special effect produced physically, without computer-generated imagery or other post production techniques. In some contexts, "special effect" is used as a synonym of "practical effect", in contrast to "visual effects" which are created in post-production through photographic manipulation or computer generation. Many of the staples of action movies are practical effects. Gunfire, bullet wounds, rain, wind, fire, and explosions can all be produced on a movie set by someone skilled in practical effects
[...More...]

"Practical Effect" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Formaldehyde
Butyraldehyde Decanal Heptanal Hexanal Nonanal Octadecanal Octanal Pentanal PropionaldehydeRelated compoundsmethanol formic acidExcept where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).Y verify (what is YN ?)Infobox references Formaldehyde
Formaldehyde
(systematic name methanal), is a naturally occurring organic compound with the formula CH2O (H-CHO). It is the simplest of the aldehydes (R-CHO). The common name of this substance comes from its similarity and relation to formic acid. Formaldehyde
Formaldehyde
is an important precursor to many other materials and chemical compounds
[...More...]

"Formaldehyde" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Putty
Putty
Putty
is a material with high plasticity, similar in texture to clay or dough, typically used in domestic construction and repair as a sealant or filler. Painter's Putty
Putty
is typically a linseed oil-based product used for filling holes, minor cracks and defacements in wood only. Putties can also be made intumescent, in which case they are used for firestopping as well as for padding of electrical outlet boxes in fire-resistance rated drywall assemblies
[...More...]

"Putty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.