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Dwarf Lanternshark
The dwarf lanternshark ( Etmopterus
Etmopterus
perryi) is a little-known species of dogfish shark in the family Etmopteridae
Etmopteridae
and possibly the smallest shark in the world, reaching a maximum known length of 20 cm (7.9 in). It is known to be present only on the upper continental slopes off Colombia
Colombia
and Venezuela, at a depth of 283–439 m (928–1,440 ft). This species can be identified by its small size at maturity, long flattened head, and pattern of black ventral markings and a mid-dorsal line. Like other members of its genus, it is capable of producing light from a distinctive array of photophores. Reproduction is aplacental viviparous, with females gestating two or three young at a time
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Conservation Status
The conservation status of a group of organisms (for instance, a species) indicates whether the group still exists and how likely the group is to become extinct in the near future
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Guajira Peninsula
Guajira Peninsula
Peninsula
[gwaˈxiɾa, gwaˈhiɾa] (Spanish: Peninsula
Peninsula
de La Guajira, also spelled Goajira, mainly in colonial period texts), is a peninsula in northern Colombia
Colombia
and northwestern Venezuela
Venezuela
in the Caribbean. It is the northernmost peninsula in South America and has an area of 25,000 km2 (9,700 sq mi) extending from the Manaure Bay (Colombia) to the Calabozo
Calabozo
Ensenada in the Gulf of Venezuela
Venezuela
(Venezuela), and from the Caribbean to the Serranía del Perijá mountains range. It was the subject of a dispute between Venezuela
Venezuela
and Colombia
Colombia
in 1891, and on arbitration was awarded to the latter and joined to its Magdalena Department
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Data Deficient
A data deficient (DD) species is one which has been categorised by the International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
as offering insufficient information for a proper assessment of conservation status to be made
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Trawl
Trawling
Trawling
is a method of fishing that involves pulling a fishing net through the water behind one or more boats. The net that is used for trawling is called a trawl. The boats that are used for trawling are called trawlers or draggers. Trawlers vary in size from small open boats with as little as 30 hp (22 kW) engines to large factory trawlers with over 10,000 hp (7.5 MW). Trawling
Trawling
can be carried out by one trawler or by two trawlers fishing cooperatively (pair trawling). Trawling
Trawling
can be contrasted with trolling, where baited fishing lines instead of trawls are drawn through the water. Trolling is used both for recreational and commercial fishing whereas trawling is used mainly for commercial fishing
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U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service
The United States Fish
Fish
and Wildlife
Wildlife
Service (USFWS or FWS) is an agency of the federal government within the U.S. Department of the Interior dedicated to the management of fish, wildlife, and natural habitats
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Type Specimen
In biology, a type is a particular specimen (or in some cases a group of specimens) of an organism to which the scientific name of that organism is formally attached. In other words, a type is an example that serves to anchor or centralize the defining features of that particular taxon
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Dermal Denticle
The skin of most fishes is covered with scales, which, in many cases, are animal reflectors or produce animal coloration. Scales vary enormously in size, shape, structure, and extent, ranging from strong and rigid armour plates in fishes such as shrimpfishes and boxfishes, to microscopic or absent in fishes such as eels and anglerfishes. The morphology of a scale can be used to identify the species of fish it came from. Cartilaginous fishes (sharks and rays) are covered with placoid scales. Most bony fishes are covered with the cycloid scales of salmon and carp, or the ctenoid scales of perch, or the ganoid scales of sturgeons and gars
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Caribbean Sea
The Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea
Sea
(Spanish: Mar Caribe; French: Mer des Caraïbes; Dutch: Caraïbische Zee) is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
in the tropics of the Western Hemisphere. It is bounded by Mexico
Mexico
and Central America to the west and south west, to the north by the Greater Antilles starting with Cuba, to the east by the Lesser Antilles, and to the south by the north coast of South America. The entire area of the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea, the numerous islands of the West Indies, and adjacent coasts, are collectively known as the Caribbean. The Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea
Sea
is one of the largest seas and has an area of about 2,754,000 km2 (1,063,000 sq mi).[1][2] The sea's deepest point is the Cayman Trough, between the Cayman Islands and Jamaica, at 7,686 m (25,217 ft) below sea level
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Barranquilla
Barranquilla
Barranquilla
(American Spanish: [baraŋˈkiʝa]) is a city and municipality located in northern Colombia. It is the only major city in South America that was populated before its formal foundation. Barranquilla
Barranquilla
is located near the Caribbean Sea. The city is located in the Atlántico Department, of which it is the capital
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Santa Marta
Santa Marta
Santa Marta
(Spanish pronunciation: [ˌsanta ˈmaɾta]), officially Distrito Turístico, Cultural e Histórico de Santa Marta ("Touristic, Cultural and Historic District of Santa Marta"), is a city in Colombia. It is the capital of the department of Magdalena and the fourth largest urban city of the Caribbean Region of Colombia, after Barranquilla, Cartagena, and Soledad
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Los Testigos Islands
Los Testigos Islands (Spanish: Islas Los Testigos, Witnesses Islands) are a group of islands in the southeastern Caribbean Sea. They are a part of the Dependencias Federales (Federal Dependencies) of Venezuela.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksGeography[edit] The Los Testigos Islands are located about 400 km (250 mi) northeast of Caracas
Caracas
and about 80 km (50 mi) northeast of Isla Margarita
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Death
Death
Death
is the cessation of all biological functions that sustain a living organism.[citation needed] Phenomena which commonly bring about death include aging, predation, malnutrition, disease, suicide, homicide, starvation, dehydration, and accidents or trauma resulting in terminal injury.[1] In most cases, bodies of living organisms begin to decompose shortly after death.[2] Death
Death
– particularly the death of humans – has commonly been considered a sad or unpleasant occasion, due to the affection for the being that has died and the termination of social and familial bonds with the deceased. Other concerns include fear of death, necrophobia, anxiety, sorrow, grief, emotional pain, depression, sympathy, compassion, solitude, or saudade
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Grenada
Coordinates: 12°07′N 61°40′W / 12.117°N 61.667°W / 12.117; -61.667Grenada La Grenade (French)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Ever Conscious of God We Aspire, Build and Advance as One People"[1]Anthem: Hail GrenadaRoyal anthem: God Save the QueenMap indicating the location of Grenada
Grenada
in the Lesser AntillesCapital and largest city St
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Nares
A nostril (or naris /ˈneɪrɪs/, plural nares /ˈneɪriːz/) is one of the two channels of the nose, from the point where they bifurcate to the external opening. In birds and mammals, they contain branched bones or cartilages called turbinates, whose function is to warm air on inhalation and remove moisture on exhalation. Fish
Fish
do not breathe through their noses, but they do have two small holes used for smelling, which may, indeed, be called nostrils. The Procellariiformes
Procellariiformes
are distinguished from other birds by having tubular extensions of their nostrils. In humans, the nasal cycle is the normal ultradian cycle of each nostril's blood vessels becoming engorged in swelling, then shrinking. The nostrils are separated by the septum. The septum can sometimes be deviated, causing one nostril to appear larger than the other
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Papilla (fish Mouth Structure)
The papilla, in certain kinds of fish, particularly rays, sharks, and catfish, are small lumps of dermal tissue found in the mouth, where they are "distributed uniformly on the tongue, palate, and pharynx".[1] They "project slightly above the surrounding multi-layered epithelium", and the taste buds of the fish are "situated along the crest or at the apex of the papillae".[1] Unlike humans, fish have little or nothing in the way of a tongue, and those that have such an organ do not use it for tasting, but merely for cushioning the mouth and manipulating things within it. The papillae of the fish, and the taste buds found on them, are therefore located on the interior or exterior surfaces of the mouth.[2] Most typically, these are found on the floor of the mouth, or on the upper lip. References[edit]^ a b B. G. Kapoor, H. E. Evans, E. A. Pevzner "The gustatory system in fish" in Advances in Marine Biology, Volume 13 (1976), F
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