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Dynasty Warriors 7
Dynasty Warriors
Dynasty Warriors
7 (真・三國無双6, Shin Sangokumusō 6, known in Japan
Japan
as Shin Sangokumusou 6) is a Hack and slash video game and the seventh official installment of the Dynasty Warriors
Dynasty Warriors
series. It is developed by Omega Force
Omega Force
and published by Tecmo Koei. The story is based on the 14th-century Chinese historical novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms. The game was unveiled at the 2010 Tokyo Game Show
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Video Game Developer
A video game developer is a software developer that specializes in video game development – the process and related disciplines of creating video games.[1][2] A game developer can range from one person who undertakes all tasks[3] to a large business with employee responsibilities split between individual disciplines, such as programming, design, art, testing, etc. Most game development companies have video game publisher financial and usually marketing support.[4] Self-funded developers are known as independent or indie developers and usually make indie games.[5] A developer may specialize in a certain video game console (such as Nintendo's Nintendo
Nintendo
Switch, Microsoft's Xbox One, Sony's PlayStation 4), or may develop for a number of systems (including personal computers and mobile devices).[citation needed] Video-game developers specialize in certain types of games (such as role-playing video games or first-person shooters)
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Cao Cao
Huang-LaoHuangdi Sijing HuainanziEarly figuresGuan Zhong Zichan Deng Xi Li Kui Wu QiFounding figuresShen Buhai Duke Xiao of Qin Shang Yang Shen Dao Zhang Yi Xun Kuang Han Fei Li Si Qin Shi HuangHan figuresJia Yi Liu An Emperor Wen of Han Emperor Wu of Han Chao Cuo Gongsun Hong Zhang Tang Huan Tan Wang Fu Zhuge LiangLater figuresEmperor Wen of Sui Du You Wang Anshi Li Shanchang Zhang Juzheng Xu Guangqiv t e Cao Cao
Cao Cao
([tsʰǎu tsʰáu]; Chinese: 曹操; 155 – 15 March 220),[1] courtesy name Mengde, was a Chinese warlord and the penultimate Chancellor of the Eastern Han dynasty
Han dynasty
who rose to great power in the final years of the dynasty. As one of the central figures of the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period, he laid the foundations for what was to become the state of Cao Wei
Cao Wei
and was posthumously honoured as "Emperor Wu of Wei"
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Jin Dynasty (265–420)
The Jin dynasty or the Jin Empire
Empire
(/dʒɪn/;[2] Chinese: 晉朝; pinyin: Jìn Cháo, sometimes distinguished as the Sima Jin or Liang Jin) was a Chinese dynasty traditionally dated from AD 265 to 420. It was founded by Sima Yan, son of Sima Zhao who was made Prince of Jin and posthumously declared the founder of the dynasty. It followed the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period (220-280 AD), which ended with the conquest of Eastern Wu
Eastern Wu
by the Jin. There are two main divisions in the history of the dynasty
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Shu Han
Shu or Shu Han
Shu Han
(221–263) was one of the three major states that competed for supremacy over China
China
in the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period (220–280). The state was based in the area around present-day Sichuan
Sichuan
and Chongqing, which was historically known as "Shu" after an earlier state in Sichuan
Sichuan
named Shu
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Cao Wei
Wei (220–266), also known as Cao Wei, was one of the three major states that competed for supremacy over China
China
in the Three Kingdoms period (220–280). With its capital at Luoyang, the state was established by Cao Pi
Cao Pi
in 220, based upon the foundations laid by his father, Cao Cao, towards the end of the Eastern Han
Eastern Han
dynasty. The name "Wei" first became associated with Cao Cao
Cao Cao
when he was named the Duke of Wei by the Eastern Han
Eastern Han
government in 213, and became the name of the state when Cao Pi
Cao Pi
proclaimed himself emperor in 220. Historians often add the prefix "Cao" to distinguish it from other Chinese states known as "Wei", such as Wei of the Warring States period
Warring States period
and Northern Wei of the Southern and Northern Dynasties
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Eastern Wu
Jianye (229–265, 266–280)Languages ChineseReligion Taoism, Confucianism, Chinese folk religionGovernment MonarchyKing (222–229) Emperor (229–280) •  222–252 Sun Quan •  252–258 Sun Liang •  258–264 Sun Xiu •  264–280 Sun HaoHistorical era Three Kingdoms •  Independence from Cao Wei 222 •  Sun Quan
Sun Quan
declaring himself Emperor 229 •  Conquest of Wu by Jin 31 May 280[1]Population •  238[2] est. 2,567,00
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Jin Dynasty (265-420)
The Jin dynasty or the Jin Empire
Empire
(/dʒɪn/;[2] Chinese: 晉朝; pinyin: Jìn Cháo, sometimes distinguished as the Sima Jin or Liang Jin) was a Chinese dynasty traditionally dated from AD 265 to 420. It was founded by Sima Yan, son of Sima Zhao who was made Prince of Jin and posthumously declared the founder of the dynasty. It followed the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period (220-280 AD), which ended with the conquest of Eastern Wu
Eastern Wu
by the Jin. There are two main divisions in the history of the dynasty
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Two Qiaos
The Two Qiaos
Two Qiaos
of Jiangdong (traditional Chinese: 江東二橋; simplified Chinese: 江东二桥; pinyin: Jiāngdōng èr Qiáo) were two sisters of the Qiao family who lived in the late Eastern Han dynasty. Their names were not recorded in history, so in later times they are simply referred to as Da Qiao (literally "older Qiao") and Xiao Qiao (literally "younger Qiao"). They were from Wan County (皖縣), Lujiang Commandery (廬江郡), which is in present-day Anqing, Anhui
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Diaochan
Diaochan
Diaochan
was one of the Four Beauties
Four Beauties
of ancient China. Unlike the other three beauties, however, there is no known evidence suggesting her existence; she is mostly a fictional character. It was mentioned in Chinese historical records that Lü Bu
Lü Bu
had a secret affair with one of Dong Zhuo's maids and was constantly afraid of being discovered, and this was one of the reasons why Lü Bu
Lü Bu
killed Dong Zhuo
Dong Zhuo
in 192. However, the maid's name was not recorded in history.[1] Diaochan
Diaochan
is best known for her role in the 14th-century historical novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms, which romanticises the events in the late Eastern Han dynasty
Eastern Han dynasty
and the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period
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Guan Ping
Guan Ping (died January or February 220)[a] was a military general serving under the warlord Liu Bei
Liu Bei
in the late Eastern Han dynasty.Contents1 Life 2 In Romance of the Three Kingdoms 3 In popular culture3.1 Religion 3.2 Video games4 See also 5 Notes 6 References6.1 Citations 6.2 BibliographyLife[edit] Guan Ping was the eldest son of Guan Yu. Little about him is documented in historical records except that he was captured along with his father west of Maicheng (麦城, southeast of present-day Dangyang, Hubei) by the forces of Sun Quan
Sun Quan
sometime between 23 January and 21 February 220.[a] They were executed in Linju (臨沮; in present-day Nanzhang County, Xiangyang, Hubei) later.[2] In Romance of the Three Kingdoms[edit] Guan Ping appears in the 14th century historical novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms by Luo Guanzhong
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Dong Zhuo
Dong Zhuo
Dong Zhuo
(died 22 May 192),[1] courtesy name Zhongying,[a] was a military general and warlord who lived in the late Eastern Han dynasty. He seized control of the capital Luoyang
Luoyang
in 189 when it was in a state of turmoil following the death of Emperor Ling and a clash between the eunuch faction and some court officials led by General-in-Chief He Jin. Dong Zhuo
Dong Zhuo
subsequently deposed Emperor Shao and instated Emperor Xian. Dong Zhuo
Dong Zhuo
rose to power in the Han imperial court and ruled the nation with tyranny and cruelty for a brief period of time. The following year, a coalition of regional officials and warlords launched a punitive campaign against him, forcing him to move the capital to Chang'an
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Tokyo Game Show
Tokyo Game Show
Tokyo Game Show
(東京ゲームショウ, Tōkyō Gēmu Shō), commonly known as TGS, is a video game expo / convention held annually in September in the Makuhari Messe, in Chiba, Japan. It is presented by the Computer Entertainment Supplier's Association (CESA) and Nikkei Business Publications, Inc. The main focus of the show is on Japanese games, but some international video game developers use it to showcase upcoming releases/related hardware
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Cao Pi
Cao Pi
Cao Pi
(187[2] – 29 June 226[3]),[4] courtesy name Zihuan, was the first emperor of the state of Cao Wei
Cao Wei
in the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period of China. He was the second son of Cao Cao, a warlord who lived in the late Eastern Han dynasty, but the eldest son among all the children born to Cao Cao
Cao Cao
by his concubine (later wife), Lady Bian. According to some historical records, he was often in the presence of court officials in order to gain their support.[citation needed] He was mostly in charge of defence[clarification needed] at the start of his career
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Gan Ning
Gan Ning
Gan Ning
(fl. 180s–210s[a]), courtesy name Xingba, was a military general serving under the warlord Sun Quan
Sun Quan
in the late Eastern Han dynasty. Originally a notorious pirate, he gave up the life of a marauder in the late 190s and became a subordinate of Huang Zu, the Administrator of a commandery in present-day east-central Hubei. Disheartened by Huang Zu's indifferent attitude towards him, Gan Ning eventually left Huang and made his way into Wu territory (present-day eastern and southeastern China), where he found his calling and became a military officer under the warlord Sun Quan
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Lü Bu
Lü Bu
Lü Bu
(died February 199),[1][2] courtesy name Fengxian, was a military general and warlord who lived during the late Eastern Han dynasty of Imperial China. Originally a subordinate of a minor warlord Ding Yuan, he betrayed and murdered Ding and defected to Dong Zhuo, the warlord who controlled the Han central government in the early 190s. In 192, he turned against Dong Zhuo
Dong Zhuo
and killed him after being instigated by Wang Yun and Shisun Rui, but was later defeated and driven away by Dong Zhuo's followers. From 192 to mid 195, Lü Bu
Lü Bu
wandered around central and northern China, consecutively seeking shelter under warlords such as Yuan Shu, Yuan Shao
Yuan Shao
and Zhang Yang. In 194, he managed to take control of Yan Province from the warlord Cao Cao
Cao Cao
with help from defectors from Cao's side, but Cao took back his territories within two years
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